About the Authors

JOHN G. VANDENBERGH, Chair, is Professor of Zoology at North Carolina State University, where he began teaching and managing a research program in behavioral endocrinology in 1990. He has published extensively on the behavior, genetics, and physiology of small mammals. His previous National Academies committee service includes the Committee on Understanding the Biology of Sex and Gender Differences, the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research (ILAR) committees on Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, Cost of and Payment for Animal Research, and the Revised Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. He earned his Ph.D. in zoology from Pennsylvania State University.

ALWYNELLE (NELL) SELF AHL is USDA Fellow to the Center for the Integrated Study of Food, Animal, and Plant Systems at Tuskegee University. Dr. Ahl’s interests include risk assessment for foodborne microbial pathogens, environmental epidemiology, the evolutionary biology of mammals, and the intersection of animals and humans in relation to public health. She received her Ph.D. in zoology and biochemistry from the University of Wyoming in 1967, and her D.V.M. from Michigan State University in 1987.

JOHN M. COFFIN is the American Cancer Society Research Professor of Molecular Biology and Microbiology at the Tufts University School of Medicine. He also is the Director of the HIV Drug Resistance Program at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, Maryland. Coffin is recognized for his



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Animal Biotechnology: Science-Based Concerns About the Authors JOHN G. VANDENBERGH, Chair, is Professor of Zoology at North Carolina State University, where he began teaching and managing a research program in behavioral endocrinology in 1990. He has published extensively on the behavior, genetics, and physiology of small mammals. His previous National Academies committee service includes the Committee on Understanding the Biology of Sex and Gender Differences, the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research (ILAR) committees on Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, Cost of and Payment for Animal Research, and the Revised Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. He earned his Ph.D. in zoology from Pennsylvania State University. ALWYNELLE (NELL) SELF AHL is USDA Fellow to the Center for the Integrated Study of Food, Animal, and Plant Systems at Tuskegee University. Dr. Ahl’s interests include risk assessment for foodborne microbial pathogens, environmental epidemiology, the evolutionary biology of mammals, and the intersection of animals and humans in relation to public health. She received her Ph.D. in zoology and biochemistry from the University of Wyoming in 1967, and her D.V.M. from Michigan State University in 1987. JOHN M. COFFIN is the American Cancer Society Research Professor of Molecular Biology and Microbiology at the Tufts University School of Medicine. He also is the Director of the HIV Drug Resistance Program at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, Maryland. Coffin is recognized for his

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Animal Biotechnology: Science-Based Concerns pioneering work in the use of genomic analysis to understand the biology of retroviruses, elucidating their genetic organization, mechanism of replication, recombination, and transduction. His areas of expertise include viruses, viral vectors, and transduction and their role in animal biotechnology. WILLARD H. EYESTONE is a research associate professor in the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences at the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine. He conducts basic and applied research in animal reproduction, with emphasis on embryo biotechnology. Eyestone was one of the original team members that produced the first transgenic cow as well as the first calves from in vitro-produced embryos. Dr. Eyestone received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin in animal science. ERIC M. HALLERMAN is an Associate Professor in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He also is a member of the Biotechnology Risk Assessment Steering Committee for the USDA. Dr. Hallerman’s research interests include genetic improvement of aquaculture stocks, population genetics as applied to fisheries and wildlife management, genetics education, risk assessment/management and public policy regarding genetically modified fish and shellfish. He received his Ph.D. in fisheries and allied aquacultures from Auburn University in 1984. TUNG-CHING LEE is Distinguished Professor of Food Science and Nutrition at Rutgers University. He is noted for his effective usage of basic science of chemistry and microbiology in studying applied programs in food technology. Dr. Lee’s research interests include nutritional, safety, and toxicological aspects of food processing, food nutrification, aquaculture, feed technology, and biotechnologic applications in food science and technology. He received his Ph.D. in agricultural chemistry in 1970, from the University of California, Davis. JOY A. MENCH is a professor in the Animal Science Department at the University of California, Davis. Her particular focus has been in the role of animal behavior, both social and individual, and the effects on animals of stress, crowding, handling, restraint, and other components of captivity. Dr. Mench has worked closely as a scientist and consultant with animal welfare and laboratory animal accreditation organizations over the past 15 years. She received her Ph.D. in neurobiology and ethology from the University of Sussex, England. WILLIAM M. MUIR is Professor of Breeding and Genetics in the Department of Animal Sciences at Purdue University, as well as Director of the High Definition Genomics Center. Dr. Muir’s research interests include the development of transgenic animals for enhancement of the environment and the profitability of farming, assessment of the environmental risk of transgenic

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Animal Biotechnology: Science-Based Concerns organisms, and the linkage between quantitative and molecular genetics. Dr. Muir received his Ph.D. in population genetics from Purdue University in 1977. R. MICHAEL ROBERTS is the Curator’s Professor of Animal Science and Biochemistry at the University of Missouri. He is best known for his contributions in facilitating understanding of embryo-maternal communication during the early stages of pregnancy. He was the first to discover that early placentas produce interferons that mediate maternal recognition of the embryo in cattle and sheep. Dr. Roberts received his Ph.D. in plant physiology and biochemistry from Oxford University, England, in 1965. THEODORE H. SCHETTLER is the Science Director for the Science and Environmental Health Network. He also is a Board Member for the Greater Boston Physicians for Social Responsibility (GBPSR). With GBPSR, Dr. Schettler serves as Co-Chair of the Committee on Human Health and the Environment. He holds a clinical appointment at Boston Medical Center and practices medicine at the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center. He holds an M.D. from Case-Western Reserve Medical School, and an M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health. LAWRENCE B. SCHOOK is Professor of Comparative Genomics in the Department of Animal Sciences and Veterinary Pathobiology at the University of Illinois. He also is Adjunct Professor of Veterinary Pathobiology at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Schook's professional interests include the development of genomic models to address animal health. His research laboratory has developed genetic markers and integrated maps, and has mapped economically important traits in livestock. He holds a Ph.D. in immunology from Wayne State University. MICHAEL R. TAYLOR is Senior Fellow and Director of the Risk, Resource, and Environmental Management Division at Resources for the Future (RFF), a nonprofit natural resource and environmental research organization. He also leads a research program at RFF on policy and institutional issues affecting the success of the global food and agricultural system in the areas of food security in developing countries, food safety, and the natural resource and environmental sustainability of agriculture. Previously, Mr. Taylor served as Deputy Commissioner for Policy at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and as Administrator of the Food Safety and Inspection Service of the U.S Department of Agriculture. Mr. Taylor received a J.D. in 1976 from the University of Virginia School of Law.