Appendix:
Biographies of Presenters

Nicholas Belkin has been professor of information science in the School of Communication, Information, and Library Studies at Rutgers University since 1985. Prior to that appointment, he was lecturer and then senior lecturer in the Department of Information Science at the City University, London, from 1975. He has held visiting positions at the University of Western Ontario, the Free University of Berlin, and the Integrated Publication and Information Systems Institute of the German National Research Center for Computer Science and was visiting scientist at the Institute of Systems Science of the National University of Singapore and a Fulbright Fellow at the Department of Information Studies, University of Tampere, Finland. Professor Belkin was chair of the ACM Special Interest Group on Information Retrieval from 1995 to 1999 and is a member of the Steering Committee for the ACM/IEEE Joint Conferences on Digital Libraries. He received his Ph.D. in information studies from the University of London in 1977 and a master’s in librarianship from the University of Washington in 1970.

Michel Bilello holds a Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering and an M.D. degree, both from Stanford University. His most recent research includes security mediation for secure dissemination of medical information. He has recently completed his internship in internal medicine.

Fred Cotton is director of training services for SEARCH, the National Consortium for Justice Information and Statistics. He provides technical assistance and training to local, state, and federal criminal justice agencies nationwide in information systems, including assistance in computer



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Technical, Business, and Legal Dimensions of Protecting Children from Pornography on the Internet: Proceedings of a Workshop Appendix: Biographies of Presenters Nicholas Belkin has been professor of information science in the School of Communication, Information, and Library Studies at Rutgers University since 1985. Prior to that appointment, he was lecturer and then senior lecturer in the Department of Information Science at the City University, London, from 1975. He has held visiting positions at the University of Western Ontario, the Free University of Berlin, and the Integrated Publication and Information Systems Institute of the German National Research Center for Computer Science and was visiting scientist at the Institute of Systems Science of the National University of Singapore and a Fulbright Fellow at the Department of Information Studies, University of Tampere, Finland. Professor Belkin was chair of the ACM Special Interest Group on Information Retrieval from 1995 to 1999 and is a member of the Steering Committee for the ACM/IEEE Joint Conferences on Digital Libraries. He received his Ph.D. in information studies from the University of London in 1977 and a master’s in librarianship from the University of Washington in 1970. Michel Bilello holds a Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering and an M.D. degree, both from Stanford University. His most recent research includes security mediation for secure dissemination of medical information. He has recently completed his internship in internal medicine. Fred Cotton is director of training services for SEARCH, the National Consortium for Justice Information and Statistics. He provides technical assistance and training to local, state, and federal criminal justice agencies nationwide in information systems, including assistance in computer

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Technical, Business, and Legal Dimensions of Protecting Children from Pornography on the Internet: Proceedings of a Workshop crimes investigations and examining seized microcomputers. He instructs a variety of technology crimes courses that SEARCH offers at its National Criminal Justice Computer Laboratory and Training Center in Sacramento, California, and at other sites nationwide, and he oversees a training staff of eight. He has also taught advanced officer courses and officer safety subjects in the Basic Police Academy and was an invited guest of Norway’s National Bureau of Criminal Investigation, where he provided training on computer investigations. Mr. Cotton has 13 years of full-time law enforcement service as a field supervisor with experience in operations, investigations, records, training, and data processing. In addition to his duties at SEARCH, he is a reserve police officer with the Yuba City, California, Police Department, where he is assigned to the Sacramento Valley High-Tech Crimes Task Force, and a specialist reserve officer with the Los Angeles Police Department, where he is assigned to the Organized Crime and Vice Division. Mr. Cotton is a member of the Florida Computer Crime Investigators Association, the Forensic Association of Computer Technicians, the Northern California Chapter of the High Technology Crime Investigation Association (HTCIA), the National Technical Investigators Association, the Georgia High-Tech Crime Consortium, the Midwestern Electronic Crime Investigation Association, the American Society of Law Enforcement Trainers, and Police Futurist International. He is a former member of the National Board of Directors of HTCIA. In September 1999, the International Board of Directors of HTCIA selected him as the first recipient of its Distinguished Achievement Award. Mr. Cotton is certified by the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training as a “computer / white-collar crime investigator” for the State of California through the Robert J. Presley Institute of Criminal Investigation (ICI), and he is an ICI-certified instructor. He is also a graduate of and has been a guest instructor at the “Seized Computer Evidence Recovery Specialist” training course offered through the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Glynco, Georgia, and he has qualified and testified as an expert witness on computer investigations in both county and federal courts. Mr. Cotton holds a degree in administration of justice and is an adjunct professor in the forensic computer investigation certificate program of the University of New Haven, Connecticut. Donald Eastlake has over 30 years of experience in the computer field and was one of the principal architects and specification authors for the Domain Name System security protocol. He co-chairs the joint IETF/W3C XML Digital Signature Working Group, chairs the e-commerce-oriented IETF TRADE Working Group, is a member of and co-editor of the specification for the W3C XML Encryption Working Group, and a member of the Java Community group developing XML Security APIs. He is a mem-

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Technical, Business, and Legal Dimensions of Protecting Children from Pornography on the Internet: Proceedings of a Workshop ber of the technical staff at Motorola and has previously worked for IBM, CyberCash, Digital Equipment Corporation, Transfinite Systems Company, Computer Corporation of America, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Susan Getgood is one of corporate America’s leading experts on education and Internet safety. She has testified on behalf of the industry before Congress, the National Research Council, the Federal Trade Commission, and the Children’s Online Protection Act Commission. Prior to assuming her current role, she served as the Learning Company’s director of corporate communications, where she developed a broad knowledge of the role of technology in teaching both children and adults. She previously was director of marketing at Microsystems Software, the company that developed Cyber Patrol Internet filtering software. She represented Microsystems Software when it was among the coalition of plaintiffs who successfully challenged the constitutionality of the Communications Decency Act in 1996. In December 1997, she was part of a panel on Internet filtering and other technologies to protect children at the White House-backed “Internet/Online Summit: Focus on Kids.” She has been involved in issues related to creating positive digital content for children and the development of quality educational content for homes and schools. She is on the Board of Directors of Mass Networks and was recently named to the Executive Committee of this public-private partnership dedicated to enhancing education through technology in the state of Massachusetts. Bennett Haselton has been publishing reports on the workings of Internet blocking software since 1996. His Web site at Peacefire.org has functioned as a clearinghouse of information related to Internet blocking software and has been featured in reports on CNN, CourtTV, CNNfn, MTV News, and MSNBC. Bennett holds an M.A. in mathematics from Vanderbilt University and lives in Seattle. He currently works as a “contract hacker,” finding security holes in Internet applications on a commission basis. Chris Kelly has served in a variety of business, educational, and governmental roles over the past 10 years aimed at bettering the ways we provide customer service, teach our children, and live our everyday lives online. Currently chief privacy officer for Excite@Home, the leading broadband online service provider, he is responsible for the company’s privacy policy and practices, working with public policy makers and industry leaders on consumer privacy initiatives and educating the public regarding the company’s commitment to online privacy. He brings extensive experience in information technology, law, and public policy to his role at Excite@Home. At Kendara, a 40-person next-generation digital

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Technical, Business, and Legal Dimensions of Protecting Children from Pornography on the Internet: Proceedings of a Workshop marketing startup acquired by Excite@Home in 2000, he served as one of the online industry’s first chief privacy officers, overseeing product architecture development and data management practices to ensure consumer privacy. Prior to Kendara, he was an attorney in the Antitrust and Intellectual Property groups at Palo Alto law firm Wilson, Sonsini, Goodrich & Rosati, where he counseled numerous Internet companies on privacy policies, terms of service, and other Web site service concerns. At Wilson Sonsini, he also advised numerous Silicon Valley companies on the implications of the government’s antitrust suit against Microsoft and on the application of intellectual property concepts in the digital age. As a fellow of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Law School, he worked on a variety of Internet public policy issues, including spam prevention, privacy protection, and technology’s impact on education. He has also taught cyberspace law as an adjunct professor at the California Western School of Law in San Diego. In the community, he serves on the board of directors of Greatschools.net, a not-for-profit online “Zagat’s Guide” to every school in California and Arizona, assisting the company’s nationwide expansion efforts. He also participates in the Palo Alto Area Bar Association’s Lawyers in the Schools program, teaching high school students basic legal concepts through interactive role playing exercises. He is a member of the State Bar of California and the American Bar Association. He has served as a policy analyst for the White House Domestic Policy Council and as a special assistant at the U.S. Department of Education. He holds a J.D. from Harvard Law School, a master’s degree in political science from Yale University, and a B.A. from Georgetown University, where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. At Harvard, he was editor in chief of the Harvard Journal of Law and Technology and was part of the founding team for the Berkman Center for Internet & Society. Ray Larson specializes in the design and performance evaluation of information retrieval systems and the evaluation of user interaction with those systems. His background includes work as a programmer/analyst with the University of California (UC) Division of Library Automation, where he was involved in the design, development, and performance evaluation of the UC public access online union catalog (MELVYL). His research has concentrated on the design and evaluation of information retrieval systems. He is the designer of the Cheshire II information retrieval system, which is being used as a search engine at numerous sites in the United States and Europe. The ranking algorithms developed in the Cheshire II project are the basis of the Inktomi search engine used by Yahoo and other World Wide Web search portals. He was a faculty investigator on the Sequoia 2000 project, where he was involved in the design and evaluation of a very-large-scale, network-based information system to support the

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Technical, Business, and Legal Dimensions of Protecting Children from Pornography on the Internet: Proceedings of a Workshop information needs of scientists studying global change. He is also a faculty investigator on the UC Berkeley Environmental Digital Library Project (sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)), where the work is continuing on a very large environmental information system providing access to information on the California environment. He is the principal investigator on the International Digital Libraries Initiative sponsored by NSF and the Joint Information Systems Committee in the United Kingdom. He is a coprincipal investigator on other projects sponsored by DARPA and the Institute for Museum and Library Studies. He has consulted on information retrieval systems and automatic classification methods with major corporations, including Sun Microsystems, American Express, and Inktomi. He has also consulted on international information system projects in the United States and the United Kingdom, including the Networked Social Science Tools and Resources project and the “Archives Hub” linking archival collections in U.K. research libraries. David Lewis is a consultant based in Chicago, Illinois. He works in the areas of information retrieval, machine learning, and natural language processing. Prior to taking up consulting, he was a researcher at AT&T Labs and Bell Labs and a research faculty member at the University of Chicago. Lewis received his Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 1992 and has undergraduate degrees in computer science and mathematics from Michigan State University. He has published more than 40 papers, holds 5 patents, and helped to design the U.S. Government Message Understanding Conference and Text Retrieval Conference evaluations of language processing technology. David Maher has served as chief technology officer of InterTrust since July 1999. Before joining InterTrust, he was an AT&T fellow, division manager, and head of the Secure Systems Research Department at AT&T Labs, where he was working on secure IP networks and secure electronic commerce protocols. He joined Bell Labs in 1981, where he developed secure wideband transmission systems, cryptographic key management systems, and secure communications devices. He was chief architect for AT&T’s STU-III secure voice, data, and video products used by the White House and U.S. intelligence and military personnel for top secret communications. In 1992 Maher was made a Bell Labs fellow in recognition of his work on communications security. He was also chief scientist for AT&T Secure Communications Systems overseeing secure systems R&D at Bell Labs, Gretag Data systems in Zurich, and Datotek Systems in Dallas. In 1993, Maher designed the Information Vending Encryption System used to provide a “virtual VCR” video pay-per-view system for cable networks.

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Technical, Business, and Legal Dimensions of Protecting Children from Pornography on the Internet: Proceedings of a Workshop In 1995, he worked with AT&T Universal Card Services, where he designed and analyzed a number of electronic payment systems and served as a member of the Mondex International Security Group. He has published papers in the fields of combinatorics, cryptography, number theory, signal processing, and electronic commerce. He has been a consultant to the National Science Foundation, National Security Agency, National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment. He has a Ph.D. in mathematics from Lehigh University, and he has taught electrical engineering, mathematics, and computer science at several institutions and was an associate professor of mathematics at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. He currently serves on the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board committee investigating networked systems of embedded computers. Deirdre Mulligan is acting clinical professor of law and director of the Samuelson Law, Technology, and Public Policy Clinic at the Boalt Hall School of Law, University of California at Berkeley. Prior to joining Boalt, she was staff counsel at the Center for Democracy and Technology, where she focused on privacy and First Amendment issues. She serves on the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board committee studying authentication techniques and their implications for privacy. Brian Pass is a partner with the law firm of Brown, Raysman, Millstein, Felder, and Steiner LLP, heading the firm’s West Coast technology practice from its Los Angeles office. Mr. Pass represents clients in the licensing, development, and distribution of computer software; hardware development and OEM relationships; new media and Web site licensing, development, and marketing; intellectual property and trade secret protection; broadband communications; interactive television; and e-commerce. Mr. Pass counsels companies on start-up formation and venture capital finance, joint venture formation, and mergers and acquisitions. He also advises companies on Internet privacy and other regulatory issues affecting new media and e-commerce. Before joining Brown Raysman, he served as president, chief executive officer, and co-founder of Passport New Media, where he led the development of Passport’s critically acclaimed children’s Internet service, Your Own World. At Passport, he raised $7.5 million in venture capital and led a team of over 30 employees, while concluding numerous third-party content partnerships and negotiating key technology and distribution relationships. He also served as vice president and general counsel at Americast, a joint venture of the Walt Disney Corporation and several of the Baby Bell telephone companies, to develop interactive digital television systems. In addition to advising the Americast partnership and its board on all general corporate matters, he negotiated and administered numerous technology purchas-

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Technical, Business, and Legal Dimensions of Protecting Children from Pornography on the Internet: Proceedings of a Workshop ing and licensing agreements, including a $1 billion set-top box purchase agreement; an $80 million dollar hardware purchase agreement; a multimillion dollar intellectual property licensing agreement; and numerous software development and licensing agreements. He graduated from Wesleyan University in 1986 with high honors in the College of Social Studies and received his J.D. from the UCLA School of Law in 1991. Hinrich Schütze is chief technical officer and co-founder of Novation Biosciences, a data and text mining company serving the pharmaceutical industry. He was formerly co-founder and Vice president of advanced development for Outride, Inc., where he applied state-of-the-art relevance technology to the challenge of information retrieval. Eddie Zeitler was a senior vice president at Charles Schwab & Co., Inc., through March 2001, where for 5 years he managed the Information Security Department, which comprised six specialized units: Information Access and Protection, Information Security Technology, Information Security Risk Management, Information Security Strategy and Architecture, Business Contingency Planning, and Security Awareness and Training. Mr. Zeitler has a varied background in computers and information processing. Prior to Charles Schwab, he managed the information security functions at Fidelity Investments, Bank of America, and Security Pacific National Bank. Other management positions include the capacity planning function for Security Pacific National Bank’s computer centers, technical services (operating systems and software) and computer center operations for the National Data Center of Federated Department Stores, and data center performance and configuration for Transamerica Information Services. He began his career developing the operating system used on the Shuttle Orbiter at Rockwell International and radar system controls at ITT Gilfillan. External activities include participation on various committees such as the Los Angeles County Computer Crime Task Force, the Department of the Treasury’s Financial Management Services Security Advisory Panel, the ANSI X9.E9 and X9.F2 Working Groups for Security of Financial Systems, the U.S. Treasury’s Electronic Funds Transfer Task Force Subcommittee on Interoperability, the ABA Information Systems Security Committee, the (ISC)2 Qualifications Review Committee, the National Computer System Security and Privacy Advisory Board, and the National Research Council’s Panel for Information Technology that annually reviews the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s information technology program. Mr. Zeitler is a registered brokerage representative (Series 7 and Series 63) and is a certified information systems security professional. He holds a B.S. in mathematics and an M.S. in systems engineering from the University of Arizona. He also completed his Ph.D. candidacy in computer science at the University of Alberta.