B
Committee and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES

JOHN R.BALL, M.D., J.D. (Chair), is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and chaired the IOM Committee on Evaluating Clinical Applications of Telemedicine (Telemedicine: A Guide to Assessing Telecommunications in Health Care, National Academy Press, 1996). Dr. Ball is a graduate of Emory University, received a J.D. and an M.D. from Duke University in 1972, and was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at George Washington University from 1977 to 1979. After a residency in internal medicine at Duke Medical Center he held several health policy positions within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and was a senior policy analyst in the Office of Science and Technology Policy in the Executive Office of the President from 1978 to 1981. From 1986 to 1994 Dr. Ball was executive vice president of the American College of Physicians, and from 1995 to 1999 he served as president and chief executive officer of the Pennsylvania Hospital. Most recently, Dr. Ball was senior vice president and practice director of The Lewin Group. He is also a member of the American Clinical and Climatological Association and the Society of Medical Administrators.

JOSEPH V.BRADY, Ph.D., received a Ph.D. in behavioral biology from



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Safe Passage: Astronaut Care for Exploration Missions B Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES JOHN R.BALL, M.D., J.D. (Chair), is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and chaired the IOM Committee on Evaluating Clinical Applications of Telemedicine (Telemedicine: A Guide to Assessing Telecommunications in Health Care, National Academy Press, 1996). Dr. Ball is a graduate of Emory University, received a J.D. and an M.D. from Duke University in 1972, and was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at George Washington University from 1977 to 1979. After a residency in internal medicine at Duke Medical Center he held several health policy positions within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and was a senior policy analyst in the Office of Science and Technology Policy in the Executive Office of the President from 1978 to 1981. From 1986 to 1994 Dr. Ball was executive vice president of the American College of Physicians, and from 1995 to 1999 he served as president and chief executive officer of the Pennsylvania Hospital. Most recently, Dr. Ball was senior vice president and practice director of The Lewin Group. He is also a member of the American Clinical and Climatological Association and the Society of Medical Administrators. JOSEPH V.BRADY, Ph.D., received a Ph.D. in behavioral biology from

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Safe Passage: Astronaut Care for Exploration Missions the University of Chicago in 1951, after which he served as chief of the Department of Experimental Psychology at the Walter Reed Institute of Research. From 1963 to 1970 he was the deputy director of the Division of Neuropsychiatry at that institution while also directing the Space Research and Psychopharmacology Laboratories at the University of Maryland. In 1967 he was appointed professor of behavioral biology and director of the Behavioral Biology Research Center at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, a position he holds today. Dr. Brady has extensive experience in many areas of human behavior and has previously served on the National Research Council Committee on Space Biology and Medicine and on the Space and Earth Sciences Advisory Committee of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. BRUCE M.COULL, M.D., is professor of neurology and head of the Department of Neurology at the College of Medicine of the Arizona Health Sciences Center. From 1982 to 1995 he served as director of the Comprehensive Stroke Center of Oregon at the Oregon Health Sciences Center, and from 1991 to 1995 he was professor of neurology at the Oregon Health Sciences Center. Dr. Coull is on the editorial boards of four major journals dealing with stroke and related issues. He is a member of the Executive Committee of the American Heart Association’s Stroke Council and has served as the principal investigator or a co-principal investigator on numerous studies of stroke, including the multicenter Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation (SPAF I, II, and III) study, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke-funded Mechanism of Injury and Repair in Ischemic Stroke study, and the North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial. N.LYNN GERBER, M.D., graduated from Tufts University Medical School in 1971 and completed a residency in internal medicine at the New England Medical Center, followed by a fellowship in rheumatology at the National Institutes of Health. She then took a residency in physical medicine and rehabilitation at George Washington University, which she completed in 1977. Dr. Gerber is currently chief of the Rehabilitation Department of the Clinical Center of the National Institutes of Health and holds faculty appointments at Georgetown and George Washington Universities. She is board certified in internal medicine, rheumatology, and physical medicine and rehabilitation. She is widely published and has received numerous awards. Much of her work involves the study of mechanics of foot function,

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Safe Passage: Astronaut Care for Exploration Missions joint preservation, and energy conservation in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis, and she has helped develop programs for the use of ultrasound imaging of the musculoskeletal system. BERNARD A.HARRIS, Jr., M.D., is a retired astronaut who flew two missions of more than 438 cumulative hours, with 4 hours of extravehicular activity, during his 6-year tenure (1990–1996) in the astronaut corps. He received an M.D. from Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in 1982 and completed an internal medicine residency at the Mayo Clinic in 1985. He held a National Research Council endocrine fellowship for 2 years and was awarded an M.M.S. by the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, and an M.B.A. in 1999 by the University of Houston. Dr. Harris is an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, and served as director of its Center for Aerospace Medicine and Physiology. He also served as the chief scientist and vice president for science and health services at Spacehab, Inc., which designs and builds laboratory modules for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Dr. Harris is a member of the National Institutes of Health National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Advisory Council, the NASA Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications Advisory Committee, and the NASA Life Science Subcommittee. CHRISTOPH R.KAUFMANN, M.D., M.P.H., is a 1982 graduate of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) who completed a fellowship in trauma and critical care and received an M.P.H. at the University of Washington after completion of his surgical training. He is currently an associate professor of surgery at USUHS, where he directs the Trauma Program and serves as principal investigator on four major grants. He is heavily involved in computer simulation training and telesurgery and has planned and will run a major training laboratory for students and staff. Col. Kaufmann is active in local and national trauma organizations, site visits, and editorial review and regularly contributes to the literature on trauma and military medicine. He served on an Institute of Medicine exploratory committee on training for new technology. JAY M.McDONALD, M.D., received an M.D. from Wayne State University in 1969. After an internship in internal medicine at the University of Oregon, he returned to Wayne State University to complete a residency in pathology in 1974. He then moved to Washington University for a

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Safe Passage: Astronaut Care for Exploration Missions postdoctoral research fellowship and remained on the faculty until 1990. He was the director of the Division of Laboratory Medicine from 1980 to 1990. He then moved to the University of Alabama, Birmingham, where he assumed the chair of the Department of Pathology. Dr. McDonald’s research interests include diabetes, metabolism, osteoporosis, and calcium metabolism, and he has served on numerous study groups and organizations related to these topics. Dr. McDonald has been a prolific contributor to the scientific literature and serves on the editorial boards of three major journals. RONALD D.MILLER, M.D., received an M.D. from Indiana University in 1964 and had a residency in anesthesiology at the University of California, San Francisco, where he was also awarded an M.S. in pharmacology in 1967. He remained at the University of California, rising to the position of professor and chair of the Department of Anesthesia and professor of molecular and cellular pharmacology in 1984. He has assumed leadership positions in many local and national organizations involved with anesthesia, pharmacology, and critical care and has chaired the National Institutes of Health Surgery, Anesthesia, and Trauma Study Section and the Food and Drug Administration Anesthesia and Life Support Drug Advisory Committee, among many others. He has authored 54 book chapters and books, including the most widely used anesthesia text, and approximately 200 original articles. Dr. Miller is an Institute of Medicine (IOM) member who has served on several IOM committees. ELIZABETH G.NABEL, M.D., graduated from Cornell University Medical College in 1981 and then completed a residency in internal medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She spent the next 4 years as a clinical and research fellow at that institution before moving to the faculty at the University of Michigan. She was appointed director of the Cardiovascular Research Center in 1992, professor of medicine in 1994, and professor of physiology a year later. In 1997 she was named chief of the Division of Cardiology at the University of Michigan, and in September 1999 was appointed director of clinical research at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Nabel has been the principal investigator on numerous research grants and has been an active teacher at several academic levels. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine. TOM S.NEUMAN, M.D., is professor of clinical medicine, director of the Hyperbaric Medicine Center, and attending physician in the Pulmonary Di-

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Safe Passage: Astronaut Care for Exploration Missions vision at the University of California San Diego Medical Center. A graduate of Cornell University, he received an M.D. from the New York University School of Medicine in 1971, followed by performance of an internship and a residency in internal medicine at Bellevue Hospital. Dr. Neuman is board certified in internal medicine, pulmonary disease, occupational medicine, and emergency medicine. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and the American College of Preventive Medicine. Dr. Neuman has been a leader in the field of the physiology and medicine of diving throughout his career and is the editor-in-chief of Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine. DOUGLAS H.POWELL, Ed.D., is a clinical psychologist. He holds a diplomate in clinical psychology. He received his doctorate from Harvard University and has remained affiliated with that institution for 40 years. He has been a senior clinician at Harvard University Health Services and has been chief of the Psychology Service, director of Training and Research, and coordinated the Behavior Therapy program. Dr. Powell has held academic appointments on the faculties of psychology, extension, and, currently, medicine. He has had extensive contract with members of the university on many levels: assessment, counseling, advising, and teaching. While in the U.S. Air Force Dr. Powell evaluated astronaut candidates for the Gemini and Apollo programs. His four books focus mainly upon varieties of normal human development from the adolescent to the young-old years, and he is the senior author of MicroCog, a computerized neuropsychological screening test. He has had a career-long interest in the prediction of behavior, selection, and training. He is a senior partner at Powell and Wagner Associates, a Cambridge, Massachusetts-based consulting firm. WALTER M.ROBINSON, M.D., M.P.H., received an M.D. from Emory University in 1988, after which he spent 2 years at Boston City Hospital and 1 year at The Johns Hopkins University as a pediatric resident. After working in a neighborhood health center for 1 year, he returned to a fellowship in pediatric pulmonary medicine at Harvard/Children’s Hospital and also served a fellowship in medical ethics. He received an M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health in 1994 and completed a fellowship in the Program in Ethics and the Professions in 1998. Dr. Robinson is board certified in pediatrics and pediatric pulmonary medicine. He has continued to practice while teaching ethics at the medical school and postgraduate levels and serving on committees appropriate to his expertise. He is the associate

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Safe Passage: Astronaut Care for Exploration Missions director of the Division of Medical Ethics and directs the Harvard Medical School Ethics Fellowship Program, as well as the Program in the Practice of Scientific Investigation, and serves on the editorial board of Ethics and Behavior. CAROL SCOTT-CONNER, M.D., Ph.D., received an M.D. from the New York University School of Medicine in 1976 and stayed there for her surgical residency, which she completed in 1981. After leaving New York University, she joined the faculty at Marshall University and then moved to the University of Mississippi. During her tenure there she earned a Ph.D. in anatomy from the University of Kentucky and an M.B.A. Since 1995, she has been professor and head of surgery at the University of Iowa. Dr. Scott-Conner has been active on 22 editorial boards and has authored more than 200 original papers, abstracts, reviews, and book chapters. She holds memberships in many elected surgical societies and has frequently served in leadership positions. JUDITH E.TINTINALLI, M.D., received an M.D. from Wayne State University in 1969 and immediately entered a residency in internal medicine at Detroit General Hospital, which she completed at the University of Michigan. While working as the clinical director of the Department of Emergency Medicine at William Beaumont Hospital, she received an M.S. in biostatistics and research design from the School of Public Health of the University of Michigan. Dr. Tintinalli is chair and residency program director of the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of North Carolina. She is board certified in internal medicine and emergency medicine and has served as president of the American Board of Emergency Medicine as well as chair of its Research Committee and member of the Test Development Committee. She has represented the group at the American Board of Medical Specialties. She has taken a leadership position in many organizations related to her specialty and is involved in community and governmental service. Dr. Tintinalli serves on several editorial boards, is widely published, and is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Liaison to the Board on Neurosciences and Behavioral Health STEVEN M.MIRIN, M.D., is medical director of the American Psychiatric Association in Washington, D.C., a medical specialty organization with

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Safe Passage: Astronaut Care for Exploration Missions approximately 40,000 physician members in 76 district branches nationwide. He was president and psychiatrist in chief of McLean Hospital in Belmont, Massachusetts. Dr. Mirin is professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He has also served as president of the Massachusetts Psychiatric Society, chair of the Governing Council of the Section for Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Services of the American Hospital Association, and co-editor-in-chief of the Harvard Review of Psychiatry. His research activities have focused on the biological and psychosocial aspects of substance use disorders and the outcomes of care for psychiatric patients generally, for which he received the Presidential Award for Research from the National Association of Psychiatric Health Systems in 1991. Liaison to the Space Studies Board MARY JANE OSBORN, Ph.D., has a primary research interest in the biogenesis of bacterial membranes. Dr. Osborn was a research associate at the New York University College of Medicine from 1959 to 1961 and an assistant professor from 1961 to 1962. She progressed from assistant to associate professor at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York (1963– 1968). In 1968, she joined the University of Connecticut Health Center as a professor in the Department of Microbiology. Dr. Osborn has been head of the department since 1980. Dr. Osborn has served on the President’s Committee on the National Medal of Sciences from 1981 to 1982, as a member of the National Science Board from 1980 to 1986, and as a member of the Advisory Council of the National Institutes of Health’s Division of Research Grants (1989–1994), for which she was chair from 1992 to 1994. She has also served on the Council of the American Society of Biological Chemists from 1974 to 1977 and, again, as president from 1981 to 1982; as chair of the American Chemical Society’s Division of Biological Chemistry (1975–1976); and as president of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (1982–1983). Dr. Osborn is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (1978), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Academy of Microbiology (1992). Dr. Osborn is also the past chair of the Board’s Committee on Space Biology and Medicine. Liaison to the Board on Health Sciences Policy GLORIA E.SARTO, M.D., Ph.D., is professor and past chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of New Mexico

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Safe Passage: Astronaut Care for Exploration Missions School of Medicine in Albuquerque. Her research interests include studies of genetic disorders and reproductive dysfunction. Dr. Sarto is president of the Society for the Advancement of Women’s Health Research and is on the Professional Advisory Board of the Epilepsy Foundation of America. She is a member of the Board of Governors and Board of Directors of the National Center for Genome Resources and chairs the Advisory Council for obstetrics and gynecology of the American College of Surgeons. Dr. Sarto was a member of the National Advisory Council on Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health (NIH); the Clinical Research Panel of the National Task Force on the NIH Strategic Plan; and the Committee on Research Capabilities of Academic Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences. Additionally, she has been vice president of the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology and director of its Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine; a grant reviewer for the NIH Reproductive Biology Study Section and Human Embryology and Development Study Section; a panel member for the NIH Consensus Development Conference on Cesarean Childbirth; and a panel member for Treatment Effectiveness of Hysterectomy and Other Therapies for Common Noncancerous Uterine Conditions, a conference of the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, Center for Medical Effectiveness Research. Dr. Sarto has published extensively on a wide array of women’s health topics, including reproductive medicine and sexually transmitted diseases. She currently is on the editorial boards of Perinatal Press, Journal of Reproductive Medicine, and Women’s Health Letter. IOM PROJECT STAFF CHARLES H.EVANS, Jr., M.D., Ph.D., is Senior Adviser for Biomedical and Clinical Research at the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. A pediatrician and immunologist, he graduated with a B.S. in biology from Union College and an M.D. and a Ph.D. from the University of Virginia and trained in pediatrics at the University of Virginia Medical Center. From 1975 to 1998 he served as chief of the Tumor Biology Section at the National Cancer Institute and holds the rank of Captain (Ret.) in the U.S. Public Health Service with 27 years of service as a medical scientist at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. Dr. Evans’s research interests include carcinogenesis (the etiology of cancer), the normal immune system defenses to the development of cancer, and aerospace medicine. He discovered the ability of cytokines to directly prevent carcinogenesis and

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Safe Passage: Astronaut Care for Exploration Missions was the first to isolate a direct-acting anticarcinogenic cytokine, for which he was awarded four U.S. patents. Dr. Evans is the author of more than 125 scientific articles and is the recipient of numerous scientific awards including the Outstanding Service Medal from the U.S. Public Health Service and the Wellcome Medal and Prize. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Institute of Chemists and is a credentialed fellow in health systems administration of the American Academy of Medical Administrators. An active adviser to community medicine and higher education, he has served on the Board of Trustees of Suburban Hospital Health System and on the College of Arts and Sciences Board of Trustees at the University of Virginia. Dr. Evans is the study director for the Committee on Creating a Vision for Space Medicine During Travel Beyond Earth Orbit. MELVIN H.WORTH, Jr., M.D., is a scholar in residence at the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Worth completed his surgery residency at New York University-Bellevue in 1961 and remained on that faculty for 18 years. He founded the Bellevue Trauma Service in 1966 and continued as director until 1979, when he left to become director of surgery at Staten Island University Hospital. He served for 15 years with the New York State Office of Professional Medical Conduct and 8 years as a member of the New York State Hospital Review and Planning Council (for which he was chair in 1993). He is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the International Society for Surgery and holds memberships in the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma, the Society for Critical Care Medicine, the Association for Academic Surgery, the New York Surgical Society (for which he was president in 1979), and other academic and professional organizations. Dr. Worth retains his appointment at New York University and is clinical professor of surgery at the State University of New York Downstate (Brooklyn) and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Dr. Worth most recently served as an Institute of Medicine study staff member to the Committee on Fluid Resuscitation for Combat Casualties and is senior adviser to the Committee on Creating a Vision for Space Medicine During Travel Beyond Earth Orbit. JUDITH RENSBERGER, M.P.H., is a biomedical research and health policy analyst. She has 11 years of experience in government relations and 8 years of experience in health and science communications. From 1993 to 1999 Ms. Rensberger was manager, legislative and regulatory policy, for the

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Safe Passage: Astronaut Care for Exploration Missions American Dental Association and from 1988 to 1993 served as senior health policy analyst for the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare. Before that, from 1985 to 1987 she was communications director at the Foundation for Biomedical Research. She has advanced degrees in public health and science communications, plus additional work toward a doctorate in epidemiology. Ms. Rensberger is the senior program officer for the Committee on Creating a Vision for Space Medicine During Travel Beyond Earth Orbit. VERONICA A.SCHREIBER, M.A., M.P.H., received an M.P.H. with a concentration in epidemiology from the George Washington University in 1999. For her master’s research project, she designed and conducted research on patient referral and consultation practices by physicians of the Ambulatory Care Department of the George Washington University Medical Center. Before her health research work, she held teaching positions in political science and international relations for 11 years at the University of the Philippines (1974 to 1980), University of Pittsburgh (1980 to 1983), Frostburg State University (1983 to 1984), and the University of Maryland European Division (1988 to 1989). She was a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Pittsburgh when she accepted a teaching position at Frostburg State University in 1983. She was research consultant at the Bonn office of the European Institute for Environmental Policy (1987 to 1988) and training specialist at the German Foundation for International Development (1988 to 1991). She is a member of the Pi Sigma Alpha Honor Society and the Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society. Ms. Schreiber is the research assistant for the Committee on Creating a Vision for Space Medicine During Travel Beyond Earth Orbit. SETH M.KELLY is a 1999 graduate of Dartmouth College, where he earned an A.B. degree in philosophy with a minor in public policy (biotechnology and health policy). During the spring of 1998 Mr. Kelly designed, administered, and analyzed the results of a survey of 16 hospices and home care facilities as part of the New Hampshire End of Life Project at Dartmouth Medical School, and from June to September of that year he was an environmental health intern with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. He is a Wilderness Emergency Medical technician; served as medical officer, finance officer, and membership director of the Upper Valley Wilderness Response Team in Hanover, New Hampshire; and is a member of the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians and of

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Safe Passage: Astronaut Care for Exploration Missions the American Society of Bioethics and Humanities. Mr. Kelly is a project assistant for the Committee on Creating a Vision for Space Medicine During Travel Beyond Earth Orbit. TANYA M.LEE is a project assistant for the IOM Committee on a Strategies for Small Number Participants Clinical Research Trials and the Committee on Creating a Vision for Space Medicine during Travel Beyond Earth Orbit in the Board of Health Science Policy. She has been with the National Academies since April 2000. Tanya has attended the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and Prince Georges Community College, pursuing a degree in the field of sociology.

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