D Biographies of Committee Members

Nikil Jayant, Chair, is the John Pippin Chair in Wireless Systems in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Georgia Institute of Technology, founding director of the Georgia Tech Broadband Institute, and executive director of GCATT, the Georgia Centers for Advanced Telecommunications Technology. Earlier at Bell Laboratories, Dr. Jayant created and managed the Signal Processing Research Department, the Advanced Audio Technology Department, and the Multimedia Communications Research Laboratory. Contributions from these organizations include the definition of unified structures for signal processing and computing, the invention of new technology for high-density magnetic recording, the creation of the 16-kbps CCITT (Consultative Committee on International Telephony and Telegraphy) international standard for network telephony, channel equalization and data coding technologies for the IS54 North American Digital Cellular standard, coding and transmission methodologies for voiceband videotelephony and high-definition television, the establishment of perceptual coding as a definitive criterion for low-bit-rate coding of audiovisual signals, and the development of a digital audio broadcast system as potential future technology for CD-quality radio broadcasting in the United States. More recent contributions include software for text-to-speech synthesis, automatic speech recognition, and natural language dialog; software for Internet communication of speech, music, and video signals; and multimedia systems for messaging and the human-computer interface. Dr. Jayant has published more than 100 papers, written a number of books, and has been granted more than



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Broadband Bringing Home the Bits D Biographies of Committee Members Nikil Jayant, Chair, is the John Pippin Chair in Wireless Systems in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Georgia Institute of Technology, founding director of the Georgia Tech Broadband Institute, and executive director of GCATT, the Georgia Centers for Advanced Telecommunications Technology. Earlier at Bell Laboratories, Dr. Jayant created and managed the Signal Processing Research Department, the Advanced Audio Technology Department, and the Multimedia Communications Research Laboratory. Contributions from these organizations include the definition of unified structures for signal processing and computing, the invention of new technology for high-density magnetic recording, the creation of the 16-kbps CCITT (Consultative Committee on International Telephony and Telegraphy) international standard for network telephony, channel equalization and data coding technologies for the IS54 North American Digital Cellular standard, coding and transmission methodologies for voiceband videotelephony and high-definition television, the establishment of perceptual coding as a definitive criterion for low-bit-rate coding of audiovisual signals, and the development of a digital audio broadcast system as potential future technology for CD-quality radio broadcasting in the United States. More recent contributions include software for text-to-speech synthesis, automatic speech recognition, and natural language dialog; software for Internet communication of speech, music, and video signals; and multimedia systems for messaging and the human-computer interface. Dr. Jayant has published more than 100 papers, written a number of books, and has been granted more than

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Broadband Bringing Home the Bits 20 patents. Businesses created by Dr. Jayant’s research and leadership span several segments in audiovisual and data communications. Dr. Jayant has received several honors, including the Alfred Hay Gold Medal (for the best student in communication engineering, Indian Institute of Science, 1965), the IEEE Browder J. Thompson Memorial Prize Award (for the best IEEE publication by an author under thirty years of age, 1974), the Industry Paper Award from the Institution of Electrical and Telecommunication Engineers (India, 1990), the IEEE Donald G. Fink Prize Paper Award (for the best tutorial paper in an IEEE publication, 1995), and the 1997 Lucent Patent Recognition Award. Dr. Jayant was inducted into the New Jersey Inventors Hall of Fame for his contributions to the reduction of noise in communication systems and is a fellow of the IEEE and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Jayant serves on the advisory board of NTT-DoCoMo-USA and is a co-founder and chief scientist of EGTechnology, which creates software solutions for last-mile multimedia. Dr. Jayant received his PhD in Electrical Communication Engineering from the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India, in 1970. James A. Chiddix is president of the Interactive Personal Video Group at AOL Time Warner. The IPV Group is headquartered in New York City and is chartered with the development of a new broadband video service to be delivered to the company’s millions of digital cable subscribers. The service will provide an array of server-based products, ranging from access to a large library of video on an on-demand basis, to personal video recorder access and storage of live programming. It also will provide highly targeted advertising delivery. For the last 15 years, Mr. Chiddix has served as senior vice president and chief technical officer for Time Warner Cable, headquartered in Stamford, Connecticut, and its predecessor companies. Mr. Chiddix has been deeply involved in the introduction of virtually every new cable technology since the mid-seventies. He played a pioneering role in exploring the use of broadband optical fiber technology in cable television systems, which led to the universally adopted Hybrid Fiber Coax network architecture for cable systems. In 1994, he accepted, on behalf of Time Warner Cable, an Engineering Emmy Award for this work. He led the upgrade of Time Warner’s Queens, New York, system to 150 channels (1-GHz bandwidth), and was the architect of Time Warner’s Full Service Network interactive television trial in Orlando, Florida. Mr. Chiddix has been in the cable television business for 30 years. He spent 15 years in a variety of operating positions with two cable companies in Hawaii. He was also founder and president of CRC Electronics, Inc., in Honolulu, which manufactured videotape playback, automated delay, and random-access commercial insertion systems. CRC was sold to Texscan in 1981. In 1986, he joined Time Warner Cable’s

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Broadband Bringing Home the Bits corporate office. He also served for 8 years on the board of directors of CV-21, a cable television company in Fukuoka, Japan. Mr. Chiddix is a senior member and former director of the Society of Cable Television Engineers, a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and a member of the Cable Pioneers. Mr. Chiddix is a member of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. Mr. Chiddix currently serves on the committee studying broadband access and helped produce the CSTB report The Unpredictable Certainty: Information Infrastructure Through 2000. John M. Cioffi, BSEE, 1978, Illinois; PhDEE, 1984, Stanford; Bell Laboratories, 1978-1984; IBM Research, 1984-1986; EE prof., Stanford, 1986-present. Cioffi founded Amati Com. Corp. in 1991 (purchased by TI in 1997) and was officer/director from 1991 to 1997. He currently is on the boards or advisory boards of BigBand Networks, Coppercom, GoDigital, Ikanos, Ionospan, Ishoni, IteX, Jubilant, Marvell, Kestrel, Charter Ventures, and Portview Ventures and is a member of the U.S. National Research Council’s CSTB. Cioffi’s specific interests are in the area of high-performance digital transmission. He has received various awards: member, National Academy of Engineering 2001; IEEE Kobayashi Medal (2001), IEEE Millennium Medal (2000), IEEE fellow (1996), IEE JJ Tomson Medal (2000), 1999 University of Illinois Oustanding Alumnus, 1991 IEEE Comm. Mag. best paper; 1995 ANSI T1 Outstanding Achievement Award; and NSF Presidential Investigator (1987-1992). Cioffi has published over 200 papers and holds over 40 patents, most of which are widely licensed, including basic patents on DMT, VDSL, and vectored transmission. David D. Clark is a senior research scientist at MIT’s Laboratory for Computer Science, where he is currently in charge of the Advanced Network Architecture group. Dr. Clark’s research interests include networks, network protocols, operating systems, distributed systems, and computer and communications security. After receiving his Ph.D., he worked on the early stages of the ARPANET and on the development of token ring local area network technology. Since the mid-1970s, Dr. Clark has been involved in the development of the Internet. In the period 1981 to 1989, he acted as chief protocol architect for this development and chaired the Internet Activities Board. His current research area is protocols and architectures for very large and very high speed networks. Specific activities include extensions to the Internet to support real-time traffic, explicit allocation of service, pricing and new network technologies. In the security area, Dr. Clark participated in the early development of the multilevel secure Multics operating system. He developed an information security model that stresses integrity of data rather than disclosure control.

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Broadband Bringing Home the Bits Dr. Clark is a fellow of the ACM and the IEEE and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He received the ACM SIGCOMM award, the IEEE award in international communications, and the IEEE Hamming Award for his work on the Internet. He is a consultant to a number of companies and serves on a number of technical advisory boards. Dr. Clark is currently the chair of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. He chaired the committee that produced the CSTB report Computers at Risk: Safe Computing in the Information Age. He also served on the committees that produced the CSTB reports Toward a National Research Network, Realizing the Information Future: The Internet and Beyond, and The Unpredictable Certainty: Information Infrastructure Through 2000. Dr. Clark graduated from Swarthmore College in 1966 and received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1973. Paul Green recently retired as director of Optical Networking Technology at Tellabs in Hawthorne, New York. He joined Tellabs in January 1997 after many years at IBM Research, and before that, at MIT Lincoln Laboratory. At Lincoln he developed the first operational spread spectrum system (1953), coinvented the first channel-adaptive receiver (Rake, 1958), invented planetary range-doppler mapping (1960), and worked on large digital seismic arrays for computerized discrimination between earthquakes and nuclear explosions. At IBM, his team pioneered peer networking, which later became standard in IBM’s System Network Architecture. He initiated the WDM optical networking program there, which is credited with the first operational all-optical network (Rainbow-1 of 1991) and the first commercial WDM product, the IBM Muxmaster (1995). At Tellabs, his interests center on all-optical crossconnects, the key building block of all-optical networking. Dr. Green received the IEEE Simon Ramo Medal in 1991, the Association of Computing Machinery’s Annual Communication Award in 1994, and a number of IBM patent awards. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He has been president of both the IEEE Information Theory Society and the IEEE Communication Society. Kevin Kahn is an Intel Fellow, the corporation’s highest technical position, and currently the director of the Wireless Technology Lab, a corporate advanced development and research lab in Intel’s Corporate Technology Group. Additionally, he helps drive communications strategies and policy for the corporation and coordinates a variety of cross-corporate networking research. Some of his primary current focuses are broadband access to the home, home networking, wireless LANs, and Internet issues bearing on these topics. Throughout his 25-year career with Intel, he has worked in system software development, operating systems, pro-

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Broadband Bringing Home the Bits cessor architecture, and various strategic planning roles on programs involving most of the processors Intel has developed during the period. He has held both management and senior individual contributor roles. He was the co-chair of the Universal ADSL Working Group, an industry alliance dedicated to accelerating the deployment of consumer ADSL services for higher speed Internet access, and served as a member of the Board of Directors of the DSL Forum. He serves on a variety of NSF and NAS committees and panels, and is a member of the FCC Technical Advisory Committee. He holds a B.Sc. in mathematics from Manhattan College, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in computer science from Purdue University. Richard Lowenberg is a tele-community planner, environmental designer, media artist, and cultural activist. He has been executive director of the Davis Community Network and Yolo Area Regional Network in California since 1996. In this position he has been a consultant to the California Smart Communities Project and was principal coordinator of “WaterWorks,” an online civic decision-support project, funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CivNet program), Army Corps of Engineers, USGS National Spatial Data Infrastructure Program, and ESRI, Inc. He currently serves on the Board of the Association for Community Networking, on the Steering Committee of the Global Community Networking Congress, and on Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility’s DIAC program committee. Mr. Lowenberg was founding director of the Telluride Institute and its InfoZone Program, in Colorado, from 1985 to 1996. He served on the governing board of the Colorado Advanced Technology Institute’s Rural Telecommunications Project from 1994 to 1997; Web authored the 1995 U.S. Economic Development Administration funded “Rural Telecommunications Investment Guide,” and was a principal participant on the 1996 NTIA-TIIAP funded “Maps for People” project. He has been and continues to be a presenter, writer, and consultant on “Community Networking,” “Tele-Community Development,” “Networked Economics,” and “Information Ecology” in the United States, Europe, Latin America, and Japan; and his telecommunications and community development projects have received federal, state and local government grants; university and corporate support; international media coverage and recognition. Richard Lowenberg’s media, performance, and installation art works have pioneered in the integration of art, science, technology and ecology, with a primary focus on the social implications of the “Information Revolutions.” He has received numerous grants and awards, including from the National Endowment for the Arts, and has presented exhibitions and performances internationally, including at the Whitney Museum, San Francisco Museum of Modern Arts, Kunstmuseum

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Broadband Bringing Home the Bits Dusseldorf, Venice Biennale, and MIT List Center for Visual Arts. Most recently he has been “Artist in Bioregional Residence,” University of California at Davis. Clifford Lynch has been the director of the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) since July 1997. CNI, jointly sponsored by the Association of Research Libraries and Educause, includes about 200-member organizations concerned with the use of information technology and networked information to enhance scholarship and intellectual productivity. Prior to joining CNI, Dr. Lynch spent 18 years at the University of California Office of the President, the last 10 as director of Library Automation. Dr. Lynch, who holds a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of California, Berkeley, is an adjunct professor at Berkeley’s School of Information Management and Systems. He is a past president of the American Society for Information Science and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the National Information Standards Organization. Dr. Lynch currently serves on the Internet 2 Applications Council and the National Digital Preservation Strategy Advisory Board of the Library of Congress and was a member of the National Research Council committee that recently published The Digital Dilemma: Intellectual Property in the Information Infrastructure. Richard Metzger is partner in the law firm Lawler, Metzger & Milkman LLC in Washington, D.C. Mr. Metzger brings direct insight into federal telecommunications regulation and policy making, having served as deputy chief and subsequently chief, of the Common Carrier Bureau of the Federal Communications Commission from 1994 to 1998. In these positions, Mr. Metzger was actively involved in the FCC’s implementation of the Telecommunications Act of 1996. In particular, during his tenure in the Bureau, he supervised the preparation of recommendations to the Commission on a wide range of critical issues, including rules governing interconnection, access charge reform, and universal service. Prior to joining the Commission, Mr. Metzger was a member of the law firm of Rogers and Wells, resident in the Washington, D.C. office. His areas of emphasis in private practice included telecommunications, antitrust, and public utility regulation. Mr. Metzger is a graduate of Williams College, Phi Beta Kappa. He received a J.D. degree from Georgetown University Law Center. Elizabeth Mynatt is an assistant professor in the College of Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology. There she directs the research program in “Everyday Computing”—examining the implications of having computation continuously present in many aspects of everyday life. In

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Broadband Bringing Home the Bits home environments, Dr. Mynatt aims to enable older adults to continue living independently, through the use of future home technologies, as opposed to moving to institutional care settings. Dr. Mynatt is an internationally recognized expert in the areas of ubiquitous computing and assistive technologies. Prior to her current position, she worked for 3 years at Xerox PARC—the birthplace of ubiquitous computing—alongside its inventor, Mark Weiser. Her research explored how to augment everyday places and objects with computational capabilities. She has chaired multiple conferences on computer interface technologies and auditory displays, published numerous articles, and is an active leader in her field. Dr. Mynatt is a Sloan Research Fellow. Her research is supported by multiple grants from the National Science Foundation including a 5-year NSF CAREER award. Dr. Mynatt is the Associate Director of the Georgia Tech Graphics, Visualization and Usability (GVU) Center, and is responsible for research and educational objectives in human-computer interaction, including a highly regarded HCI Master’s Degree Program that bridges computing, psychology, design and communication. Dr. Mynatt received her Ph.D. in computer science at Georgia Tech under the guidance of Dr. James Foley. Her dissertation work pioneered creating nonspeech auditory interfaces from graphical interfaces to enable blind computer users to work with modern computer applications. Eli M. Noam has been a professor of economics and finance at Columbia Business School since 1976. In 1990, after having served for 3 years as Commissioner with the New York State Public Service Commission, he returned to Columbia. He is the director of the Columbia Institute for Tele-Information. CITI is an independent university-based research center focusing on strategy, management, and policy issues in telecommunications, computing, and electronic mass media. In addition to leading CITI’s research activities, Dr. Noam initiated the MBA concentration in the Management of Entertainment, Communications, and Media at the Business School and the Virtual Institute of Information, an independent, Web-based research facility. He has also taught at Columbia Law School and Princeton University’s Economics Department and Woodrow Wilson School. Noam has published over 19 books and 400 articles in economic journals, law reviews, and interdisciplinary journals. His books include the authored, edited, or co-authored volumes Telecommunications in Europe; Television in Europe; Telecommunications Regulation: Today and To-morrow; Video Media Competition; Services in Transition: The Impact of Information Technology in the Service Industry; The Law of International Telecommunications in the United States; The International Market in Film and Television Programs; Telecommunications in the Pacific Basin; Private Networks, Public Objectives; Global and Local Networks; Asymmetric Deregula-

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Broadband Bringing Home the Bits tion: The Dynamics of Telecommunications Policies in Europe and the United States; Telecommunications in Western Asia and the Middle East; Telecommunications in Latin America; Telecommunications in Africa; The New Investment Theory of Real Options and Its Implications for Telecommunications Economics; and Interconnecting the Network of Networks (Spring 2001). His forthcoming books include Media Concentration in the United States and The Dark Sides of the Internet. He has served on the editorial boards of Columbia University Press as well as of several academic journals. He was a member of the advisory boards for the federal government’s FTS-2000 telecommunications network, the IRS’s computer system reorganization, and the National Computer Systems Laboratory. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He received an AB (Phi Beta Kappa), M.A., Ph.D. (Economics), and J.D. from Harvard University. Dipankar Raychaudhuri is currently a professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, and director, WINLAB (Wireless Information Network Lab), at Rutgers University. He has previously held progressively responsible corporate R&D positions in the telecom/ networking area, including chief scientist, Iospan Wireless (2000 to 2001); assistant general manager and department head, Systems Architecture, NEC USA C&C Research Laboratories (1993 to 1999); and head, Broadband Communications Research, Sarnoff Corp. (1990 to 1992). During the period from 1995 to 1999, his research group at NEC USA developed one of the world’s first pre-commercial broadband wireless local area networks (“WATMnet”) for use in the 5-Ghz band. His research and new technology development experience also includes VSAT networks (1984 to 1987), digital TV/HDTV (1988 to 1991), ATM/IP switching and QoS (1993 to 1997), multimedia network processor (1993 to 1995), and MIMO/ OFDM system (2000 to 2001). Dr. Raychaudhuri obtained his B.Tech (Hons) from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, in 1976 and the M.S. and Ph.D degrees from SUNY, Stony Brook, in 1978 and 1979. He is a fellow of the IEEE. Bob Rowe has been a commissioner of the Montana Public Service Commission since 1993. His educational credentials include a B.A. from Lewis and Clark College; a J.D. from the University of Oregon; and additional graduate work in public administration and public policy at Harvard University’s Kennedy School Executive Program. Mr. Rowe is a past president of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and a past chair of the NARUC Telecommunications Committee. He is a member of the National Regulatory Research Institute’s board of directors, the Michigan State University Institute of Public Utilities Advisory Committee, and the New Mexico State University Center for

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Broadband Bringing Home the Bits Public Utilities Advisory Council. He is also a member of the Montana Food Bank Network’s board of directors and a member of the State Bar of Montana Professionalism Committee. He is past chair of the Regional Oversight Committee for US West. Before election to the Montana Public Service Commission, he was in public interest practice; was a VISTA volunteer; and was a public interest lawyer, specializing in utility law and policy; he also worked for the Montana Legal Service Association, a private nonprofit organization, and he represented a variety of community organizations in rate cases and other utility-related proceedings. He researched and wrote on customer-oriented utility policy for the National Consumer Center, the National Center for Appropriate Technology, and other organizations. Steven S. Wildman is director of the James H. and Mary B. Quello Center for Telecommunication Management and Law and the James H. Quello Chair of Telecommunications Studies at Michigan State University. The center, and through it his chair, is endowed, supporting broad-based and affiliation-dependent research in support of policy making. Previously, Dr. Wildman was an associate professor at Northwestern University and director of its Program in Telecommunications Science, Management, and Policy. His research interests include determinants of market structure and economic aspects of information and communication. He has served as a consultant on matters relating to broadcasting, cable television, and voice and nonvoice telecommunications. His publications include International Trade in Films and Television Programs (1988), Electronic Services Networks: A Business and Public Policy Challenge (1991), Video Economics (1992), and Making Universal Service Policy: Enhancing the Process Through Multidisciplinary Evaluation (1999). Professor Wildman received his Ph.D. from Stanford University.