Appendix D
Biographical Sketches of Members of Committee on Hydrologic Science

Dara Entekhabi (chair) is an associate professor in the Department of Civil and Environ-mental Engineering and the Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests are in the basic understanding of coupled surface, subsurface, and atmospheric hydrologic systems that may form the bases for enhanced hydrologic predictability. Specifically, he conducts research in land–atmosphere interactions, remote sensing, physical hydrology, operational hydrology, hydrometeorology, groundwater–surface water interaction, and hillslope hydrology. He received his B.A. and M.A. degrees from Clark University. Dr. Entekhabi received his Ph.D. degree in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Mary P. Anderson is a professor in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Her current research interests include the effects of potential global climate change on groundwater–lake systems and quantifying groundwater recharge. Dr. Anderson received a B.A. degree in geology from the State University of New York at Buffalo and a Ph.D. degree in hydrology from Stanford University. She is a former member of the Water Science and Technology Board.

Roni Avissar is professor and chair of the Department of Environmental Sciences and director of the Center for Environmental Predic-



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Report of a Workshop on Predictability & Limits-to-Prediction in Hydrologic Systems Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Members of Committee on Hydrologic Science Dara Entekhabi (chair) is an associate professor in the Department of Civil and Environ-mental Engineering and the Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests are in the basic understanding of coupled surface, subsurface, and atmospheric hydrologic systems that may form the bases for enhanced hydrologic predictability. Specifically, he conducts research in land–atmosphere interactions, remote sensing, physical hydrology, operational hydrology, hydrometeorology, groundwater–surface water interaction, and hillslope hydrology. He received his B.A. and M.A. degrees from Clark University. Dr. Entekhabi received his Ph.D. degree in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Mary P. Anderson is a professor in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Her current research interests include the effects of potential global climate change on groundwater–lake systems and quantifying groundwater recharge. Dr. Anderson received a B.A. degree in geology from the State University of New York at Buffalo and a Ph.D. degree in hydrology from Stanford University. She is a former member of the Water Science and Technology Board. Roni Avissar is professor and chair of the Department of Environmental Sciences and director of the Center for Environmental Predic-

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Report of a Workshop on Predictability & Limits-to-Prediction in Hydrologic Systems tion at Rutgers University. His research focuses on the study of land–atmosphere interactions from micro to global scales, including the development and use of a variety of atmospheric, land, and oceanic models. Dr. Avissar received his B.S. degree in soil and water science, his M.S. degree in micrometeorology, and his Ph.D. degree in mesoscale meteorology from the Hebrew University in Israel. He is editor of Journal of Geophysical Research-Climate and Physics of the Atmosphere. Roger C. Bales is a professor in the Department of Hydrology and Water Resources at the University of Arizona. Dr. Bales conducts research on the hydrology and biogeochemistry of alpine areas, polar snow and ice, and water quality. He received his B.S. degree from Purdue University, his M.S. degree from the University of California, Berkeley, and his Ph.D. degree from the California Institute of Technology. George M. Hornberger (National Academy of Engineering) is the Ernest H. Ern Professor of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia. His current research interests include hydrogeochemical response of small catchments and transport of colloids in porous media. He is chair of the Water Cycle Study Group of the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Dr. Hornberger is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and a member of the Geological Society of America. He has served on numerous NRC boards and committees, including chairing the Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources. He served as editor of Water Resources Research from 1993 to 1997. He obtained his B.S. (1965) and M.S. (1967) degrees in civil engineering from Drexel University and his Ph.D. degree from Stanford University in hydrology in 1970. William K. Nuttle is an independent consultant in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Until recently, he was director of Everglades Department, South Florida Water Management District, and was executive officer for the Florida Bay Science Program immediately prior to that. An expert in ecohydrology of wetlands and environmental science, he has coordinated extensive estuarine and wetlands research programs in South Florida. Currently, he is visiting scholar at the Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University. Previously, he held positions with Me-

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Report of a Workshop on Predictability & Limits-to-Prediction in Hydrologic Systems morial University of Newfoundland and the University of Virginia. Dr. Nuttle has also consulted widely on topics generally related to coastal, wetland hydrology and the interface between research and environmental management. He is a member of the Committee on Hydrologic Science. Dr. Nuttle received his M.S. degree and Ph.D. (1986) degree in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his BSCE degree from the University of Maryland. Marc B. Parlange is a professor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. His primary research interest is in hydrology and fluid mechanics in the environment, especially questions of land–atmosphere interaction, turbulence and the atmospheric boundary layer, watershed-scale hydrology, and vadose zone transport processes. Dr. Parlange received his B.S. degree from Griffith University (Brisbane, Australia), and his M.S. degree in agricultural engineering, and his Ph.D. degree in civil and environmental engineering from Cornell University. Kenneth W. Potter is a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His teaching and research interests are in hydrology and water resources, including hydrologic modeling, estimation of hydrologic risk, estimation of hydrologic budgets, watershed monitoring and assessment, and hydrologic restoration. Dr. Potter is a past member of the Water Science and Technology Board and has served on many of its committees. He received his B.S. degree in geology from Louisiana State University and his Ph.D. in geography and environmental engineering from Johns Hopkins University. John O. Roads is director of the Scripps Experimental Climate Prediction Center of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego. His research focuses on surface water and energy budgets, regional and global climate change, and medium- and long-range weather prediction using modeling and observation. He was a member of the NRC’s Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Panel from 1993 to 2000, and most recently chaired the panel. He is a member of the AGU Precipitation Committee. He has been named

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Report of a Workshop on Predictability & Limits-to-Prediction in Hydrologic Systems to advisory panels for the National Climate Data Center and the National Meteorological Center. He received a B.A. degree in physics in 1972 from the University of Colorado and a Ph.D. degree in meteorology in 1977 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge. John L. Wilson is professor of hydrology and chair of the Department of Earth and Environmental Science at New Mexico Tech, Socorro. He studies fluid flow and transport in permeable media, using field and laboratory experiments and mathematical models. In the past this has included studies of the movement of water, nonaqueous phase liquids, dissolved chemicals, colloids, and bacteria through porous, fractured, and faulted media. He was the 1992 Darcy Lecturer for the Association of Groundwater Scientists and Engineers. He was elected a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union in 1994. He received the O.E. Meinzer Award from the Geological Society of America in 1996 and was elected Fellow of the Society in the same year. He received his B.S. degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology and his M.S., C.E., and Ph.D. degrees from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Eric F. Wood is a professor in the Department of Civil Engineering and Operations Research, Water Resources Program, at Princeton University. His areas of interest include hydroclimatology with an emphasis on land–atmosphere interaction, hydrologic impact of climate change, stochastic hydrology, hydrologic forecasting, and rainfall–runoff modeling. Dr. Wood is an associate editor for Reviews in Geophysics, Applied Mathematics and Computation: Modeling the Environment, and Journal of Forecasting. He is a member of the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, the Climate Research Committee, and the Committee on Hydrologic Science. He is a former member of the Water Science and Technology Board and BASC's GEWEX panel. Dr. Wood received an Sc.D. degree in civil engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1974.