shop in December 2001 to further the community-building process and to begin roadmapping the issue. The final activity of the committee will be a major symposium in fall 2002; this symposium will bring the community together again for the purpose of building a standing body of experts to monitor learning with information technology and to plan future activities as appropriate. In addition to the reports to be produced, another committee product will be an interactive website to promote the growth of the community.

This report summarizes the proceedings of the symposium and is intended for people interested in considering better strategies for using information technology in the educational arena. While it offers insights from the presenters on both the challenges to and the opportunities for forging a better dialogue among learning scientists, technologists, and educators, it does not contain conclusions or recommendations. Rather, it highlights issues to consider, constituents to engage, and strategies to employ in the effort to build a coalition to harness the power of information technologies for the improvement of American education. Every effort has been made to convey the speakers' content and viewpoints accurately. Recognizing the speculative nature of many of the speaker contributions, most attributions identify a speaker by area of expertise rather than by name. The report reflects the proceedings of the workshop and is not intended to be a comprehensive review of all the issues involved in the project to improve learning with information technology.



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