Appendix B
Biographical Information on The Committee on Ungulate Management in Yellowstone National Park

David R.Klein (Chair) is Emeritus Professor, Institute of Arctic Biology and Department of Biology and Wildlife at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. He earned his B.S. in zoology/wildlife at the University of Connecticut, M.S. in wildlife management from the University of Alaska, and Ph.D. in zoology/ecology at the University of British Columbia. Dr. Klein’s research interests include ungulate ecology, with emphasis on forage relationships, and land-use policy and resource management in the north. He was a member of the NRC Committee on Management of Wolf and Bear Populations in Alaska.

Dale R.McCullough (Vice Chair) is Professor of Wildlife Biology in the Ecosystem Sciences Division of the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management and Resource Conservation in the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology at the University of California, Berkeley, where he holds the A.Starker Leopold endowed chair. He received his B.S. in wildlife management from South Dakota State University, M.S. in wildlife management from Oregon State University, and Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Califor-



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Ecological Dynamics on Yellowstone’s Northern Range Appendix B Biographical Information on The Committee on Ungulate Management in Yellowstone National Park David R.Klein (Chair) is Emeritus Professor, Institute of Arctic Biology and Department of Biology and Wildlife at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. He earned his B.S. in zoology/wildlife at the University of Connecticut, M.S. in wildlife management from the University of Alaska, and Ph.D. in zoology/ecology at the University of British Columbia. Dr. Klein’s research interests include ungulate ecology, with emphasis on forage relationships, and land-use policy and resource management in the north. He was a member of the NRC Committee on Management of Wolf and Bear Populations in Alaska. Dale R.McCullough (Vice Chair) is Professor of Wildlife Biology in the Ecosystem Sciences Division of the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management and Resource Conservation in the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology at the University of California, Berkeley, where he holds the A.Starker Leopold endowed chair. He received his B.S. in wildlife management from South Dakota State University, M.S. in wildlife management from Oregon State University, and Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Califor-

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Ecological Dynamics on Yellowstone’s Northern Range nia, Berkeley. His research interests concern the behavior, ecology, conservation, and management of large mammals. Dr. McCullough has served on four NAS/NRC committees reviewing wildlife issues, most recently as Principal Investigator on the study Brucellosis in the Greater Yellowstone Area. Barbara H.Allen-Diaz is Professor of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management at the University of California, Berkeley. She received her A.B. in anthropology, M.S. in range management, and Ph.D. in wildland resource science from the University of California, Berkeley. Her research interests include plant community succession and classification, meadow, hardwood rangeland ecology, forest grazing, hydrology, and range management. Norman F.Cheville is Dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Iowa State University. He received a D.V.M. from Iowa State University and M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin. In 1968, he served a sabbatical year at the National Institute for Medical Research, London, studying under Anthony Allison. The honorary degree Doctor Honoris Causa was conferred by the University of Liége in 1986 for outstanding work in veterinary pathology. Dr. Cheville served as Principal Investigator on the NRC study Brucellosis in the Greater Yellowstone Area. Russell W.Graham is Chief Curator at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin. His research interests include the evolution and biogeography of Quaternary mammal communities. He currently serves on the NRC’s U.S. National Committee for the International Union for Quaternary Research and the National Committee for DIVERSITAS. John E.Gross is Senior Research Scientist with the Division of Sustainable Ecosystems, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia, and Research Associate with the Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University. He earned his B.A. from the University of Colorado in biology, M.S. in zoology from Colorado State University, and Ph.D. in ecology from the University of California, Davis. Dr. Gross’s research interests include conservation biology, ecological modeling, and the population and nutritional ecology of herbivores. James A.MacMahon is Trustee Professor of Biology at Utah State University. He earned his B.S. in zoology at Michigan State University and Ph.D. in

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Ecological Dynamics on Yellowstone’s Northern Range biology at the University of Notre Dame. His research interests include theory of community organization, community ecology of deserts, biology of desert perennials, energy exchange in plant and animal populations, biology of reptiles and amphibians, and biology of arachnids. Dr. MacMahon is currently a member of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology and the Committee on Future Roles, Challenges, and Opportunities for the U.S. Geological Survey. Nancy E.Mathews is Assistant Professor, Department of Wildlife Ecology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Her research interests include behavioral ecology, conservation biology, and large-scale assessments of biodiversity. Dr. Mathews received her B.S. in biology from Pennsylvania State University, M.S. in forest biology (wildlife management) and Ph.D. in forest biology (ecology) from the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY-CESF). Duncan T.Patten is Research Professor in the Big Sky Institute at Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana. He is also Professor Emeritus of Plant Biology and past director of the Center for Environmental Studies at Arizona State University. Dr. Patten received an A.B. from Amherst College, M.S. from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and Ph.D. from Duke University. His research interests include arid and mountain ecosystems, especially the understanding of ecological processes and restoration of western riparian and wetland ecosystems. He has been a member of the NRC’s Commission on Geoscience, Environment and Resources, the Board on Environmental Studies, and numerous NAS/NRC committees. Katherine Rails is a research zoologist at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. She has a B.A. from Stanford University, an M.A. from Radcliffe College, and a Ph.D. in biology from Harvard University. Her areas of expertise are the biology of mammals, mammalian behavior, conservation biology, the genetic problems of small captive and wild populations, field studies of threatened and endangered species, and the development and testing of decision-making tools to improve management of threatened and endangered species. Dr. Rails served previously on the NRC’s Committee on Scientific Issues in the Endangered Species Act. Monica G.Turner is Professor of Terrestrial Ecology in the Department of

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Ecological Dynamics on Yellowstone’s Northern Range Zoology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She received her Ph.D. in ecology from the University of Georgia. Her research interests include landscape ecology, ecological modeling, and natural disturbance dynamics. Currently, she serves on the NRC’s Ecosystems Panel. Previously, she served on the NRC’s Committee on Scientific and Technical Criteria for Federal Acquisition of Lands for Conservation. Elizabeth S.Williams is Professor, Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Wyoming, and a veterinary pathologist at the Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory. She received a BS in zoology from the University of Maryland at College Park, D.V.M. in veterinary medicine from Purdue University, and Ph.D. in veterinary pathology from Colorado State University.