Appendix
C
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Steven P. Gloss is the director of the Biological Resources Program at the Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center in Flagstaff, Arizona. Dr. Gloss is a member of the Water Science and Technology Board and was a member of the WSTB Committee on Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research. Dr. Gloss’ research interests include water resources policy and management, aquatic ecology, and fisheries science. He is currently studying these issues in the Platte River system. Dr. Gloss received his B.S. degree from Mount Union College, his M.S. degree from South Dakota State University, and his Ph.D. degree from the University of New Mexico.

Robert Davis has most recently been associated with the Institute of Behavioral Science at the University of Colorado. He was the head of the Economic Staff in the Office of the Secretary of the Interior for nine years. His areas of expertise are natural resource economics, environmental policy analysis, water resources planning, and methods of benefit-cost analysis. His Ph.D. thesis is generally considered the first publication on contingent valuation, a method in wide use today to quantify environmental benefits and damages. Dr. Davis has served as an advisor to foreign governments, has served in faculty positions at several universities and has served on the staff of Resources for the Future, Inc. Dr. Davis received his B.S. degree and his M.S. degree from the Ohio State University and the MPA and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University.

*Dr. Gloss accepted his current position in September, 2001. When this study began, he was with the University of Wyoming.



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The Missouri River Ecosystem: Exploring the Prospects for Recovery Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Steven P. Gloss is the director of the Biological Resources Program at the Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center in Flagstaff, Arizona. Dr. Gloss is a member of the Water Science and Technology Board and was a member of the WSTB Committee on Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research. Dr. Gloss’ research interests include water resources policy and management, aquatic ecology, and fisheries science. He is currently studying these issues in the Platte River system. Dr. Gloss received his B.S. degree from Mount Union College, his M.S. degree from South Dakota State University, and his Ph.D. degree from the University of New Mexico. Robert Davis has most recently been associated with the Institute of Behavioral Science at the University of Colorado. He was the head of the Economic Staff in the Office of the Secretary of the Interior for nine years. His areas of expertise are natural resource economics, environmental policy analysis, water resources planning, and methods of benefit-cost analysis. His Ph.D. thesis is generally considered the first publication on contingent valuation, a method in wide use today to quantify environmental benefits and damages. Dr. Davis has served as an advisor to foreign governments, has served in faculty positions at several universities and has served on the staff of Resources for the Future, Inc. Dr. Davis received his B.S. degree and his M.S. degree from the Ohio State University and the MPA and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University. *Dr. Gloss accepted his current position in September, 2001. When this study began, he was with the University of Wyoming.

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The Missouri River Ecosystem: Exploring the Prospects for Recovery David Ford is the chief executive officer of David Ford Consulting Engineers in Sacramento, California. Dr. Ford’s areas of expertise include hydrologic engineering, water resource systems analysis, and decision support systems. He has been a consultant to the U.S. federal and foreign governments and was a Fulbright scholarship recipient. Dr. Ford served on the WSTB Committee on Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research. He received his B.S. degree, his M.S. degree, and his Ph.D. degree, all in engineering, from the University of Texas. Gerald Galloway is the secretary of the United States Section of the International Joint Commission in Washington, D.C. Dr. Galloway has served as a consultant on a variety of water resources engineering and management issues to the Executive Office of the President, The World Bank, the Organization of American States, the TVA, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Dr. Galloway is a former dean of the Academic Board (Chief Academic Officer) of the United States Military Academy. Dr. Galloway holds master’s degrees from Princeton, Penn State, and the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. Dr. Galloway received his Ph.D. degree in geography from the University of North Carolina. Larry Hesse is the chief scientist and vice-president of River Ecosystems, Inc., and River Corporation, both located in Crofton, Nebraska. Mr. Hesse was previously employed as an aquatic research biologist and large river ecologist for the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission (1974– 1994). Mr. Hesse’s research experience has included work with the federal Upper Colorado River recovery program for endangered fish, as well as dozens of Missouri River fisheries studies for the federal government and private sector. He has authored roughly 100 journal papers, federal aid reports, books, and popular articles on Missouri River fisheries and water management. Mr. Hesse received his B. A. degree in ecology from Wayne State College and his M. A. degree in aquatic ecology from the University of South Dakota. Carter Johnson is a professor of ecology in the Department of Horticulture, Forestry, Landscape & Parks at South Dakota State University. Dr. Johnson’s primary research interests are in streamflow regulation and riparian ecosystems, restoration of ecological and economic sustainability of western rangelands, and global climate change and prairie wetlands. Dr. Johnson has conducted most of his research in the Missouri River Basin. He received the W. S. Cooper Award in 1996 from the Ecological Society of America. Dr. Johnson received his B.S. degree from Augustana College (Sioux Falls, SD) and his Ph.D. degree from North Dakota State University. Peggy Johnson is an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Johnson received the National Science Foundation Young Investigator Award in 1992 and cur-

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The Missouri River Ecosystem: Exploring the Prospects for Recovery rently serves on the Executive Committee of the American Society of Civil Engineers. Her research areas include river channel stability, hydraulic engineering, and river mechanics, on which she has authored dozens of peer-reviewed papers. Dr. Johnson received her B.S. degree from New Mexico State University and her M.S. degree and her Ph.D. degree from the University of Maryland. Kent Keenlyne is a retired wildlife manager who resides in Pierre, South Dakota. Dr. Keenlyne was a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Biologist from 1971 to 1996. Among other duties, Dr. Keenlyne served as the coordinator for the Upper Missouri River Conservation Committee and the Missouri River Coordinator for the seven state Missouri Natural Resources Committee. Dr. Keenlyne received his B.S. degree from the University of Wisconsin and his M.S. degree, M.A. degree, and Ph.D. degree from the University of Minnesota. Stephen S. Light is the Director of the Environment and Agriculture Program the Institute for Agricultural and Trade Policy in Minneapolis. As a Policy Director with the South Florida Water Management District in the early 1980s, Dr. Light helped introduce adaptive management into the management of the Florida Everglades, and helped develop an iterative testing process for reintroducing flows into the Shark River slough in Everglades National Park. Dr. Light was a co-editor of the widely cited 1995 volume on Barriers and Bridges to the Renewal of Ecosystems and Institutions. He received his B.S. degree from Thiel College, his M.S. degree from Penn State University, and his Ph.D. degree in natural resources policy and management from the University of Michigan. Ernest Smerdon (NAE) is recently retired vice-provost and dean of the College of Engineering and Mines at the University of Arizona. Dr. Smerdon has served as an advisor to the U.S. federal government and several foreign governments on water resources and agricultural development issues for four decades. He has authored over 100 professional papers on water resources planning, engineering, and irrigation. He has also served on several NRC committees and boards. Dr. Smerdon received his B.S. degree, his M.S. degree, and his Ph.D. degree, all in engineering, from the University of Missouri. A. Dan Tarlock holds an A.B. and LL. B. from Stanford University and is currently Distinguished Professor of Law and Associate Dean for Faculty at the Chicago-Kent College of Law. He has practiced law in San Francisco and Denver and taught at the University of Chicago, Indiana University, the University of Kansas, the University of Michigan, the University of Texas and the University of Utah. He has written and consulted widely in the fields of water law, environmental protection, and natural resources management. From 1987-1994 he was a member of the Water Science and Technology Board. From 1989-1992 he chaired the Committee on Western

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The Missouri River Ecosystem: Exploring the Prospects for Recovery Water Management Change, the report of which was published as Water Transfers in the West (1992). In 1997-1998, he served as the principal writer for the Western Policy Advisory Review Commission’s report, Water in the West. Professor Tarlock currently serves as one of the three United States legal advisors to the Secretariat of the Commission on Environmental Cooperation, established by the NAFTA Environmental Side Agreement. Robert Wetzel is a professor of biological sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research interests include the physiology and ecology of bacteria, algae, and higher aquatic plants; biogeochemical cycling in fresh waters; and functional roles of organic compounds and detritus in aquatic ecosystems. His professional experiences include positions as a professor at the University of Alabama, Michigan State University, Erlander National Professor of the Institute of Limnology of Uppsala University in Sweden, and a professor at the University of Michigan. Dr. Wetzel is an elected member of the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He earned his B.Sc. degree and his M.Sc. degree from the University of Michigan and his Ph.D. degree from the University of California at Davis. Jeffrey W. Jacobs is a senior program officer at the National Research Council’s Water Science and Technology Board. His research interests include organizational and policy arrangements for water resources planning, water resources science and policy relations, and international cooperation in water development. He has studied these issues extensively in Southeast Asia’s Mekong River basin and has conducted comparative research between water management issues in the United States and Southeast Asia. He received his Ph.D. degree in geography from the University of Colorado.

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