TABLE 2.8 Death Rates for Selected Causes by Geographic Region (1999)

Region

Infant Mortality

Motor Vehicle (ages 15–19)

Suicide (ages 15–19)

Homicide (ages 15–19)

Northeast

13.6

19.0

5.9

8.0

South

32.8

33.3

8.5

11.8

Midwest

30.8

26.3

8.7

10.7

West

23.5

30.0

8.8

11.0

NOTE: Infant mortality rate is per 1,000 live births. Other death rates are per 100,000 children aged 15 to 19. Homicide deaths include deaths from homicides and legal interventions.

Regions: Northeast (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont); South (Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia); Midwest (Illinois,Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin); and West (Alaska,Arizona,California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho,Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming).

SOURCE: NCHS, 2001e.

rates at 0.6 and 0.75 per 100,000, respectively7 (NCHS, 2001e). For homicide rates across all age groups, factors contributing to variations appear to include level of urbanization and socioeconomic conditions (see, e.g., Cubbin et al., 2000).

On a regional basis (Table 2.8), the South led the nation in infant mortality, homicides, and motor vehicle-related mortality rates for ages 15 to 19. The West Coast led in suicide rates for this age group. The Northeast region had the lowest death rates for all categories reported here.

Gender Differences

Across all age ranges and for most causes of death, boys have a higher death rate than girls. The disparity increases with age and ranges from a 20 percent higher death rate for male children less than 5 to a 130 percent greater death rate for older adolescent boys compared to girls (NCHS, 2001a).

Male gender is a major risk factor for all injury-related deaths (NPTR, 2001; Hussey, 1997). The most dramatic gender difference is seen in the homicide rate for older adolescents. Boys are more than five times as likely

7  

Rates are based on fewer than 20 deaths throughout the year.



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