Bransford, A.L. Brown, and R.R. Cocking, (Eds.). Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

National Science Board. (1998). Science and Engineering Indicators, Arlington, VA: National Science Board.

National Science Foundation. (1997). Shaping the Future. Arlington, VA: National Science Foundation.

National Science Teachers Association. (1998). Standards for Science Teacher Preparation, in collaboration with the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science. Arlington, VA: National Science Teachers Association. Available at http://www.nsta.org/main/pdfs/nsta98standards.pdf [4/23/02].

Ricci R. et al. (1998) Inquiry-Based Laboratory Experiments, Dubuque, IA: McGraw-Hill Pub.



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Learning and Understanding: Improving Advanced Study of Mathematics and Science in U.S. High Schools - Report of the Content Panel for Chemistry Bransford, A.L. Brown, and R.R. Cocking, (Eds.). Washington, DC: National Academy Press. National Science Board. (1998). Science and Engineering Indicators, Arlington, VA: National Science Board. National Science Foundation. (1997). Shaping the Future. Arlington, VA: National Science Foundation. National Science Teachers Association. (1998). Standards for Science Teacher Preparation, in collaboration with the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science. Arlington, VA: National Science Teachers Association. Available at http://www.nsta.org/main/pdfs/nsta98standards.pdf [4/23/02]. Ricci R. et al. (1998) Inquiry-Based Laboratory Experiments, Dubuque, IA: McGraw-Hill Pub.

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Learning and Understanding: Improving Advanced Study of Mathematics and Science in U.S. High Schools - Report of the Content Panel for Chemistry Appendix A Biographical Sketches of the Chemistry Panel Members Dr. Conrad Leon Stanitski (liaison) is a Professor of Chemistry and Chair of the Chemistry Department at the University of Central Arkansas. His principal focus is on inorganic chemistry and on general chemistry for science and nonscience majors. He currently serves as the Chair-Elect of the American Chemical Society’s (ACS) Division of Chemical Education and the ACS Committee on Education, has directed numerous ACS teacher training institutes, is an ongoing National Science Foundation (NSF) proposal reviewer, and has been an invited speaker at numerous international institutions. Dr. Stanitski has published many highly regarded textbooks in the field, including Chemistry in Context: Applying Chemistry to Society, The Chemical World, Chemistry in the Community, Chemical Principles with Qualitative Analysis, and Chemistry for Health-Related Sciences: Concepts and Correlations. Dr. Stanitski received his B.S. from Bloomsburg State College in Science Education, his M.A. from the University of Northern Iowa in Science Education, and his Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut in Inorganic Chemistry. Dr. Arthur B. Ellis is Meloche-Bascom Professor of Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin at Madison and a Team Leader of the NSF-funded National Institute for Science Education. In addition to receiving numerous teaching awards, Dr. Ellis is currently involved in the creation of innovative instructional materials that integrate materials science into the chemistry curriculum. His research on the electro-optical properties of semiconductor interfaces has led to the development of new classes of online chemical sensors. He is currently serving a 2-year appointment to the National Research Council’s (NRC) Committee on Undergraduate Science Education. Dr. Ellis received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Inorganic Chemistry. Dr. Patricia A. Metz is an Associate Professor and Co-coordinator of General Chemistry at the University of Georgia. She specializes in the teaching and learning of chemistry and conducts research on curriculum development, instructional design, conceptual understanding, and assessment. She is responsible for the development of original guided-inquiry biochemistry and general chemistry laboratory classes for both chemistry and nonchemistry majors. Dr. Metz has published several articles related to instructional methods and diagnostic techniques. She received her Ph.D. from Purdue University in Chemistry Education. Mr. John C. Oliver is a science teacher and department chair at Lindbergh High School in Saint Louis, Missouri, where he has taught a range of biology and chemistry classes, including both AP and IB Chemistry. His teaching efforts have been recognized by such awards as the

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Learning and Understanding: Improving Advanced Study of Mathematics and Science in U.S. High Schools - Report of the Content Panel for Chemistry Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship and local and regional high school teaching awards from ACS. Mr. Oliver actively pursues a variety of enrichment coursework in such fields as physics, chemistry, laboratory techniques, and chemistry education and is a member of numerous professional organizations. He received his M.A.T. in science education from Webster College in Saint Louis and an A.B. in Zoology from the University of Missouri at Columbia, with a minor in Chemistry. Mr. David Pysnik is a chemistry instructor at Sidney Central Schools in Sydney, New York. He teaches the New York Board of Regents Chemistry, which is similar in content to the AP program, but he does not teach AP Chemistry. Mr. Pysnik focuses on teaching through a research-based approach and has worked as a research associate at Ithaca college for the last 20 summers. He has developed mobile laboratory programs and has won the Catalyst Award from the Chemical Manufacturers Association, the Tandy Technology Scholars Award, the ACS Northeast Regional Award in High School Chemistry Teaching, and the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Teaching. Mr. Pysnik received his B.S. from Juniata College and his M.S. from Indiana University. Dr. A. Truman Schwartz is DeWitt Wallace Professor of Chemistry at Macalester College, where he previously served as Chair of the Chemistry Department and Dean of Faculty. His research interests include chemical education; physical chemistry of proteins, other biological macromolecules, and biological membranes; and calorimetry. Professor Schwartz has been honored with numerous teaching awards in chemistry at the college, state, and national levels. He is a member of ACS and the National Science Teachers Association, and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received an M.A. at Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Glenda M. Torrence is a Science Resource Teacher at Montgomery Blair High School in Maryland, where she is actively involved with curriculum development for new and preexisting courses, interdisciplinary cooperation with the mathematics and technology departments, and the implementation of assessment methodologies for the chemistry department. She has taught chemistry courses at the University of Maryland at College Park and was nominated for the Presidential Teaching Award. Dr. Torrence received her Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from the State University of New York at Buffalo.