Appendixes



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The Airliner Cabin Environment and the Health of Passengers and Crew Appendixes

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The Airliner Cabin Environment and the Health of Passengers and Crew This page in the original is blank.

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The Airliner Cabin Environment and the Health of Passengers and Crew Appendix A Biographical Information on the Committee on Air Quality in Passenger Cabins of Commercial Aircraft MORTON LIPPMANN (Chair) is professor of environmental medicine and director of the Center for Particulate Matter Health Effects Research and of the Human Exposure and Health Effects Research Program at New York University School of Medicine. He earned a bachelors degree in chemical engineering at the Cooper Union, a masters degree in industrial hygiene from Harvard University, and a Ph.D. in environmental health science from New York University. Dr. Lippman is a member of the Executive Committee of the Science Advisory Board of the Environmental Protection Agency and chairs several nongovernmental scientific advisory committees, including those of the National Environmental Respiratory Center and the University of Southern California Medical School’s Study of the Health Effects of Air Pollution in Children. He has also chaired or served on several NRC committees. HARRIET A.BURGE is associate professor of environmental microbiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. She earned a Ph.D. in botany from the University of Michigan and continued her postdoctoral training there in aeroallergens. Among several major areas of research, Dr. Burge’s current focus is on the role of environmental exposures in the development of asthma and evaluating exposure to fungi, dust mite, cockroach, and cat allergens in three separate epidemiology studies assessing risk factors for the development of asthma. Dr. Burge has served on a number of NRC committees, including

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The Airliner Cabin Environment and the Health of Passengers and Crew a study on airliner cabin air quality and a recent IOM study on asthma and indoor air quality. BYRON JONES is associate dean for Research and Graduate Programs and director of the Engineering Experiment Station at the College of Engineering, Kansas State University. He earned his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the Oklahoma State University. Dr. Jones’ research interests are in heat and mass transfer, human thermal systems simulation, and thermal measurements and instrumentation. He was recently appointed chairman of an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) standards committee that is developing standards for the aircraft cabin environment. JANET M.MACHER is an air pollution research specialist with the Division of Environmental and Occupational Disease Control of the California Department of Health Services. She holds a masters degree in industrial hygiene and microbiology from the University of California, Berkeley, and an Sc.D. in environmental health science from the Harvard School of Public Health. Her research has focused on the evaluation of methods to collect and identify airborne biological material and on engineering measures to control airborne infectious and hypersensitivity diseases. MICHAEL S.MORGAN is a professor in the Department of Environmental Health, Industrial Hygiene and Safety Program of the University of Washington and serves as director of the Northwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety (a NIOSH-fimded education and research center). Dr. Morgan holds a Sc.D. in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research is focused on human response to inhalation of air contaminants, including the products of combustion and volatile solvents, and has encompassed both ambient air contaminants and occupational environmental health hazards. WILLIAM W.NAZAROFF is professor of environmental engineering in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering of the University of California, Berkeley. He received his Ph.D. in environmental engineering science from the California Institute of Technology. His main research interest is indoor air quality, with emphasis on pollutant-surface interactions, transport/mixing phenomena, aerosols, environmental tobacco smoke, source char-

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The Airliner Cabin Environment and the Health of Passengers and Crew acterization, exposure assessment, and control techniques. Dr. Nazaroff has served as associate editor of Health Physics and currently serves in a similar capacity for the Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association. He is on the editorial board of Indoor Air. RUSSELL B.RAYMAN, currently executive director of the Aerospace Medical Association in Alexandria, VA, retired from the U.S. Air Force in 1989 with the rank of colonel after a military medical career. Dr. Rayman earned his M.D. from the University of Michigan. As a member of the Air Force, he served in many medical positions both abroad and in the United States and held a number of academic appointments at universities in Texas and Ohio. JOHN D.SPENGLER is the Akira Yamaguchi Professor of Environmental Health and Human Habitation and director of the Environmental Science and Engineering Program at the Harvard School of Public Health. He received his Ph.D. from the State University of New York in Albany. Dr. Spengler’s research is focused on assessment of population exposures to environmental contaminants (air, water, food, and soil) that occur in homes, offices, schools, and during transit, as well as in the outdoor environment. He has served on several NRC committees including Airliner Cabin Air Quality, Passive Smoking, and Risk Assessment of Hazardous Air Pollutants. IRA B.TAGER is professor of epidemiology in the Division of Public Health, Biology, and Epidemiology at the University of California, Berkeley, and is co-director and principal investigator for the Center for Family and Community Health. He holds an M.D. from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and an M.P.H from the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Tager’s research interests include, among others, the development of exposure assessment instruments for studies of health effects of chronic ambient ozone exposure in childhood and adolescence, effects of ozone exposure on pulmonary function, and the effects of oxidant and particulate air pollution on cardio-respiratory morbidity and mortality and morbidity from asthma in children. CHRISTIAAN VAN NETTEN is an associate professor in the Department of Health Care and Epidemiology at the University of British Columbia and head of the Division of Occupational and Environmental Health. He received his Ph.D. in biochemistry/electrophysiology from Simon Fraser University. Dr.

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The Airliner Cabin Environment and the Health of Passengers and Crew van Netten’s research interests include environmental toxicology, the use of electrodiagnostics to monitor worker exposure to agents that affect the peripheral nervous system, and identification of indoor air pollution associated with health problems. In addition, he has conducted research on air quality in commercial aircraft. BERNARD WEISS is professor of environmental medicine and pediatrics at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. He received his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Rochester. His special interests and publications lie primarily in areas that involve chemical influences on behavior. These include the neurobehavioral toxicology of metals such as lead, mercury, and manganese, solvents such as toluene and methanol, drugs such as cocaine, endocrine disruptors such as dioxin, and air pollutants such as ozone. CHARLES J.WESCHLER served for more than 25 years as a research scientist at Bell Labs and Bellcore (now Telcordia Technologies), including as program manager for the Advanced Environmental Strategies Group. He recently became an adjunct professor in the Department of Environmental and Community Medicine at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School/Rutgers. Dr. Weschler earned a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Chicago. His research interests include chemical interactions among indoor pollutants, the chemistry of the outdoor environment as it impacts the indoor environment, indoor-outdoor relationships for vapor and condensed phase species, indoor airborne particles and their inorganic and organic constituents, indoor chemistry as a potential source of particles, understanding the factors that influence the concentrations, transport, and surface accumulations of indoor pollutants, and impacts of indoor pollutants. HANSPETER WITSCHI is professor of toxicology and associate director of the Institute for Toxicology and Environmental Health at the University of California, Davis. He earned his M.D. from the University of Berne, Switzerland. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology and the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. Dr. Witschi’s research interests include experimental toxicology, biochemical pathology, interaction of drugs and toxic agents with organ function at the cellular level, pulmonary carcinogenesis, and air pollutants and lung disease.