D
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Joe H.Mize (chair) is Regents Professor Emeritus at Oklahoma State University, where he has served in several positions since 1972, including Director of the Center for Integrated Manufacturing and Head of the School of Industrial Engineering and Management. Prior to that, he served as Professor of Industrial Engineering at Arizona State University and Director of the Center for Automated Engineering and Robotics. Dr. Mize brings to the committee his broad experience with enterprise integration. His research interests include the development of a framework for integrating manufacturing enterprises; the development of a comprehensive modeling and simulation environment; enterprise modeling, design, and optimization; and analysis and design of integrated management control systems. He is the author or co-author of 7 engineering texts and co-editor of a 200-volume industrial engineering textbook series. Dr. Mize is a fellow of the Institute of Industrial Engineers, as well as a past national president. He received the Frank and Lillian Gilbreth Industrial Engineering Award in 1990. Dr. Mize is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on numerous NRC committees. He has also served as a member of the Manufacturing Studies Board and is now a member of the Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design.

John G.Bollinger is John Bascom Professor of Industrial Engineering and Dean Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, where he has been a faculty member since 1960. He served as Dean of the College of Engineering for 18 years, Chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, and Director of the Data Acquisition and Simulation Laboratory. In addition, Dr. Bollinger has been a Fulbright Fellow to Germany and England. His research interests include computer control of machines and processes, robotics, design of production machinery, analysis of dynamic systems, and technology innovation and entrepreneurship. His industrial experience includes serving as founding Chair of the Wisconsin Center for Manufacturing Productivity and as a past member of the Board of Directors of numerous companies, including The Rexnord Corporation, Cross and Trecker Corporation, Nicolet Instrument Corporation, and Unico, Inc. He currently serves as a Director of the Andrew Corporation, Kohler Company, Berbee Information Networks, and Cummins Allison Corporation. Dr. Bollinger has published over 100 journal articles, 2 textbooks, and holds 11 U.S.



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Munitions Manufacturing: A Call for Modernization D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Joe H.Mize (chair) is Regents Professor Emeritus at Oklahoma State University, where he has served in several positions since 1972, including Director of the Center for Integrated Manufacturing and Head of the School of Industrial Engineering and Management. Prior to that, he served as Professor of Industrial Engineering at Arizona State University and Director of the Center for Automated Engineering and Robotics. Dr. Mize brings to the committee his broad experience with enterprise integration. His research interests include the development of a framework for integrating manufacturing enterprises; the development of a comprehensive modeling and simulation environment; enterprise modeling, design, and optimization; and analysis and design of integrated management control systems. He is the author or co-author of 7 engineering texts and co-editor of a 200-volume industrial engineering textbook series. Dr. Mize is a fellow of the Institute of Industrial Engineers, as well as a past national president. He received the Frank and Lillian Gilbreth Industrial Engineering Award in 1990. Dr. Mize is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on numerous NRC committees. He has also served as a member of the Manufacturing Studies Board and is now a member of the Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design. John G.Bollinger is John Bascom Professor of Industrial Engineering and Dean Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, where he has been a faculty member since 1960. He served as Dean of the College of Engineering for 18 years, Chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, and Director of the Data Acquisition and Simulation Laboratory. In addition, Dr. Bollinger has been a Fulbright Fellow to Germany and England. His research interests include computer control of machines and processes, robotics, design of production machinery, analysis of dynamic systems, and technology innovation and entrepreneurship. His industrial experience includes serving as founding Chair of the Wisconsin Center for Manufacturing Productivity and as a past member of the Board of Directors of numerous companies, including The Rexnord Corporation, Cross and Trecker Corporation, Nicolet Instrument Corporation, and Unico, Inc. He currently serves as a Director of the Andrew Corporation, Kohler Company, Berbee Information Networks, and Cummins Allison Corporation. Dr. Bollinger has published over 100 journal articles, 2 textbooks, and holds 11 U.S.

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Munitions Manufacturing: A Call for Modernization patents. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a member of the Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design. In addition, he chaired the Committee on Visionary Manufacturing Challenges and has served on numerous other NRC committees. Reggie J.Caudill is Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering at the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), as well as Executive Director of the Multi-Lifecycle Engineering Research Center. He brings to the committee his extensive expertise in automation and robotics. Dr. Caudill has taught at NJIT since 1990 and was the founding director of the NJIT Center for Manufacturing Systems. Previously, he taught at the University of Alabama for 5 years, serving as Director of the Robotics and Computer Graphics Laboratory and Technical Coordinator for the Bevill Advanced Manufacturing Center. Prior to that, Dr. Caudill served as Co-Director of the Industrial Automation and Robotics Program at Princeton University, where he taught for 7 years. His primary area of research is the integration of advanced machine and computer technologies with applications in multilife-cycle processes, systems, and automation. Current research includes the development of a flexible automated system for assembly of optoelectronic devices; investigation of the performance of machine tools with contactless elements; and ultraprecision, environmentally conscious manufacturing systems. He is the author of over 75 technical publications and a member of the editorial advisory board of Product Design and Development. He was the 1981 recipient of the Ralph E.Teetor Award from the Society of Automotive Engineers. Ray E.Eberts is Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering at Purdue University, where he has taught since 1983, as well as Director of the Purdue Laboratory for Usability Studies and Director of Continuing Engineering Education. In 1990, he was an Invited Professor at Nippon Telephone and Telegraph’s User Interface Laboratories in Yokosuka, Japan. In 1991, he was Visiting Associate Professor in the Industrial and Systems Engineering Department of the University of Southern California. Dr. Eberts brings to the committee his expertise in the area of human-technology interfaces. His research interests include the development of theories based on cognitive science and human performance for the effective design of information displays, the identification of relationships between individuals’ cognitive goals and user interface designs, and the use of neural networks for online intelligent assistance and filtering information for complex environments. Applications of his research have included second-order control systems, computer-aided design, process control, computer programming, and on-line education. Dr. Eberts received the Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation in 1987. He is the author of over 90 refereed journal articles, conference proceedings, book chapters, and books, including User Interface Design, a textbook relating cognitive science to user interface design.

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Munitions Manufacturing: A Call for Modernization Mark S.Fox is Professor of Industrial Engineering at the University of Toronto, with concurrent appointments in the Department of Computer Science and the Faculty of Management Science. In addition, he is Head of the Enterprise Integration Laboratory and Director of the Graduate Program in Integrated Manufacturing. Previously, Dr. Fox was Associate Professor of Computer Science and Robotics at Carnegie Mellon University and Director of the Center for Integrated Manufacturing Systems. Dr. Fox brings to the committee his extensive experience in enterprise integration. Previous research has focused on the application of artificial intelligence to factory planning and scheduling problems; constraint reasoning as applied to job shop scheduling; and the application of artificial intelligence to simulation. His current research focuses on enterprise engineering, constrained-directed reasoning, a unified theory of scheduling, and enterprise modeling and coordination theory. Dr. Fox is cofounder and past president of Carnegie Group, Inc., a knowledge-based software company that focuses on engineering, manufacturing, telecommunications, and banking applications. While a consultant for Westinghouse Electric Corporation, he designed one of the first real-time sensor-based diagnosis systems dealing with errorful sensors. This system was recognized as one of the top 100 engineering achievements of 1986. He is a Fellow of the American Institute for Artificial Intelligence and a joint Fellow of the Canadian Institute of Advanced Research and PRECARN. Rajit Gadh is Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, as well as Director of the Complex Artifactual Design through Integration of Information Technologies Consortium and Director of the Integrated Computer-Aided Research on Virtual Engineering Design Laboratory. He brings to the committee his extensive expertise in virtual and concurrent design. His research interests include Internet media for visual collaboration, geometric algorithms for rapid product realization in Internet-based virtual environments; the creation of a multimedia environment for shape and design; geometric algorithms that allow for shape features to be determined from nonlinear solid models in support of virtual prototyping of complex-shaped part designs; and the integration of knowledge of manufacturability, die design, and part design into the web-based collaborative computer-aided design system. He is the author of numerous journal articles. Dr. Gadh is active in a number of professional organizations, including the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), the Society of Manufacturing Engineers, the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the American Society of Engineering Education. He was the 1993 recipient of the Ralph E.Teetor Award from the SAE, the 1995 recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, and the 1993 recipient of the Eastman Kodak/ASME Best Paper Award for his research on features-based design.

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Munitions Manufacturing: A Call for Modernization David Greenstein is currently Managing Director at Commerce One where he is responsible for enterprise level IT architectural solutions. He is also responsible for Supply Chain Management and Enterprise Security. Prior to Commerce One, David Greenstein was Project Manager in the Information Systems and Services Division of General Motors Corporation, where he worked for 17 years. Mr. Greenstein brings to the committee his expertise in enterprise integration in an industrial setting. His responsibilities included the development of a corporate strategic information system architecture for manufacturing at General Motors. In addition, he was a member of General Motors’ Corporate Enterprise Architecture Council, the goal of which is to develop a state-of-the-art corporatewide strategic information system architecture. Earlier responsibilities at General Motors included leading the research and development for an information system designed to improve agility and implementing corporate information and control systems. Prior to that, Mr. Greenstein worked as a research and system developer for the Academy of Sciences in the former USSR. Thom J.Hodgson is Professor of Industrial Engineering at North Carolina State University (NCSU) and Director of the Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering Institute. He has also served as Head of the Department of Industrial Engineering at NCSU, Director of the Division of Design and Manufacturing Systems of the National Science Foundation, Professor of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the University of Florida, Operations Research Analyst for the Ford Motor Company, and as an Officer in the U.S. Army Transportation Corps. His research interests include scheduling, production and inventory control, manufacturing systems, and applied and military operations research. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Industrial Engineers and a member of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences, and of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers. He is the author or co-author of four book chapters and 60 journal articles and has served as editor-in-chief of IIE Transactions, international associate editor of the Belgian Journal of Operations Research, Statistical and Computational Science, and a member of the international editorial board of the Journal of Design and Manufacturing. He served for 6 years as a member of the Army Science Board. Richard L.Kegg retired as Vice President of Technology and Manufacturing development at Milacron, Inc., where he worked for 44 years in R&D, Engineering, and Marketing, including managing the flexible manufacturing systems business. Dr. Kegg remains active in a number of professional societies including the International Institution for Production Engineering Research and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers. He has served on advisory boards for several organizations, including U.S. Air Force ManTech, the Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology, Lawrence Livermore Labs, the National Center for Manufacturing Science, and the NIST Manufacturing Labs. He has published several papers and was the recipient of the Gold Medal from the Society of Manufacturing Engineers. He has served on the NRC Unit Manufacturing Process Research Committee and the NRC Panel for Manufacturing Engineering

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Munitions Manufacturing: A Call for Modernization and is currently a member of the NRC Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design. Richard E.Neal is Executive Director of the Integrated Manufacturing Technology Initiative (IMTI), a not-for-profit organization focused on delivering solutions to the most important challenges that manufacturers face. In his more than 30 years in manufacturing R&D, he has held many positions from development engineer to R&D manager. For the past 10 years, he has focused on visionary programs that support the nation’s manufacturing infrastructure. He has served as Program Manager for the Technologies Enabling Agile Manufacturing (TEAM) program, as one of three principal investigators for the Next Generation Manufacturing (NGM) project, and as the project manager for the NGM follow-on called Integrated Manufacturing Technology Roadmapping (IMTR). IMTR delivered a set of manufacturing technology plans that have been received as the most comprehensive and broadly representative roadmaps (plans) ever produced. IMTI is the continuation of this series of national programs and is charged with the mission of facilitating the implementation of the technology roadmaps. Deborah S.Nightingale is Professor of Practice in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the Engineering Systems Division, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she has taught lean enterprise integration since 1997. She brings to the committee her extensive expertise in the use of computer technology in the integration of manufacturing enterprises. Prior to that, she was head of Strategic Planning and Business Development at AlliedSignal, where, among other things, she significantly improved enterprisewide productivity, profitability, and market share; established globalization strategies and identified new business development and growth opportunities; and developed a master plan for manufacturing operations. During her 17 plus years at AlliedSignal, she held management positions in operations, strategic planning, business operations, and engineering. In addition, she chaired the Garrett Engine Division Computer Integrated Manufacturing Committee. Prior to joining AlliedSignal, she worked at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, where she served as program manager for computer simulation modeling research, design, and development in support of advanced man-machine design concepts. She is the author of 40 publications and the recipient of a number of awards, including the Patricia Kayes Glass Award from the Air Force Systems Command and the Outstanding Manager of the Year Award from the American Society for Training and Development. She is a past President and Fellow of the Institute of Industrial Engineers and a member of the National Academy of Engineering, where she has served as Chair of the Industrial and Manufacturing Section Peer Committee. In addition, she served on the NRC Committee for Defense Manufacturing in 2010 and Beyond. Jeffrey L.Ruckman is the founder of Resultant Manufacturing Services (RMS), a technology-based firm with extensive expertise in program management, business assessment, and the optimization of manufacturing and business

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Munitions Manufacturing: A Call for Modernization processes. Mr. Ruckman’s expertise includes planning and implementing of computer integrated manufacturing systems; the design and development of high-precision, automated manufacturing equipment for both commercial and military end-users; and assessment of the economic impact of manufacturing and information automation. He has obtained certification from the Society of Manufacturing Engineers as an Enterprise Integrator. Prior to forming RMS, Mr. Ruckman was a Senior Consulting Associate with Coopers & Lybrand and managed a variety of successful modernization projects at small and medium manufacturers in upstate New York. In previous positions at Battelle Columbus Laboratories and at Gelzer Systems, Inc., he led state-of-the-art equipment and information systems development projects involving vision-system-assisted robotic electronics assembly and computer-numerical-control-based aerospace component repair systems. He is a member of the following organizations: Society of Manufacturing Engineers, American Society for Quality Control, Optical Society of America, and American Precision Optics Manufacturers Association. He has also authored several technical reports. Paul K.Wright is the A.Martin Berlin Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of California at Berkeley, as well as Co-Chair of the Management of Technology Program, and Associate Dean for Distance Learning and Instructional Technology. He provides the committee with extensive expertise in robotics. Prior to joining the University of California faculty in 1991, he spent 5 years at New York University as Professor of Computer Science and Director of the Robotics and Manufacturing Research Laboratory. Before that, he spent 8 years as Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the Robotics Institute of Carnegie Mellon University. His research interests include machining and robotic applications in flexible manufacturing systems, the development of expert systems for manufacturing, and rapid prototyping. Dr. Wright received the Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer Award from the Society of Manufacturing Engineers in 1980, the Ralph J.Teetor Award from the Society of Automotive Engineers in 1981, and the Blackall Award from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1985. He is the author of numerous articles, book chapters, and books and holds a U.S. patent with an additional patent pending. Dr. Wright has served on the NRC Committee to Study Information Technology and Manufacturing and the NRC Committee on Rapid Prototyping Facilities in the U.S. Manufacturing Community, and he is a former member of the Manufacturing Studies Board (now the Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design).