C

Workshop Papers

NOTE: The papers in this appendix are published essentially as received from their authors. They therefore should be regarded as a record of the workshop proceedings and not as a refereed work. Where possible, typographical errors, egregious errors of fact, and non-pertinent remarks have been redacted by the Committee on the Origins and Evolution of Life.

Listed below by session, the papers are reproduced on the CD-ROM of the full report but are not included in the printed report owing to space limitations.

SESSION 1:
INTRODUCTION TO THE DETECTION OF LIFE

History of Life Detection Approaches, 55

Gerald A. Soffen, Goddard Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

The Nature of Biochemistry in the Universe, 59

Norman R. Pace, Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado

Chance and Necessity in Biomolecular Chemistry: Is Life as We Know It Universal?, 64

Steven A. Benner, Departments of Chemistry and Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Florida

Self-Assembly Processes: Steps Toward Life's Origins, 68

David W. Deamer, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Cruz

Detecting Life on Extrasolar Planets, 74

James F. Kasting, Department of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University

SESSION 2:
SAMPLE RETURN

Sample Return from Primitive Bodies, 81

Donald Brownlee, Department of Astronomy, University of Washington

Mars Sample Return: Life Detection at All Levels, 83

Kenneth H. Nealson, Center for Life Detection, Jet Propulsion Laboratory



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OCR for page 51
Signs of Life: A Report Based on the April 2000 Workshop on Life Detection Techniques C Workshop Papers NOTE: The papers in this appendix are published essentially as received from their authors. They therefore should be regarded as a record of the workshop proceedings and not as a refereed work. Where possible, typographical errors, egregious errors of fact, and non-pertinent remarks have been redacted by the Committee on the Origins and Evolution of Life. Listed below by session, the papers are reproduced on the CD-ROM of the full report but are not included in the printed report owing to space limitations. SESSION 1: INTRODUCTION TO THE DETECTION OF LIFE History of Life Detection Approaches, 55 Gerald A. Soffen, Goddard Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration The Nature of Biochemistry in the Universe, 59 Norman R. Pace, Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado Chance and Necessity in Biomolecular Chemistry: Is Life as We Know It Universal?, 64 Steven A. Benner, Departments of Chemistry and Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Florida Self-Assembly Processes: Steps Toward Life's Origins, 68 David W. Deamer, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Cruz Detecting Life on Extrasolar Planets, 74 James F. Kasting, Department of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University SESSION 2: SAMPLE RETURN Sample Return from Primitive Bodies, 81 Donald Brownlee, Department of Astronomy, University of Washington Mars Sample Return: Life Detection at All Levels, 83 Kenneth H. Nealson, Center for Life Detection, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

OCR for page 51
Signs of Life: A Report Based on the April 2000 Workshop on Life Detection Techniques Searching for Life on Europa from a Spacecraft Lander, 86 Christopher F. Chyba, SETI Institute and Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University Sample Return from Titan for Exobiology, 91 Christopher McKay, Ames Research Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Planetary Quarantine, 93 John D. Rummel, Office of Space Science, National Aeronautics and Space Administration SESSION 3: DETECTING EXTANT LIFE X-ray Microscopy and the Detection of Life, 105 Chris Jacobsen, Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York, Stony Brook Characterizing the Intact Microbe-Mineral Interface, 108 William W. Barker and Jillian F. Banfield, Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin, Madison Single-Polymer Model Detection Using Nanopores, 112 Amit Meller, Rowland Institute at Harvard, and Daniel Branton, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University Extant Life Detection Using Stable Isotopes and Protein-chip Technology , 117 Marilyn L. Fogel, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington Iron Biominerals as Biomarkers, 123 Joseph L. Kirschvink, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometers: Miniaturized Instruments with a Biological Mass Range, 129 Robert J. Cotter, Middle Atlantic Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Life Detection Using Molecular Methods, 132 David A. Stahl, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Washington A Robotic-PCR Detector for DNA-based Life on Other Planets, 137 Gary Ruvkun, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital; Michael Finney, MJ Research; Walter Gilbert, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University; and George M. Church, Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School SESSION 4: DETECTING EXTINCT LIFE Formation and Preservation of Bona Fide Microfossils, 149 Sherry L. Cady, Department of Geology, Portland State University Electron-Beam Techniques for Microfossil Characterization, 156 David McKay, NASA Johnson Space Center Organic Detection, 164 Luann Becker, Department of Geological Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara Biomarkers and Biosignatures of Fossil Organic Compounds, 174 J. Michael Moldowan, Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University Organic Chemistry of Meteorites: Criteria for Abiotic Origins, 180 Sherwood Chang, SETI Institute Isotopes of Iron: Biomarker Prospects, 187 Ariel D. Anbar, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Rochester Development of In Situ Measurement Techniques for Detecting the Chemical Signatures of Life, 194 Wesley T. Huntress, Jr., Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington Miniaturized In Situ Instruments for Amino Acid Detection on Solar System Bodies, 197 Jeffrey L. Bada, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego