jet aircraft for business aviation have increased demand for professional-grade pilots. Substantially greater effort and expense are required to attain and maintain the necessary proficiency levels for piloting jet aircraft than are required for private pilots operating small, piston-engine aircraft.

REFERENCES

Abbreviations

FAA Federal Aviation Administration

GAMA General Aviation Manufacturers Association

NATA National Air Transportation Association

NBAA National Business Aviation Association

RAA Regional Airline Association


FAA. 1989. Aviation Forecasts Fiscal Years 1989–2000. U.S. Department of Transportation, Washington, D.C.

FAA. 2000a. 2000 Aviation Capacity Enhancement Plan. U.S. Department of Transportation, Washington, D.C.

FAA. 2000b. Aerospace Forecasts Fiscal Years 2000–2011. U.S. Department of Transportation, Washington, D.C.

FAA. 2000c. Annual Report 2000. U.S. Department of Transportation, Washington, D.C. Federal Register. 2001. Vol. 66, No. 138, pp. 37,520–37,561.

GAMA. 1999a. 1999 General Aviation Statistical Databook. Washington, D.C.

GAMA. 1999b. GAMA Almanac: A Look at the Past 10 Years of General Aviation Production Airplane Shipments and Billings. Washington, D.C.

NATA. 1999. Aviation Businesses and the Services They Provide. Washington, D.C.

NBAA. 2000. Business Aviation Factbook 2000. Washington, D.C.

RAA. 1999, 2000. RAA Annual Report. Washington, D.C.



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