Appendix D Planning Group Biosketches

Martha Darling is an education policy consultant in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Prior to moving to Ann Arbor, she worked in senior management at The Boeing Company in Seattle, Washington, from which she is now retired. At Boeing, she had assignments with the Commercial Airplane Group and also served as corporate manager of education affairs. In this capacity, she supported the CEO and other executives in their leadership roles in public education reform at the state level and in Seattle. Ms. Darling is active in a variety of civic and community organizations, serving on the boards of Reed College, the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards and Student Testing, the White House Fellows Foundation, and the Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum. Ms. Darling has also participated in a number of activities with the National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academies. She was vice chair of the National Advisory Committee for the former NRC Center for Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education and served as vice chair of the advisory board of the NRC Center for Education.

Deborah Hughes Hallett is Professor of Mathematics at the University of Arizona. With Andrew M. Gleason at Harvard, she organized the Calculus Consortium based at Harvard, which brought together faculty from a wide variety of schools to improve undergraduate education in mathematics. With Gleason and other consortium members, Dr. Hughes Hallett has published several popular calculus textbooks that embody these improvements. Dr. Hughes Hallett is actively involved in discussions about the teaching of undergraduate mathematics at the national and international level. She is a member of the NRC’s Committee on Advanced Study in American High Schools and of the Mathematical Association of America Committee on Mutual Concerns. She was chair of the American Women in Mathematics group that provided feedback to the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics when the council developed national mathematics education standards.



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Enhancing Undergraduate Learning with Information Technology: A Workshop Summary Appendix D Planning Group Biosketches Martha Darling is an education policy consultant in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Prior to moving to Ann Arbor, she worked in senior management at The Boeing Company in Seattle, Washington, from which she is now retired. At Boeing, she had assignments with the Commercial Airplane Group and also served as corporate manager of education affairs. In this capacity, she supported the CEO and other executives in their leadership roles in public education reform at the state level and in Seattle. Ms. Darling is active in a variety of civic and community organizations, serving on the boards of Reed College, the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards and Student Testing, the White House Fellows Foundation, and the Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum. Ms. Darling has also participated in a number of activities with the National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academies. She was vice chair of the National Advisory Committee for the former NRC Center for Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education and served as vice chair of the advisory board of the NRC Center for Education. Deborah Hughes Hallett is Professor of Mathematics at the University of Arizona. With Andrew M. Gleason at Harvard, she organized the Calculus Consortium based at Harvard, which brought together faculty from a wide variety of schools to improve undergraduate education in mathematics. With Gleason and other consortium members, Dr. Hughes Hallett has published several popular calculus textbooks that embody these improvements. Dr. Hughes Hallett is actively involved in discussions about the teaching of undergraduate mathematics at the national and international level. She is a member of the NRC’s Committee on Advanced Study in American High Schools and of the Mathematical Association of America Committee on Mutual Concerns. She was chair of the American Women in Mathematics group that provided feedback to the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics when the council developed national mathematics education standards.

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Enhancing Undergraduate Learning with Information Technology: A Workshop Summary In 1998 she was co-chair of the International Conference on the Teaching of Mathematics in Samos, Greece, attended by faculty from 44 countries. Prior to this she established programs for mid-career master’s students at the Kennedy School of Government, precalculus, and quantitative reasoning courses (with Gleason), and courses for economics majors. She was awarded the Louise Hay Prize and elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for contributions to mathematics education. Marshall S. Smith is education program officer with the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, on leave from the School of Education at Stanford University. Dr. Smith is the former undersecretary and acting deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of Education. He trained originally in statistical techniques for research, and acquired extensive knowledge of policy issues through his years of academic experience. He has held key positions in government education policy during the 1970’s; researched topics including computer analysis of social science data, early child education, critical thinking, and social inequality; and taught at Harvard, Wisconsin, and Stanford. At Stanford, he was dean of the School of Education for six years. With this broad background, he is able to integrate research on policy questions from several disciplines and to focus on educational process, whether at the level of the individual student in the classroom or at the level of state and national educational reform. Dr. Smith is a member of the National Academy of Education, Co-Chair of the Pew Forum on Education Reform, and Principal Investigator of the Pew Network on District Reform. He participated in the NRC Committee on Information Technology and on the Center for Education’s Strategic Planning Advisory Group. Dr. Smith received his EdD degree in Measurement and Statistics at Harvard University in 1970. Jack Wilson is professor of management at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and CEO of UMassOnLine, which offers University of Massachusetts courses on the Internet. Formerly, Wilson was J. Eric Jonsson Distinguished Professor of Physics, Engineering Science, Information Technology, and Management at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and co-director of RPI’s Severino Center for Technological Entrepreneurship. He founded and was chairman of the board of Interactive Learning International (ILINC), and later became chief scientist of Mertergy Corporation. He joined the faculty of Rensselaer in 1990 and moved to the University of Massachusetts in 2001. Among the many awards he has won, Dr. Wilson received the Pew Charitable Trusts Leadership Award for Renewal of Undergraduate Education in 1996. Dr. Wilson has published numerous papers, one of which is “Re-engineering the Undergraduate Curriculum,” a book chapter for The Learning Revolution published by Anker Publishing Co. in 1997. Dr. Wilson received his A.B. from Thiel College in 1967, and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Kent State University in 1972.