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Biographical Sketches of Conference Presenters

Jacob E. Adams, Jr., is associate professor of education and public policy at George Peabody College, Vanderbilt University, and a research fellow with the Peabody Center for Education Policy. His research focuses on ways in which school finance and accountability policies and implementation practices shape school capacity.

Barbara T. Bowman is a founding faculty member of the Erikson Institute for Advanced Study in Child Development in Chicago. Her specialty areas are early education, cultural diversity, and the education of at-risk children. In addition to teaching, Bowman has directed a wide range of projects, including ones for Head Start teachers, caregivers of infants at risk for morbidity or mortality, teachers on American Indian reservations, and the Child Development Associates program. Her most recent work has been with the Chicago Public Schools, in which she provided inservice education for teachers in inner-city neighborhoods. She was a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children and chaired its Committee on Early Childhood Pedagogy.

John D. Bransford is centennial professor of psychology and co-director of the Learning Technology Center at George Peabody College, Vanderbilt University. He is also a senior research scientist at the University’s John F. Kennedy Center and senior fellow at the Institute of Public Policy Studies. His research has focused primarily on the nature of thinking and learning



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Achieving High Educational Standards For All: Conference Summary B Biographical Sketches of Conference Presenters Jacob E. Adams, Jr., is associate professor of education and public policy at George Peabody College, Vanderbilt University, and a research fellow with the Peabody Center for Education Policy. His research focuses on ways in which school finance and accountability policies and implementation practices shape school capacity. Barbara T. Bowman is a founding faculty member of the Erikson Institute for Advanced Study in Child Development in Chicago. Her specialty areas are early education, cultural diversity, and the education of at-risk children. In addition to teaching, Bowman has directed a wide range of projects, including ones for Head Start teachers, caregivers of infants at risk for morbidity or mortality, teachers on American Indian reservations, and the Child Development Associates program. Her most recent work has been with the Chicago Public Schools, in which she provided inservice education for teachers in inner-city neighborhoods. She was a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children and chaired its Committee on Early Childhood Pedagogy. John D. Bransford is centennial professor of psychology and co-director of the Learning Technology Center at George Peabody College, Vanderbilt University. He is also a senior research scientist at the University’s John F. Kennedy Center and senior fellow at the Institute of Public Policy Studies. His research has focused primarily on the nature of thinking and learning

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Achieving High Educational Standards For All: Conference Summary and their facilitation, with special emphasis on the importance of using technology to enhance learning. He chaired the National Research Council’s Committee on Developments in the Science of Learning and currently chairs the follow-on Committee on How People Learn—Targeted Report for Teachers. Diane Briars is director of mathematics for the Pittsburgh Public Schools and the co-director of PRIME, the Pittsburgh Reform in Mathematics Education Project. As such, she is responsible for all aspects of the K-12 mathematics program, including curriculum and assessment development, professional development, and the development of special programs. The major focus of current district work is implementation of standards-based instruction and assessment, as called for in the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics standards documents. Christopher Edley, Jr. (Co-Moderator), is professor of law at Harvard University and founding co-director of The Civil Rights Project, a Harvard-based think tank. He is widely known for his work related to civil rights and education and has a long history of public service. He served as senior advisor to President Clinton for the Race Initiative. He is a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Testing and Assessment. Ronald F. Ferguson is a lecturer in public policy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government and a senior research associate at the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy Research, Harvard University. He has written numerous publications and research reports on education, youth development programming, community change, economic consequences of skill differences, and state and local economic development. He is a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Community-Level Programs for Youth and its Board on Testing and Assessment. Barbara R. Foorman is professor of pediatrics and director of the Center for Academic and Reading Skills at the University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center, and principal investigator of the NICHD-funded grant “Early Interventions for Children with Reading Problems.” She was a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children. Patricia Gándara is professor of education at the University of California, Davis, and associate director of the Linguistic Minority Research Institute for the University of California system. Her research focuses on issues of educational equity, particularly as it relates to underrepresented and limited English proficient students. Among her current projects is a study of

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Achieving High Educational Standards For All: Conference Summary the formation of educational aspirations across ethnic groups in rural and urban high schools. Eugene Garcia is professor of education at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also Dean of the Graduate School of Education. His research is in linguistic and cultural diversity in schools. From 1993 to 1995 he served as the director of the Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Language Affairs at the U.S. Department of Education where he played a major role in the re-authorization of several key pieces of federal legislation. Antoine Garibaldi is a senior fellow at the Educational Testing Service, where his research and programmatic work are devoted to assessment and testing, teacher education, graduate education, and improving the academic performance of all students. In addition to his more than 20 years of experience in higher education and the federal government, he also has held teaching and administrative positions in elementary and secondary education. Edmund W. Gordon is serving as acting dean at Teachers College, Columbia University. Until his retirement in 1991, he held a primary appointment as John M. Musser professor of psychology and secondary appointments as professor, Institution of Social and Policy Studies, professor of child psychology, Child Study Center, and professor of epidemiology and public health, at Yale University. His research is on diverse human characteristics and pedagogy and the education of the low-status populations. Jay P. Heubert is associate professor of education at Teachers College, Columbia University, and adjunct professor of law at Columbia Law School. His current research involves how promotion and graduation testing affects student learning and dropout rates, particularly for students of color, English-language learners, and students with disabilities. He was study director for the National Research Council’s Committee on Appropriate Test Use and is a member of its Committee on Educational Excellence and Testing Equity. Michael Klentschy is superintendent of the El Centro School District in El Centro, California. He also is an instructor at San Diego State University Graduate School of Education, where he teaches and conducts research on alternate forms of assessment in elementary science. He is the principal investigator for the Valle Imperial Project in Science Local Systemic Change, funded by the National Science Foundation.

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Achieving High Educational Standards For All: Conference Summary Diana Lam is superintendent of the Providence Public School District in Providence, Rhode Island. Since 1992, she also has served as senior adviser and consultant with Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound. As principal designer of this program, she has been a consultant to school sites implementing expeditionary learning in Boston, Denver, New York, and San Antonio. She has been involved in a number of research projects implementing school reform and has served on the National Research Council’s Committee on Education Finance. Kim M. Lloyd is a National Institutes of Health postdoctoral research fellow at Princeton University. Her research focuses on social inequality and family structure. She and Marta Tienda were recently awarded a research grant from the Ford Foundation to investigate the long-term implications of the elimination of race-sensitive college admission criteria in the state of Texas and its subsequent replacement with the “Top 10 Percent” plan. Brian Lord is co-director of the Center for Professional Communities in Education at EDC, a research and development organization in Newton, Massachusetts. He has conducted research on the costs and configurations of professional development in urban school districts and on curriculum implementation and changes in teachers’ practice (with Diane Briars). He is currently leading a three-year study of models of teacher leadership in the National Science Foundation’s Urban Systemic Initiatives. Samuel R. Lucas is associate professor of sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include education and social stratification, racial disparities in academic tracking, and standardized testing. With his collaborator, Mark Berends, he is completing a cross-time comparative analysis of tracking in the United States. He is a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Minority Representation in Special Education. L. Scott Miller is executive director for public service programs at e-Higher Education in New York City. Previously he was the director of the National Task Force on Minority High Achievement, a three-year initiative of the College Board designed to address the continuing underrepresentation of black, Hispanic, and Native Americans among top students at all levels of the educational system. Gary Orfield is the director of the Harvard Project on School Desegregation, and co-director of the Harvard Civil Rights Project, which is devel-

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Achieving High Educational Standards For All: Conference Summary oping and publishing a new generation of research on multiracial civil rights issues. His central interest has been the development and implementation of social policy, with a central focus on the impact of policy on equal opportunity for success in American society. Recent works include studies of changing patterns of school desegregation and the impact of diversity on the educational experiences of law students. Craig Ramey is university professor of psychology, pediatrics, and neurobiology and director of the Civitan International Research Center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. His research involves the study of factors affecting the development of intelligence, academic achievement, and social competence in young children. During the past 30 years, he has led numerous research and development teams and has won professional and civic awards for his work on the prevention of intellectual disabilities and for exemplary early childhood education programs. He is currently focusing on the successful transition to school and the creation of a new generation of early childhood education, health, and family support programs. He is a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Minority Representation in Special Education. Michael A. Rebell is executive director for the Campaign for Fiscal Equity, Inc., a not-for-profit corporation that is a coalition of parent and advocacy groups, community school boards, and concerned citizens that seeks to reform the present methods for allocating city, state, and federal education funds to public school students in the City and State of New York. His research has focused on the areas of special education litigation, implementation of equal educational opportunity mandates, the role of the courts in educational policy making, and Title VII cases dealing with test validation issues and implications. Currently he is conducting research on remedies concerning fiscal equity reform implemented in 10 different states. Lauren Resnick is professor of psychology at the University of Pittsburgh, and director and senior scientist at the Learning Research and Development Center (LRDC), also at the University of Pittsburgh. LRDC researchers have been studying learning and the teaching of basic cognitive skills since 1963. Dr. Resnick has been involved in a number of educational reform research projects across the country. She was a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Title I Testing and Assessment. Bertha Rubio has been a principal at Crockett Elementary School in San Antonio since 1993. Previously she served as an assistant principal, guid-

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Achieving High Educational Standards For All: Conference Summary ance counselor, bilingual teacher, supervisor of an adult education program, and teacher of English as a second language to adults. Carmen Varela Russo is chief executive officer of the Baltimore City Public Schools. Previously she was associate superintendent of the Broward County (FL) Public Schools, where she was responsible for educational programs, technology, strategic planning, and accountability. She began her career as a teacher in New York City, served as principal of Morris High School in the South Bronx, went on to serve as superintendent of schools in the Bronx, and then chief executive for all of New York City’s high schools. She has been recognized for her success in improving student achievement by restructuring schools and providing practical professional development to teachers and administrators. Robert E. Slavin is co-director of the Center for Research on the Education of Students Placed at Risk at Johns Hopkins University and chairman of the Success for All Foundation. Dr. Slavin is a co-researcher and developer of Success for All, a comprehensive restructuring program for elementary schools currently in use in over a thousand schools across the country. The program emphasizes prevention of and early intervention for learning difficulties. Catherine E. Snow (Co-Moderator) is the Henry Lee Shattuck professor of education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her research involves the areas of language and literacy acquisition, as well as second-language acquisition and bilingualism. She has held teaching or research positions at Erasmus University and the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, at the University of Cambridge in England, at Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and at Universidad Autonoma in Madrid. She chaired the National Research Council’s Committee on the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children. Claude Steele is professor of psychology at Stanford University since 1991, and before that served on the faculties of the University of Michigan, the University of Washington, and the University of Utah. His research involves the processes of self-evaluation, especially in how people cope with self-image threat. This work has led to a general theory of the self-affirmation processes. A second area of interest is a theory of group stereotypes derived from extra self-evaluative and belongingness threats experienced by black Americans in all academic domains and women in quantitative domains, and how this can influence intellectual performance and academic identities.

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Achieving High Educational Standards For All: Conference Summary Samuel Stringfield is a principal research scientist at the Johns Hopkins University Center for the Social Organization of Schools. He serves as codirector of the Systemic and Policy Studies section of the Center for Research on Education of Students Placed at Risk. Stringfield is also codirector of the Program on Integrated Reform at the Center for Research on Education, Diversity and Excellence of the University of California at Santa Cruz. His two most recent projects concern designs for improving programs within schools as well as for improving whole schools. He was a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children. Marta Tienda is the Maurice P. During professor in demographic studies and director of the Office of Population Research at Princeton University. Her research interests include ethnic and racial stratification, population and economic development, socioeconomic integration of U.S. immigrants, poverty and social policy, and the sociology of employment and labor markets. She is a former member of the National Research Council Advisory Committee of the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Anna Zajacova is a first-year graduate student of sociology at Princeton University. Her research interests include the sociology of immigration, race and inequality, and social demography. She recently published a paper on social networking and adjustment of new Slovak immigrants in New York metropolitan area in Slovak Sociology Journal. Min Zhou is professor of sociology and Asian American studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her main areas of research are immigration, ethnic and racial relations, Asian Americans, ethnic entrepreneurship, enclave economies, and urban sociology. She has done extensive work on the education of immigrant children and children of immigrant parentage, and on the employment and earnings patterns of immigrants and native-born minorities. She is writing a book based on her recent ethnographic study of three immigrant communities in Los Angeles.

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