lem of inconsistencies in definition and measurement that have thus far characterized research on elder mistreatment. Chapter 3 sketches a theoretical framework that may be useful in organizing research on the phenomenology and etiology of elder mistreatment in different settings and contexts. Chapter 4 addresses the challenge of measuring the occurrence of elder mistreatment in the population, highlighting important epidemiological considerations in elder mistreatment research. Chapter 5 summarizes what is now known about risk factors for elder mistreatment and identifies priorities for future research. Chapter 6 addresses research needed to improve screening and case identification in clinical settings. Chapter 7 reviews policies and programs aiming to prevent or respond to elder mistreatment and identifies priorities for future research. Chapter 8 addresses concerns about protecting human subjects in elder mistreatment research, and Chapter 9 identifies some necessary conditions for moving the field forward. The panel’s conclusions and recommendations are presented in Table 1-1.



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