Appendix A
Workshop Agenda

Defining Science-based Concerns Associated with Products of Animal Biotechnology: A Public Workshop

NRC Committee on Defining Science-based Concerns Associated with Products of Animal Biotechnology

The National Academies

Green Building, Room 104

2001 Wisconsin Ave, NW

Washington, DC 20007



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OCR for page 158
Animal Biotechnology: Science-Based Concerns Appendix A Workshop Agenda Defining Science-based Concerns Associated with Products of Animal Biotechnology: A Public Workshop NRC Committee on Defining Science-based Concerns Associated with Products of Animal Biotechnology The National Academies Green Building, Room 104 2001 Wisconsin Ave, NW Washington, DC 20007

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Animal Biotechnology: Science-Based Concerns November 27, 2001 Agenda OPEN SESSION 8:00–8:15 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks John G. Vandenbergh and Kim Waddell 8:15–8:35 a.m. How We Make “Them” and Where We’re Headed Robert J. Wall, USDA/ARS 8:35–9:15 a.m. Current Applications of Somatic Cell Cloning José B. Cibelli, Advanced Cell Technology, Inc. 9:15–9:35 a.m. The Use of Transposons in Animal Biotechnology Perry B. Hackett, Discovery Genomics/University of Minnesota 9:35–10:00 a.m. Discussion 10:00–10:15 a.m. Break 10:15–10:35 a.m. Food Animal Productivity and Welfare Paul B. Thompson, Purdue University 10:35–10:55 a.m Defining Animal Biotechnology Policy: How Far Will Science and Regulation Be Able to Take Us? Jean Fruci, Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology

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Animal Biotechnology: Science-Based Concerns 10:55–11:15 a.m. A Framework for Identifying Hazards and Risks Associated with Transgenic Animals Larisa Rudenko, Integrative Biostrategies, L.L.C. 11:15 a.m.–12:00 p.m. Discussion 12:00–1:00 p.m. Lunch/Break 1:00–1:40 p.m. Cloning of Farm Animals: A Four-year Analysis Michael D. Bishop, Infigen, Inc. 1:40–2:00 p.m. European Perspectives on Animal Cloning and Biotechnology Keith H. S. Campbell, University of Nottingham 2:00–2:20 p.m. Food Allergenicity and Biotechnology Samuel B. Lehrer, Tulane University 2:20–2:45 p.m. Discussion 2:45–3:15 p.m. Transgenic Insects: Potential Risk Assessment Issues Marjorie A. Hoy, University of Florida 3:15–3:45 p.m. Consumer Perspectives on Animal Biotechnology Michael K. Hansen, Consumer Policy Institute 3:45–4:00 p.m. Break 4:00–5:00 p.m. Discussion 5:00 p.m. Adjourn