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A Biographical Sketches CHRIS G. WHIPPLE (Chair, NAE) is a principal in ENVIRON International Corporation in Emeryville, California. His professional interests are in risk assessment, and he has consulted widely in this field for private clients and government agencies. Prior to joining ENVIRON, he worked for ICF Kaiser Engineers (1990-2000) and the Electric Power Research Institute (1974-1990~. He served on the National Research Council's (NRC's) Board on Radioactive Waste Management (BROOM) from 1985 to 1995, and as its chair from 1992 to March 1995. He is a past-president and fellow of the Society for Risk Analysis. He holds a B.S. degree from Purdue University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in engineering science from the California Institute of Technology. D. WAYNE BERMAN is president of Aeolus, Inc., in Albany, California, and has more than 20 years' experience in solving complex environmental problems for a variety of government and private clients. He has extensive experience in chemical fate and transport; chemical process analysis; sampling and analytical method development; data quality analysis; data quality objectives development; risk assessment; and regulatory compliance. He holds a B.S. degree in chemistry from Muhlenburg College and a Ph.D. degree in physical chemistry from the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Berman is a member of the New York Academy of Sciences, American Chemical Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and American Society for Testing and Materials. SUE B. CLARK is the Meyer Distinguished Associate Professor at Washington State University in Pullman, Washington. Dr. Clark's current research focus is on the oxidation-reduction chemistry of plutonium in natural aquatic systems. She served previously on the BROOM's Committee on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. She holds a B.S. degree from Lander College and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in inorganic and radiochemistr~y from Florida State University. Prior to joining Washington State University, she worked as an assistant research ecologist at the University of Georgia's Savannah River Ecology Laboratory and as a research assistant at Katholieke University te Leuven in Belgium. Dr. Clark has received the Westinghouse Savannah River Company's Total Quality Achievement Award. She is a member of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society, and the American Chemical Society. 163

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164 Science and Technology for Environmental Cleanup JOHN C. FOUNTAIN is professor and chair of the department of geology at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York. Dr. Fountain's research has focused on contaminant hydrology, specifically aquifer remediation and characterization of fractured rock aquifers. He has served on several BROOM study committees, including the Committee on Technologies for Cleanup of Subsurface Contaminants in the Department of Energy (DOE) Weapons Complex. Dr. Fountain holds a B.S. degree in chemistry from California Polytechnic State University, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in geology from the University of California at Santa Barbara. He is a member of several scientific societies, including the Geological Society of America, the American Geophysical Union, and the National Ground Water Association. LYNN W. GELHAR is a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research activities encompass stochastic theories of transport processes for unsaturated flow, fractured media, chemically heterogeneous media, variable viscosity fluids, biodegradation, multiphase flow, controlled field experiments on macrodispersion in aquifers and unsaturated flow, supercomputer simulation of flow and transport in heterogeneous porous media, and stimulation of in situ biodegradation using gas injection. Dr. Gelhar has more than two decades of experience on aspects of subsurface hydrology relating specifically to problems of radioactive waste disposal in the United States and abroad. He has served on several multidisciplinary review teams, including groups reviewing environmental aspects of the Hanford site, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, and the Nevada Test Site. He is currently serving on the NRC Panel on Conceptual Models of Flow and Transport in the Fractured Vadose Zone. Dr. Gelhar holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from the University of Wisconsin. LISA C. GREEN is a technical manager with Lucent Technologies in Norcross, Georgia. Her expertise is in chemical engineering and analytical characterization applied to large-scale manufacturing, and she has more than 20 years of process engineering and project management experience. At Lucent, she has had extensive experience in engineering and management of chemical processing and waste management systems, including experience in working with regulatory agencies, risk management teams, and insurance companies. She holds an M.S. degree in analytical chemistry and a B.Che. degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology. She has received three STAR (Significant Technical Achievement Recognition) awards and three Lucent Environmental Hero Awards for her work.

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Biographical Sketches 165 ROBERT O. HALL, JR., is an assistant professor in the Department of Zoology and Physiology at the University of Wyoming. His current research interests include interactions of aquatic community structure and ecosystem function, energy, and nutrient flow in food webs; bacterivory by aquatic invertebrates; stable isotopes as food web tracers; and nitrogen cycling. His current research projects include estimating controls of nutrient uptake and retention in streams in Grand Teton National Park. Dr. Hall holds a B.S. degree from Cornell University and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Georgia. EDWIN E. HERRICKS is professor of environmental biology in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His areas of expertise include aquatic ecology and stream ecosystem and watershed management, and he has broad experience in the identification, assessment, and restoration of the adverse effects of man's activities on streams, rivers, lakes, and their watersheds. His current research has focused on the development of methods to restore and manage wetland design and management, the development of test systems to assess episodic exposure to contaminants common in urban runoff, and the assessment of the effects of global climate change on natural resources. Dr. Herricks is currently serving on the NRC's Surface Transportation Environmental Research Advisory Board. He has written numerous articles and papers on the broad theme of improving engineering design and environmental decision making. He is a member of the Urban Water Resources Research Council of the American Society of Civil Engineers and chairman of a task group on receiving system effects from urban runoff. He holds a B.A. in biology and english from the University of Kansas, an M.S. in engineering from the Johns Hopkins University, and a Ph.D. in biology from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. BRUCE D. HONEYMAN is a professor of environmental science and engineering at the Colorado School of Mines in Golden. His research interests include the physical and chemical processes controlling the fate of chemical species, especially radionuclides, in natural and engineered systems; nuclear environmental chemistry; actinide surface chemistry; colloid-facilitated contaminant transport; metal-organic complex formation; and treatment of radionuclide-contaminated environmental media. Dr. Honeyman holds a B.S. degree in applied earth sciences and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in environmental engineering and sciences from Stanford University. He is a member of several professional societies, including the American Chemical Society, the American Geophysical Union, and the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography.

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166 Science and Technology for Environmental Cleanup SALOMON LEVY (NAE) is a retired chairman and chief executive officer of S. Levy Inc., a consulting firm to the power industry that he formed in 1977. He is now a principal in Levy & Associates and continues to provide personal consulting services to the power industry. He has served as a consultant or on oversight committees for several utility companies and as an adjunct professor at the University of California, Berkeley and Los Angeles. From 1953 to 1977, the General Electric Company employed him in a variety of technical and managerial positions, the last of which was as general manager of the Boiling Water Reactor Operations. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on several NRC committees. Dr. Levy holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of California at Berkeley. JAMES K. MITCHELL (NAS, NAE) is University Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg and a consulting geotechnical engineer. Dr. Mitchell's expertise is in civil engineering and geotechnical engineering, with emphasis on problems and projects involving construction on, in, and with the earth; mitigation of ground failure risk; waste containment and site remediation soil improvement; soil behavior; geotechnical earthquake engineering; environmental geotechnics; and compositional and physicochemical properties of soils. He has served on several National Research Council committees, most recently the BRWM-Water Science and Technology Board (WSTB) Committee on DOE Research in Subsurface Science. Dr. Mitchell holds a B.S. degree in civil engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. LEON T. SILVER (NAS) is the W.M. Keck Foundation Professor for Resource Geology (emeritus) at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Silver's research focuses on several areas of geology and geochemistry including the petrology and history of the continental lithosphere. He has served on numerous National Research Council committees, most recently the BRWM-WSTB Committee on DOE Research in Subsurface Science. Dr. Silver was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1974. He holds a B.S. degree in civil engineering from the University of Colorado, an M.S. degree in geology from the University of New Mexico, and a Ph.D. degree from the California Institute of Technology. LESLIE SMITH is the Cominco Chair in Minerals and the Environment at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. His expertise is in the areas of subsurface hydrology and contaminant transport processes. His

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Biographical Sketches 167 current research interests include transport processes in fractured rock masses, hydrologic processes in unsaturated waste rock piles, hydrogeological decision analysis and risk assessment, inverse modeling, and radionuclide transport in watersheds near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in the Ukraine. Dr. Smith has served on several National Research Council committees, including the BROOM's Committee to Review Specific Scientific and Technical Safety Issues Related to the Ward Valley, California, Low Level Radioactive Waste Site. Dr. Smith holds a B.S. degree in geology from the University of Alberta and a Ph.D. in geological sciences from the University of British Columbia. DAVID A. STONESTROM is a hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Menlo Park, California. He is chief of the research project titled "Application of Unsaturated Flow Theory to the Phenomena of Infiltration and Drainage" for the National Research Program of the Water Resources Division. He is also a coordinator of the Amargosa Desert Research Site for the USGS Toxic Substances Hydrology Program. His current research investigates processes governing the occurrence and movement of gases and liquids in unsaturated zones by applying principles of soil physics, pedology, and geochemistry. He holds a B.S. degree in geology from Dickinson College and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in hydrology from Stanford University. Dr. Stonestrom holds membership in several professional societies, including the American Geophysical Union, the Soil Science Society of America, and the Coalition for Earth Science Education.