• Traditional market mechanisms for the development of new vaccines are failing to provide products for responding to bioterrorism. The Department of Health and Human Services should explore new mechanisms to facilitate the development and production of such vaccines. A national orphan vaccine center, perhaps created as a government-owned, contractor-operated facility, might be necessary to bring potential vaccines to the stage at which they can be licensed. Such a center could help coordinate extramural research and development activities among public and private institutions, perform its own research in critical areas, and coordinate and oversee the clinical trials and animal model work on which licensing would be based. A production facility for orphan vaccines would also be needed. (See Chapter 3.)

  • Information security is identified in this study, as it was by the President’s Commission on Critical Infrastructure, as a major element in the nation’s vulnerabilities, but no agency or department has the primary mission to foster progress in this field. DARPA and NSF created much of the science base for the Internet and for computer science in general, and other agencies—DOE, DOD, FBI, and NASA in particular—have made important contributions to computer-network technology. But the security of commercial computers is left largely to the private sector, and the present weakness in this area is a consequence of minimal market demand for it in the past. Coordination of agency efforts in this area is important, as is building a federal infrastructure to tap the intellectual and fiscal resources of private industry. (See Chapter 5.)

REFERENCES

Advisory Panel to Assess Domestic Response Capabilities for Terrorism Involving Weapons of Mass Destruction (Gilmore Commission). 2000. Second Annual Report to the President and the Congress, December 15.

Advisory Panel to Assess Domestic Response Capabilities for Terrorism Involving Weapons of Mass Destruction (Gilmore Commission). 2001. Third Annual Report to the President and the Congress, December 15.


Carter, Ashton B. 2001-02. “The Architecture of Government in the Face of Terrorism,” International Security, Vol. 26, No. 2, Winter, pp. 5-23.

Commission to Assess the Organization of the Federal Government to Combat the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction (Deutch Commission). 1999. Combating Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction, July 14.

Commission on the Roles and Capabilities of the United States Intelligence Community (Brown Commission). 1996. Preparing for the 21st Century—An Appraisal of U.S. Intelligence, March.


General Accounting Office. 2001. Combating Terrorism: Selected Challenges and Related Recommendations, GAO-01-82. September.


Homeland Security Council. 2001. Homeland Security Presidential Directive–1, Subject: Organization and Operation of the Homeland Security Council, October 29.


Joint Task Force on Intelligence and Law Enforcement (Richards/Rindskopf Report). 1995. Report to the Attorney General and Director of Central Intelligence, May.



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