Page 90

Appendix A

Workshop Agenda

The National Academies

BOARD ON TESTING AND ASSESSMENT

Workshop on Technology and Assessment: Thinking Ahead

Green Building Room 130, 2001 Wisconsin Avenue, NW

Wednesday, November 14, 2001

8:00 a.m.

Breakfast

8:30

Welcome and introductions

• Marshall (Mike) Smith, The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

• Michael Feuer, Director, NRC Center for Education

• Pat DeVito, Director, Board on Testing and Assessment

9:00

Advances in cognition, measurement, and technology highlighted in the National Research Council report Knowing What Students Know

Rethinking the foundations of assessment Jim Pellegrino, University of Illinois, Chicago

• Advances in the sciences of thinking and learning Rich Lehrer, University of Wisconsin

• Advances in measurement and statistical modeling Mark Wilson, University of California, Berkeley

• Assessment design and use and the role of technology Jim Pellegrino

• Reemphasizing an important message: The need for informative assessments Robert Glaser, Learning Research and Development Center, University of Pittsburgh

• A perspective from the sponsor Larry Suter, National Science Foundation

10:30

Break

10:45

Discussants

• Lorrie Shepard, University of Colorado

• Jose Mestre, University of Massachusetts

Followed by audience questions for panel

11:45

An example of the principles set forth in Knowing What Students Know : The Algebra I Cognitive Tutor

• Albert Corbett, Carnegie Mellon University



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OCR for page 90
Page 90 Appendix A Workshop Agenda The National Academies BOARD ON TESTING AND ASSESSMENT Workshop on Technology and Assessment: Thinking Ahead Green Building Room 130, 2001 Wisconsin Avenue, NW Wednesday, November 14, 2001 8:00 a.m. Breakfast 8:30 Welcome and introductions • Marshall (Mike) Smith, The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation • Michael Feuer, Director, NRC Center for Education • Pat DeVito, Director, Board on Testing and Assessment 9:00 Advances in cognition, measurement, and technology highlighted in the National Research Council report Knowing What Students Know • Rethinking the foundations of assessment Jim Pellegrino, University of Illinois, Chicago • Advances in the sciences of thinking and learning Rich Lehrer, University of Wisconsin • Advances in measurement and statistical modeling Mark Wilson, University of California, Berkeley • Assessment design and use and the role of technology Jim Pellegrino • Reemphasizing an important message: The need for informative assessments Robert Glaser, Learning Research and Development Center, University of Pittsburgh • A perspective from the sponsor Larry Suter, National Science Foundation 10:30 Break 10:45 Discussants • Lorrie Shepard, University of Colorado • Jose Mestre, University of Massachusetts Followed by audience questions for panel 11:45 An example of the principles set forth in Knowing What Students Know : The Algebra I Cognitive Tutor • Albert Corbett, Carnegie Mellon University

OCR for page 90
Page 91 12:00 noon Lunch Demonstration: The Algebra I Cognitive Tutor • Albert Corbett 1:00 p.m. Information technologies: Opportunities for advancing educational assessment • Session moderator Jim Pellegrino • Technology and the unmasking of constructs Drew Gitomer, Educational Testing Service • Surgical simulations and other learning systems that offer potentially rich assessment information Mike Russell, Boston College • Computerized speech recognition and the assessment of reading Susan Williams, University of Texas, Austin • Technology supports for developing assessments of science inquiry Barbara Means and Geneva Haertel, SRI International • Is it worth it? Cost benefits from technology-based assessment in the military Dexter Fletcher, Institute for Defense Analyses 3:00 Break 3:15 Discussants • Lauren Resnick, Learning Research and Development Center, University of Pittsburgh • Paul Holland, Educational Testing Service Followed by audience questions for panel 4:00 Group discussion of research and development priorities Discussion leader • Mike Smith Synthesizer • Michael Feuer 5:00 Adjourn