though it is not clear how it might be achieved.71 The success of the nation’s R&D enterprise in information technology (as well as in other fields) rests in no small part on the ability of researchers to learn from each other in a relatively free and open intellectual environment. Constraining the openness of that environment (e.g., by requiring that research be classified or forbidding certain research from being undertaken) would have obvious negative consequences for researchers and the creation of new knowledge. On the other hand, keeping a counterterrorist agenda in mind, the free and open dissemination of information has potential costs as well, because terrorists may obtain information that they can use against us. Historically, these competing interests have been balanced—with more of one in exchange for less of the other. But the committee believes (or at least hopes) that there are other ways of reconciling the undeniable tension, and calls for some thought to be given to a solution to this dilemma that does not demand such a trade-off. If such a solution can be found, it should be a design characteristic of the R&D infrastructure.

Finally, successfully addressing the privacy and confidentiality issues that arise in counterterrorism efforts will be critical for the deployment of many information technologies. These issues are serious enough to merit their own research efforts, though not at the scale and intensity that the other areas might warrant.

REFERENCES

Brooks, Frederick P. 1975. The Mythical Man-Month. Addison-Wesley, Boston, Mass.


Christen, Hank, et al. 2001. “An Overview of Incident Management,” Perspectives on Preparedness, No. 4, September. Available online at <http:ksgnotes1.harvard.edu/BCSIA/Library.nsf/pubs/POP4>.

Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, National Research Council. 1990. Computers at Risk: Safe Computing in the Information Age, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.

Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, National Research Council. 1996. Computing and Communications in the Extreme: Research for Crisis Management and Other Applications, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.

Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, National Research Council. 1997. The Evolution of Untethered Communications, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.

Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, National Research Council. 1999a. Information Technology Research for Crisis Management, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.

Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, National Research Council. 1999b. Trust in Cyberspace, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.

Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, National Research Council. 1999c. Realizing the Potential of C4I: Fundamental Challenges, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.

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A Computer Science and Telecommunications Board study in progress on improving cybersecurity research in the United States will address this question.



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