TABLE 2.1 Estimated Funding for Nanotechnology from FY 1999 to FY 2003 (million dollars)

Organizationa

FY 1999

FY 2000

FY 2001

FY 2002 Estimate

FY 2003 Request

NSF

85

97

150

199

221

DOD

70

70

123

180

201

DOE

58

58

88

91

139

DOJ

 

 

1

1.4

1.4

DOT

 

 

 

2

2

NIHb

21

32

40

41

43

NASA

5

5

22

46

51

NISTc

16

8

33

38

44

EPA

 

 

5

5

5

USDA

 

 

2

1.5

2.5

Total

255

270

464

604.9

709.9

aFunding figures for four additional entities (the Departments of State and Treasury, the CIA, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission) that are also joining the NNI are not yet available.

bIn the Department of Health and Human Services.

cIn the Department of Commerce.

NSET in multiagency planning and the preparation of budgets and program assessment documents. It also assists NSET with the collection and dissemination of information on industry, state, and international nanoscale science and technology research, development, and commercialization activities. Currently represented on NSET are the Departments of Defense (DOD), Energy (DOE), Justice (DOJ), Transportation (DOT), Agriculture (USDA), State, and Treasury; the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA); the National Institutes of Health (NIH); the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); the National Science Foundation (NSF); the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC); the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA); and two White House offices (the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and OSTP).

According to the NNI implementation plan,5 each agency invests in projects that support its own mission and retains control over how it will allocate resources against its NNI proposals based on the availability of funding. Each agency evaluates its own research activities within the NNI according to its own Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) procedures. NNI coordination should result from NSET activities, direct interactions among program officers from the participating agencies, periodic management meetings and program reviews, and joint scientific and engineering workshops. OSTP works with the NSET and with individual agencies to establish NNI priorities, budgets, and metrics for evaluating various research activities.

STATUS OF FUNDING

The NNI has received strong Presidential and congressional support. Table 2.1 presents funding for nanoscale science and technology from 1999 to the present. For the purposes of determining which programs are to be included in the tally of federal “nanotechnology” funding, the OMB has developed a definition of nanotechnology to guide federal agencies in the reporting of their respective research efforts.6 While

5  

NNI: Leading to the Next Industrial Revolution. The Initiative and Its Implementation Plan, NSTC, July 2000, pp. 38-40.

6  

Contained in Circular A-11, 1465-xx, NNI research activities are defined as follows:

… research and technology development at the atomic, molecular, or macromolecular levels, in the length scale of approximately 1-100 nanometer range, to provide a fundamental understanding of phenomena and materials properties at the nanoscale and to model, create, characterize, manipulate, and use structures, devices, and systems that have novel properties and functions because of their small or intermediate size. The novel and differentiating properties and function are developed at a critical length scale of matter typically under 100 nanometers. Nanotechnology research and development includes integration of nanoscale structure into larger material components, systems, and architectures. Within these larger scale assemblies, the control and construction of their structures and components devices remain at the nanometer scale.



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