Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers

Daniel E. Arvizu is senior vice president and technology fellow in the CH2M HILL Energy, Environment, and Systems Business Group. Prior to joining CH2M HILL, Dr. Arvizu worked for 21 years at Sandia National Laboratories, where he managed leading-edge research in areas ranging from solar energy to nuclear weapons. He also led the development of industry/laboratory partnerships for technology commercialization and has been actively involved in supporting university programs to prepare future scientists and engineers for the workforce. Dr. Arvizu presently serves on the U.S. Department of Energy National Coal Council and U.S. Department of Defense Army Science Board; he is an advisor to the National Research Council Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences. In 1996, he was awarded the Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Award for Executive Excellence. He received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from New Mexico State University and an M.S. and Ph.D., also in mechanical engineering, from Stanford University.

Sandra Begay-Campbell, a Navajo, is a senior member of the technical staff at Sandia National Laboratories and board chair and executive director emerita of the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES). Prior to working at Sandia, Ms. Begay-Campbell worked at Los Alamos National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. She received an M.S. in structural engineering from Stanford University and a B.S. from the University of New Mexico.

Richard P. Cowie was elected vice president of employee relations (now called human resources) for Consolidated Edison in March 1994. He joined the company



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Diversity in Engineering: Managing the Workforce of the Future Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers Daniel E. Arvizu is senior vice president and technology fellow in the CH2M HILL Energy, Environment, and Systems Business Group. Prior to joining CH2M HILL, Dr. Arvizu worked for 21 years at Sandia National Laboratories, where he managed leading-edge research in areas ranging from solar energy to nuclear weapons. He also led the development of industry/laboratory partnerships for technology commercialization and has been actively involved in supporting university programs to prepare future scientists and engineers for the workforce. Dr. Arvizu presently serves on the U.S. Department of Energy National Coal Council and U.S. Department of Defense Army Science Board; he is an advisor to the National Research Council Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences. In 1996, he was awarded the Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Award for Executive Excellence. He received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from New Mexico State University and an M.S. and Ph.D., also in mechanical engineering, from Stanford University. Sandra Begay-Campbell, a Navajo, is a senior member of the technical staff at Sandia National Laboratories and board chair and executive director emerita of the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES). Prior to working at Sandia, Ms. Begay-Campbell worked at Los Alamos National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. She received an M.S. in structural engineering from Stanford University and a B.S. from the University of New Mexico. Richard P. Cowie was elected vice president of employee relations (now called human resources) for Consolidated Edison in March 1994. He joined the company

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Diversity in Engineering: Managing the Workforce of the Future in 1963 and has held positions of increasing responsibility. From 1980 to 1986 as general manager of Manhattan customer service, he led the company’s efforts to decentralize into geographic branches. He was named director of credit and collections in 1986 and assistant to the executive vice president of division operations from 1988 to 1990. In 1991, he was named director of customer service. He is also a member of the Board of Trustees of the American Red Cross of Greater New York and the Board of Directors of the Fourteenth Street-Union Square Local Development Corporation. Mr. Cowie earned a B.S. in economics from the College of Staten Island and an M.B.A. from Columbia University. Nicholas Donofrio leads the strategy for developing and commercializing advanced technology for IBM’s global operations. His responsibilities include overseeing IBM research, the Global Integrated Supply Chain Team, the Integrated Product Development Team, and the Import Compliance Office. He also leads IBM’s worldwide quality initiatives. He is chairman of IBM’s Corporate Technology Council, chairman of the Board of Governors for the IBM Academy of Technology, a member of IBM’s Corporate Development Committee, and a member of the IBM Chairman’s Council. Mr. Donofrio spent the early part of his career in microprocessor development as a designer of logic and memory chips. Mr. Donofrio is a strong advocate of education, particularly in mathematics and science, the keys to economic competitiveness. His focus is on advancing educational, employment, and career opportunities for underrepresented minorities and women. He is a member of the Board of Directors for the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Mr. Donofrio earned a B.S. in electrical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and an M.S., also in electrical engineering, from Syracuse University. In 1999 he was awarded an honorary doctorate in engineering from Polytechnic University. Janet M. Graham joined E.I. du Pont de Nemours in 1989, where she is a training and development specialist in the People and Organizational Development Group, Corporate Human Resources. Ms. Graham is a consultant in the company and to other organizations on mentoring and has helped several businesses establish mentoring programs specific to their business needs. Her clients include American Airlines, Bell Canada, Conoco, Greenwood Trust, and Michelin. Ms. Graham is a member of the Mentoring Institute, the International Mentoring Association and the DuPont Mentoring Excellence Committee. In 1998, she was cocoordinator of the DuPont Mentoring Conference. She is a frequent speaker at conferences on mentoring. Orlando A. Gutierrez is a national past president of the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers. He retired in 1992 after 31 years with the National

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Diversity in Engineering: Managing the Workforce of the Future Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) where he was an aerospace research engineer for 21 years. He has published more than 25 papers on space power-generation systems and jet-noise suppression. In addition, he served for eight years as manager of NASA’s Hispanic Employment Program and two years as manager of the Minority University Program. Mr. Gutierrez has been recognized by many organizations for his educational, recruitment, and community activities. He is the recipient of the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers Jaime Oaxaca Award; the Equal Opportunity Medal and the Exceptional Service Medal, both from NASA; and the Medalla de Oro from the Society of Mexican American Engineers and Scientists. Sarah Ann Kerr, who began her career at E.I. du Pont de Nemours in 1995, is an investment engineer responsible for estimating and controlling costs for capital investments. Since 1999, she has been instrumental in the development of a mentoring program for the DuPont engineering organization. She coordinated the design and implementation of a training workshop and has been active in all phases of the mentoring program. Ms. Kerr has made numerous presentations on mentoring to DuPont organizations and external groups. Michele Lezama, who was an active volunteer leader for 12 years, is now the executive director of the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE). She oversees the operations of the NSBE World Headquarters staff and is chief operating officer of this student-run organization of 15,000 college students, technical professionals, and precollege students. Ms. Lezama also has experience at HBO, where she was director of scrambling operations; CBS Television, where she was associate director of broadcast operations; and IBM, Raytheon, and Texas Instruments, where she held engineering positions. At IBM, she volunteered to serve as the director of an employee outreach program called PREMISE (Poughkeepsie Regional Effort for Minority Introduction to Science and Engineering). Ms. Lezama has a B.S. in industrial engineering from Northeastern University and an M.S. in industrial engineering and an M.B.A. in finance and accounting, both from Columbia University. She is a member of Tau Beta Pi, Alpha Pi Mu, a GEM Fellow, and a Robert Toigo Fellow. Mary C. Mattis is a senior research fellow at Catalyst, a nonprofit organization that works with corporations and professional firms to retain and advance women. Dr. Mattis conceptualizes and implements Catalyst’s research on women’s leadership development and is a frequently requested speaker on this topic. For 10 years, she led the Catalyst team that evaluates corporate gender diversity initiatives for the Catalyst Award. She is the author of the Catalyst publications, Women in Engineering and Women Scientists in Industry, as well as numerous other Catalyst research reports. She is regarded as an international expert on corporate best practices for retaining and advancing women and has published

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Diversity in Engineering: Managing the Workforce of the Future extensively on this subject. In 1999, she spent a month in Australia and New Zealand conducting workshops and speaking to business and government groups on gender diversity best practices. Dr. Mattis earned her Ph.D. in sociology from Washington University. Lisa Nungesser is senior vice president, Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglass and vice president, Parsons Brinckerhoff Aviation, Inc. Her work has focused on applied research, management, and community involvement, and she has directed numerous multidisciplinary studies, including demographic and transportation studies, economic feasibility studies, and facility siting studies through environmental impact assessments and statements. Her experience and training include both legal and technical aspects of environmental management. She is Parsons Brinckerhoff’s area expert on environmental justice and community impact, and has extensive experience in the National Environmental Policy Act process, including a technical background in socioeconomics, demographics, and citizen participation in infrastructure projects. Prior to joining Parsons Brinckerhoff, Dr. Nungesser was president and founding principal of a planning and research consulting firm where she focused primarily on community involvement and location theory. Earlier, as a transportation researcher for the Texas Transportation Institute of Texas A&M University, Dr. Nungesser conducted several socioeconomic forecasting studies in the lower Rio Grande Valley and highway corridor studies for San Antonio and McAllen, Texas. She has a Ph.D. in community/regional planning and geography from the University of Texas at Austin. James J. Padilla, group vice president, Ford North America, is responsible for all operations, including manufacturing, product development, marketing, and sales of Ford cars and trucks in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. Mr. Padilla joined Ford in 1966 as a quality control engineer. In 1976, he was promoted to a series of management positions in product engineering and manufacturing. These included program operations manager for several car lines and director, Small Car Segment, Car Product Development. From 1992 to 1994, Mr. Padilla was director of engineering and manufacturing, Jaguar Cars, Ltd., during a critical turnaround period. He subsequently oversaw the successful launches of the Jaguar XJ series, the Jaguar XK-8, and the world-class AJ26 engine, the Aston-Martin DB-7, and the Lincoln LS. He earned a B.S. and M.S. in chemical engineering and an M.A. in economics from the University of Detroit. Mr. Padilla is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and was named Engineer of the Year by the Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Awards Conference. Willie Pearson, Jr., is chair of the School of History, Technology and Society, Ivan Allen College, Georgia Institute of Technology. A specialist in the sociology

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Diversity in Engineering: Managing the Workforce of the Future of science and sociology of the family, Dr. Pearson is the author or coeditor of six books and monographs and numerous articles and chapters. His newest book in progress is Beyond Small Numbers: Voices of African-American Ph.D. Chemists (JAI Press, 2002). He has held research grants from the National Science Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, Sloan Foundation, and U.S. Department of Justice and postdoctoral fellowships at the Educational Testing Service and the Office of Technology Assessment. He is a lecturer in Sigma Xi’s Distinguished Lectureship Program and chair of the Committee on Science, Engineering and Public Policy, American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Pearson received his Ph.D. in sociology from Southern Illinois University (SIU) and the Alumni Achievement Award from SIU in 1993. He completed his undergraduate education at Wiley College. Tyrone D. Taborn, chairman and CEO of Career Communications Group, Inc. (CCG), is the publisher and editor in chief of US Black Engineer & Information Technology, the only general-interest technology magazine for the African-American community. Mr. Taborn is also the producer of the award-winning syndicated TV show, “Success Through Education,” and publisher of Hispanic Engineer & Information Technology. Mr. Taborn has been a guest editorial writer for the Baltimore Sun and writes a technology column that appears in newspapers, magazines, and on Web sites. He is currently a member of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and the Baltimore Engineering Society and has served on the boards of directors of the Afro-American Newspaper Company, the Baltimore Urban League, and the Granville Academy. Mr. Taborn is the founder of the Black Family Technology Week Program, which is sponsored by IBM Corporation, Microsoft, and Sun Microsystems. He was recently selected as an Internet and Technology Leader by Sprint and MOBE IT, which recognizes minority leaders. He was named one of the 50 Most Important African-Americans in Technology by the editors of Blackmoney.com and souloftechnology.net. An Afro-Latino who grew up in Los Angeles, Mr. Taborn attended Cornell University, where he majored in government. He was also a member of Quill and Dagger and the Telluride Association. Iwona Turlik received her M.S. in electrical engineering and her Ph.D. in technical science from the Technical University of Wroclaw, Poland, where she started her professional career as a tenured faculty member. She has worked as manager of exploratory processing with Bell Northern Research, where she was involved in process and device development for several Si and III-V technologies. Dr. Turlik was director of advanced packaging technology programs, Microelectronics Center of North Carolina, and a tenured professor in the Electrical Engineering Department, University of North Carolina, Charlotte. She joined Motorola in 1994 as vice president and director of the Corporate Manufacturing Research Center and is currently corporate vice president and director of Motorola

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Diversity in Engineering: Managing the Workforce of the Future Advanced Technology Center and corporate vice president and director of Motorola Technology Acquisition Office. She has published more than 100 professional papers and presentations, edited two books, and holds 13 patents. Dr. Turlik was named one of the 50 Most Influential People in the PCB industry by PC FAB and ATOMIC29. She is also a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and a recipient of the 1994 Board of Governors Distinguished Service Award for outstanding contributions to the IEEE Components, Packaging, and Manufacturing Society. Thomas S. Williamson, Jr. a partner at Covington & Burling in Washington, D.C., focuses on litigation and employment-related law. From 1993 to 1996 he was the solicitor of labor, the chief legal officer for the U.S. Department of Labor, where he oversaw a staff of 700, including 500 lawyers located in Washington, D.C., and in 15 regional and subregional offices. The Office of Solicitor is responsible for enforcing approximately 180 federal statutes related to wage protections, worker health and safety, pension benefits, employment discrimination and affirmative action, labor standards, job training, union democracy, unemployment insurance, and various other employee benefit programs. He represented the Labor Department as a member of the Board of Directors of the Overseas Private Investment Corporation and as a delegate to the International Labor Organization. He also participated in the interagency working group that negotiated the labor-related part of the North American Free Trade Agreement. Mr. Williamson earned his B.A. in social studies from Harvard University and his L.L.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. Shelley A.M. Wolff is national president of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) and associate vice president of HNTB Corporation, where she manages the highway design department in the Kansas City office; she is also director of corporate project management training programs and operations officer for HNTB’s Corporate Business Services. Ms. Wolff leads SWE’s outreach, education, and professional development programs. In 2002, SWE will focus on enhancing the image of engineers, one of the main recommendations of the report by the Commission on the Advancement of Women and Minorities in Science, Engineering and Technology. Ms. Wolff earned her B.S. in civil engineering from Iowa State University and her M.S. in engineering management from University of Kansas. She is a licensed professional engineer in Kansas, Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, and Arkansas. Wm. A. Wulf is president of the National Academy of Engineering and vice chair of the National Research Council, the principal operating arm of the National Academies. He is on leave from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, where he is AT&T Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Among his activities at the university are a complete revision of the undergraduate computer science

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Diversity in Engineering: Managing the Workforce of the Future curriculum, research on computer architecture and computer security, and a project to enable humanities scholars to exploit information technology. Dr. Wulf has had a distinguished professional career that includes serving as assistant director of the National Science Foundation; chair and chief executive officer of Tartan Laboratories Inc., Pittsburgh; and professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon University. He is the author of more than 80 papers and technical reports, has written three books, and holds two U.S. patents.