Another group of materials with potential interest as catalysts includes various carbides, nitrides, and borides of the transition metals.56 Such materials have the beneficial feature of high thermal stability and at the same time offer the possibility of having catalytic properties of a kind normally associated with precious metals.57,58 The further exploration of these materials in catalysis would appear to be worthwhile. An important aspect of research in this area is the development of methods for preparation of materials with high surface areas.

CONCLUSIONS

Catalysts are fascinating materials, embracing many different chemical compositions. The elucidation of their structures and surface properties provides exciting challenges for scientists. The development of new methods for probing catalytic materials has greatly extended our capabilities for investigation at a microscopic level. Such methods provide information to complement that obtained from more traditional studies of chemisorption, kinetics, and reaction mechanisms. The synthesis of new materials for application as catalysts is a continuing activity, with a great deal of opportunity for the future. On a long-term basis, the outlook for the field of catalysis is excellent.

NOTES

1.  

J.H.Sinfelt, Perkin Medal address in Chem. Ind., No. 11, pp. 403–406 (June 4, 1984).

2.  

G.Bylinsky, Fortune, pp. 82–88 (May 27, 1985).

3.  

J.H.Sinfelt, Science 195, 641 (1977).

4.  

J.H.Sinfelt, Sci. Am. 253 (3), 90 (1985).

5.  

J.H.Sinfelt, Rev. Mod. Phys. 51 (3), 569 (1979).

6.  

M.Boudart, Kinetics of Chemical Processes (Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, N.J., 1968), p. 61.

7.  

H.Voge and C.R.Adams, Adv. Catal. 17, 151 (1967).

8.  

J.H.Sinfelt, Adv. Catal. 23, 91 (1973).

9.  

J.H.Sinfelt, Catal. Rev. Sci. Eng. 9 (1), 147 (1974).

10.  

J.H.Sinfelt, Prog. Solid State Chem. 10 (2), 55 (1975).

11.  

G.H.Via, J.H.Sinfelt, and F.W.Lytle, J.Chem. Phys. 71, 690 (1979).

12.  

G.R.Wilson and W.K.Hall, J. Catal. 17, 190 (1970).

13.  

R.de L.Kronig, Z. Phys. 70, 317 (1931).

14.  

R.de L.Kronig, Z. Phys. 75, 191 (1932).

15.  

R.de L.Kronig, Z. Phys. 75, 468 (1932).

16.  

D.E.Sayers, F.W.Lytle, and E.A.Stern, Phys. Rev. Lett. 27, 1204 (1971).

17.  

F.W.Lytle, D.Sayers, and E.Stern, Phys. Rev. B 11, 4825 (1975).

18.  

B.M.Kincaid and P.Eisenberger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 34, 1361 (1975).

19.  

J.H.Sinfelt, G.H.Via, and F.W.Lytle, Catal. Rev. Sci. Eng. 26 (1), 81 (1984).

20.  

D.E.Sayers, F.W.Lytle, and E.A.Stern, Adv. X-Ray Anal. 13, 248 (1970).



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