Appendix B
Biographical Information

George R. Hallberg, Chair, is a principal with the Cadmus Group, Inc., in Waltham, Massachusetts, conducting environmental research, regulatory analysis, and management services. Previously he was associate director and chief of environmental research at the University of Iowa’s environmental and public health laboratory and at the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. Dr. Hallberg was also an adjunct professor at both the University of Iowa and Iowa State University. He is currently serving as a member of the National Research Council (NRC) Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources and has also served on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy and Technology and on the Office of Water’s Management Advisory Group. His research interests include environmental monitoring and assessment, agricultural-environmental impacts, chemical and nutrient fate and transport, contaminant occurrence and trends in drinking water, and health effects of environmental contaminants. Dr. Hallberg received a B.A. in geology from Augustana College and a Ph.D. in geology from the University of Iowa.

Michael E. Campana is the director of the Water Resources Program and is a professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the University of New Mexico. His research interests include regional hydrogeology, tropical and arid land hydrology, surface water-groundwater-aquatic ecosystem interactions, and water resources development and management. Dr. Campana has served on several previous NRC committees, including the Committee to Review the USGS National Water Quality Assessment Pilot Program. He received a B.S. in geology from the College of William and Mary, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in hydrology from the University of Arizona.



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Opportunities to Improve the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program Appendix B Biographical Information George R. Hallberg, Chair, is a principal with the Cadmus Group, Inc., in Waltham, Massachusetts, conducting environmental research, regulatory analysis, and management services. Previously he was associate director and chief of environmental research at the University of Iowa’s environmental and public health laboratory and at the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. Dr. Hallberg was also an adjunct professor at both the University of Iowa and Iowa State University. He is currently serving as a member of the National Research Council (NRC) Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources and has also served on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy and Technology and on the Office of Water’s Management Advisory Group. His research interests include environmental monitoring and assessment, agricultural-environmental impacts, chemical and nutrient fate and transport, contaminant occurrence and trends in drinking water, and health effects of environmental contaminants. Dr. Hallberg received a B.A. in geology from Augustana College and a Ph.D. in geology from the University of Iowa. Michael E. Campana is the director of the Water Resources Program and is a professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the University of New Mexico. His research interests include regional hydrogeology, tropical and arid land hydrology, surface water-groundwater-aquatic ecosystem interactions, and water resources development and management. Dr. Campana has served on several previous NRC committees, including the Committee to Review the USGS National Water Quality Assessment Pilot Program. He received a B.S. in geology from the College of William and Mary, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in hydrology from the University of Arizona.

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Opportunities to Improve the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program Daniel B. Carr is a professor in the Department of Applied and Engineering Statistics at George Mason University. He previously worked as a senior research scientist and technical working group leader of the Exploratory Data Analysis Group in the Computational Science Department of Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories. His research interests include regional data display, statistical graphics for data analysis, exploratory data analysis, cognostics, regression analysis, and life science and physical science applications of statistics. He received a B.A. in mathematics and psychology from Whitman College, an M.Ed. in counseling from Idaho State University, an M.S. in statistics from Oregon State University, and a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Lorraine L. Janus is deputy chief of Drinking Water Quality Control and director of Watershed Field Operations for the New York City Department of Environmental Protection (NYC DEP). Previously, Dr. Janus was employed as assistant to the senior scientist at the Canada Center for Inland Waters and a senior environmentalist for the South Florida Water Management District. Her professional activities include primary and co-authorship of the Canadian Contribution to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Program on Eutrophication, several NYC DEP reports on phosphorus loading and impacts on water quality, water quality monitoring, and watershed monitoring and protection. She received a B.Sc. in biology and an M.Sc. in limnology from the University of Waterloo and a Ph.D. in limnology from McMaster University. Judith L. Meyer is a research professor in the Institute of Ecology and director for science of the River Basin Science and Policy Center at the University of Georgia. Her expertise is in aquatic ecology, especially nutrient cycling in streams, the role of riparian zones in controlling nonpoint source pollution, and the effects of land-cover changes on stream biodiversity. She has served on several NRC committees and is a former member of the Water Science and Technology Board. She received a B.S. from the University of Michigan, an M.S. from the University of Hawaii, and a Ph.D. in ecology and evolutionary biology from Cornell University. Kenneth H. Reckhow is a professor of water resources at Duke University and is the director of the University of North Carolina Water Resources Research Institute. Dr. Reckhow’s research interests focus on the development, evaluation, and application of models for the management of water quality. In particular, he is interested in the effect of uncertainty on model specification, parameter estimation, and model applications. Recent work has expanded this theme to consider the effect of scientific uncertainties on water quality decision making. He recently chaired the NRC Committee to Assess the Scientific Basis of the Total Maximum Daily Load Approach to Water Pollution Reduction. Dr. Reckhow

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Opportunities to Improve the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program received a B.S. in engineering physics from Cornell University and an M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental science and engineering from Harvard University. Marc O. Ribaudo is the leader of the Water Quality Research Program and the Coastal Resources Research Program of the Resource Economics Division, Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). He is responsible for developing and carrying out a research program on the broad set of water quality issues affecting agriculture and on the linkages between agricultural production and the quality of coastal resources, respectively. Specific expertise includes assessing the economic impacts of agricultural production on water users, assessing the performance of USDA conservation policies, and assessing the benefits and costs of federal and state water quality laws. He received a B.S. in natural resource management and an M.S. in agricultural and resource economics from the University of Maine. Dr. Ribaudo received a Ph.D. in agricultural economics from the Pennsylvania State University. Kenneth K. Tanji is a professor emeritus in the Department of Land, Air and Water Resources at the University of California, Davis. His research focuses on water quality aspects of irrigation and drainage including mass balance of salts and trace elements, use of marginal quality waters, and soil and water chemistry in croplands, agroforestry, evaporation ponds, and wetlands. Dr. Tanji has served on previous NRC committees assessing soil and water quality and the U.S. Department of the Interior’s National Irrigation Water Quality Program. He received a B.A. in chemistry from the University of Hawaii; a B.S. and M.S. in soil science from the University of California, Davis; and a D.Sc. in agricultural science from Kyoto University, Japan. Richard M. Vogel is a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Tufts University. His primary expertise is in the area of water resource engineering with emphasis on hydrologic, hydraulic, and statistical methods for analyzing water resource systems. His current research focuses on the areas of watershed modeling and management, regional hydrology, and environmental statistics. In addition to his academic experience, he has several years of consulting experience in the field of water resource engineering. He received a B.S. in engineering science and systems and an M.S. in environmental science and hydrology from the University of Virginia. Dr. Vogel received his Ph.D. in water resource systems from Cornell University. Marylynn V. Yates is a professor of environmental microbiology in the Department of Environmental Sciences and associate executive vice chancellor at the University of California, Riverside. Dr. Yates conducts research in the area of water and wastewater microbiology. Current research focuses on contamination

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Opportunities to Improve the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program of water by human pathogenic microorganisms, especially through the use of reclaimed water and biosolids; developing and improving methods to detect microorganisms in environmental samples; persistence of pathogenic microorganisms in the environment; and efficacy of water, wastewater, and biosolids treatment processes to inactivate pathogenic microorganisms. Dr. Yates previously served on the NRC Committee on Groundwater Recharge. She received a B.S. in nursing from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, an M.S. in chemistry from the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, and a Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Arizona. STAFF Mark C. Gibson is a staff officer at the NRC’s Water Science and Technology Board (WSTB) and was responsible for the completion of this study. After joining the NRC in 1998, he first supported then directed the Committee on Drinking Water Contaminants that released three reports, culminating with Classifying Drinking Water Contaminants for Regulatory Consideration in 2001. He is also the study director for the Committee to Assess the Services and Values of Aquatic and Related Terrestrial Ecosystems and co-study director of the Committee on Indicators for Waterborne Pathogens. Mr. Gibson received his B.S. in biology from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and his M.S. in environmental science and policy in biology from George Mason University. Laura J. Ehlers is a senior staff officer for the Water Science and Technology Board of the National Research Council. Since joining the NRC in 1997, she has served as study director for eight committees, including the Committee to Review the New York City Watershed Management Strategy, the Committee on Riparian Zone Functioning and Strategies for Management, and the Committee to Assess the Scientific Basis of the Total Maximum Daily Load Approach to Water Pollution Reduction. She received her B.S. from the California Institute of Technology, majoring in biology and engineering and applied science. She earned both an M.S.E. and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering at the Johns Hopkins University. Her dissertation, entitled RP4 Plasmid Transfer Among Strains of Pseudomonas in a Biofilm, was awarded the 1998 Parsons Engineering/ Association of Environmental Engineering Professors award for best doctoral thesis. Ellen A. De Guzman is a research associate at the NRC’s Water Science and Technology Board. She received her B.A. degree from the University of the Philippines. She has supported a number of studies including most recently the Committee to Review the New York City Watershed Management Strategy, Committee on Drinking Water Contaminants (Phase II), Committee on Risk-Based

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Opportunities to Improve the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program Analyses for Flood Damage Reduction, and the Committee to Assess the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Water Resources Project Planning Procedures. She coedits the WSTB newsletter and manages the WSTB homepage.