TABLE 2-1 Planned Cycle II NAWQA Study Unitsa

Abbreviation

Name

Scheduled Starting Year

ACAD

Acadian-Pontchartrain Drainages

2007

ACFB

Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basins

2001

ALBE

Albemarle-Pamlico Drainages

2001

CACI

Canadian-Cimarron River Basins

2007

CAZB

Central Arizona Basins

2007

CCYK

Central Columbia Plateau-Yakima River Basinb

2001

CNBR

Central Nebraska Basins

2001

CONN

Connecticut, Housatonic, and Thames River Basins

2001

DELR

Delaware River Basin

2007

EIWA

Eastern Iowa Basins

2004

GAFL

Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain Drainages

2001

GRSL

Great Salt Lake Basins

2007

HDSN

Hudson River Basin

2004

KANS

Kansas River Basin

2007

LERI

Lake Erie-Lake St. Clair Drainages

2004

LINJ

Long Island-New Jersey Coastal Drainages

2004

LIRB

Lower Illinois River Basin

2004

MISE

Mississippi Embayment

2004

MOBL

Mobile River Basin

2007

NECB

New England Coastal Basins

2007

NVBR

Nevada Basin and Range

2001

OZRK

Ozark Plateaus

2004

PODL

Potomac River Basin and Delmarva Peninsulac

2001

PUGT

Puget Sound Basin

2004

be monitored in rotation in three successive periods of high-intensity data collection that start in 2001, 2004, and 2007, respectively. The reduction in the number of Cycle II study units naturally raises questions of coverage and representativeness. The issue of how representative the study units are of the nation as a whole assumes even greater importance as NAWQA moves into Cycle II with a reduced number of study units but an emphasis on designing investigations predicated on process-based models (Mallard et al., 1999).

It is interesting to note that the Cycle I goal has often been stated as describing “the status and trends in the quality of the nation’s ground-water and surface-water resources” (Hirsch et al., 1988), while the Cycle II goal is stated as describing “water-quality conditions for a large part of the nation’s water resources” [emphasis added] (Gilliom et al., 2000a). The committee notes that the addition of the words “large part” is a significant and appropriate clarification of some earlier descriptions. In this regard, such inferences refer to the NAWQA study units, which are distributed across the nation but not clearly established to be “representative” of the nation. For the most part, recent written explanations of NAWQA results appear to be appropriately expressed; for example, Kolpin et



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