Allergic Disease

The committee concludes that there is weak evidence for bystander activation as a mechanism by which multiple immunizations under the U.S. infant immunization schedule could possibly influence an individual’s risk of allergy.

In the absence of experimental or human evidence regarding mechanisms related to the hygiene hypothesis as a means by which multiple immunizations under the U.S. infant immunization schedule could possibly influence an individual’s risk of allergy, the committee concludes that this mechanism is only theoretical.

The committee concludes that there is weak evidence for the existence of any biological mechanisms, collectively or individually, by which multiple immunizations under the U.S. infant immunization schedule could possibly influence an individual’s risk of allergy.

Heterologous Infection

The committee concludes that there is strong evidence for the existence of biological mechanisms by which multiple immunizations under the U.S. infant immunization schedule could possibly influence an individual’s risk for heterologous infections.

SIGNIFICANCE ASSESSMENT

Conclusions

The committee concludes that concern about multiple immunizations has been, and could continue to be, of societal significance in terms of parental worries, potential health burdens, and future challenges for immunization policy-making.

PUBLIC HEALTH RESPONSE RECOMMENDATIONS

Policy Review

The committee recommends that state and federal vaccine policymakers consider a broader and more explicit strategy for developing recommendations for the use of vaccines.

The committee does not recommend a policy review—by the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Committee on Infectious Diseases, and the American Academy of Family Physicians—of the current recommended childhood immunization schedule on the basis of concerns about immune system dysfunction.

The committee does not recommend a policy review by the Food and Drug Administration’s Vaccines and Related Biologic Products Advisory



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement