Appendixes



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Future R&D Environments: A Report for the National Institute of Standards and Technology Appendixes

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Future R&D Environments: A Report for the National Institute of Standards and Technology This page in the original is blank.

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Future R&D Environments: A Report for the National Institute of Standards and Technology A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Kenneth H. Keller, Chair, is director of the Center for Science, Technology, and Public Affairs and professor of chemical engineering and materials science, both at the University of Minnesota. His current research, writing, and teaching deal with a wide range of public policy issues arising out of and related to the influence of science and technology on international affairs, the development and adoption of high-technology approaches to health care, and the role of American institutions of higher education in research and development. He was a senior fellow for science and technology at the Council on Foreign Relations 1990-1996 and serves or has served on the boards of RAND’s Institute for Education & Training and the Science Museum of Minnesota. He earned his M.S. and Ph.D. (chemical engineering) from Johns Hopkins University. Milton Chang is with iNCUBiC, LLC. Before that, he was president of New Focus, Inc., which supplies photonics tools for laser applications and which he founded in 1990. He has incubated or is actively incubating 16 companies, including Uniphase and Gadzoox Networks. He currently serves on the boards of companies he has incubated, which span a broad spectrum of industries: Agility Communications, Arcturus Engineering, YesVideo.com, Euphonix, Iridex, Gadzoox Networks, New Focus, LightConnect, Lightwave Electronics, and Optical MicroMachines. He is active in the photonics community and has received a number of awards from professional societies. He writes monthly business columns for Laser Focus World and Photonics Spectra. From 1996 to 1998, Dr. Chang served on the Visiting Committee for Advanced Technology of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Dr. Chang holds a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology.

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Future R&D Environments: A Report for the National Institute of Standards and Technology William E. Coyne has been the senior scientist among 7000 researchers in 3M laboratories around the world, overseeing 30 different technology platforms. He joined 3M as a research chemist in 1968 and retired last year as senior vice president, R&D, and as a member of the company’s senior executive team. During his tenure as the senior architect of 3M’s R&D, the company invested more than $1 billion a year in research and significantly raised its new-product targets. 3M recently set a record of $1.4 billion in first-year new product sales and also received the coveted U.S. Medal of Technology from President Clinton. Dr. Coyne also sponsored the 3M Technical Forum, an organization of thousands of 3M researchers who meet periodically to share research, technology, and ideas. He earned his Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of Virginia and B.S. and M.S. degrees in pharmacy and pharmaceutical chemistry from the University of Toronto. James W. Dally (NAE) is Glen L. Martin Institute Professor of Engineering emeritus at the University of Maryland, College Park. Dr. Dally, a mechanical engineer, has had a distinguished career in industry, government, and academia. His former positions include dean of the College of Engineering at the University of Rhode Island, senior research engineer at Armour Research Foundation, professor and assistant director of research at the Illinois Institute of Technology, and senior engineer at IBM. He is author or coauthor of six books, including engineering textbooks on experimental stress analysis, engineering design, instrumentation, and the packaging of electronic systems and has published approximately 200 research papers. He earned his B.S. and M.S. from Carnegie Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. from the Illinois Institute of Technology. Charles P. DeLisi is Metcalf Professor of Science and Engineering at Boston University (BU) and also served as dean of the College of Engineering from 1990 to 2000. Prior to moving to BU, he was professor and chair of biomathematical sciences at Mount Sinai Medical School (1987-1999), director of the Department of Energy’s Health and Environmental Research Programs (1985-1987), section chief at NIH (1975-1985), and Theoretical Division Staff Scientist at Los Alamos (1972-1975). He has authored or coauthored more than 200 scientific papers and has five patents. Dr. DeLisi is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineers and is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Smithsonian Platinum Technology Laureate, the Department of Energy’s Distinguished Associate Award from Secretary Richardson and the Presidential Citizen’s Medal, awarded to him in January 2000 by President Clinton for initiating the Human Genome Project. His B.S. (from City College of New York) and his Ph.D. (from New York University) are both in physics; his postdoctoral training (at Yale) was in chemistry. C. William Gear (NAE) is former president of NEC Research Institute. Prior to joining NEC in 1990, he was head of the Department of Computer Science and professor of computer science and applied mathematics at the University of Illi-

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Future R&D Environments: A Report for the National Institute of Standards and Technology nois at Urbana-Champaign. His research expertise is in numerical analysis and computational software. He is an IEEE fellow, served as president of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), and was a recipient of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) SIGNUM George E. Forsythe Memorial Award as well as Fulbright and Johnson Foundation fellowships. He earned his B.A. from Cambridge University and his M.S. and Ph.D. (mathematics) from the University of Illinois. Roy Levin is now with Microsoft Corporation, where he is the director of its Silicon Valley Research Lab. Before that, he was director of the System Research Center at Compaq, where he worked since the company’s founding by Digital Equipment Corporation in 1984. Prior to that he was a principal scientist at Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), where he was a principal developer of Cedar, an integrated programming environment, and Grapevine, one of the earliest e-mail systems. Dr. Levin earned his B.S. in mathematics at Yale University and his Ph.D. in computer science at Carnegie Mellon University. He is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery and author or coauthor of approximately 20 technical papers, books, and patents. Richard L. Popp is professor of medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, where he has taught since 1971. Dr. Popp has directed the Stanford-Israeli Visiting Professors Program since 1984, is a member of the New York Academy of Sciences and the California Academy of Medicine, and is active in a number of professional associations. He was honored by the American Society of Echocardiography with the creation of its Richard L. Popp Master Teacher Award, to be presented annually. He earned his B.A. and M.D. degrees from Johns Hopkins University and its School of Medicine. Nathan Rosenberg is Fairleigh S. Dickinson, Jr., Professor of Public Policy in the Economics Department at Stanford University. His research interests encompass the economics of technological change, the economic role of science, and economic history and development, with current interests including the role of scientific knowledge in influencing the rate and direction of technological change, determinants of technological change in the chemical and medical sectors, and the economic performance of high-tech industries. Recent books include Technology and the Pursuit of Economic Growth, 1989 (with David Mowery); Exploring the Black Box, 1994; and The Emergence of Economic Ideas, 1994. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin and his A.B. from Rutgers University. Thomas A. Saponas is a senior vice president and CTO of Agilent Technologies as well as director of Agilent Laboratories. His responsibilities include developing the company’s long-term technology strategy and overseeing the alignment of the company’s objectives with its centralized R&D activities. He has more than 27 years of experience in electrical engineering refined over the course of his career with Hewlett-Packard Company, where he began in 1972 as a design engineer in the company’s Automatic Measurement Division and went

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Future R&D Environments: A Report for the National Institute of Standards and Technology on to become vice president and general manager of the Electronic Instruments Group. In 1986, Mr. Saponas was selected to serve as a White House fellow and served as special assistant to the Secretary of the Navy for a year, on leave from Hewlett-Packard. He earned a B.S. in electrical engineering and computer science and an M.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Colorado.