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APPENDICES

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A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Peter E. Castro (Chair), has more than 30 years of experience in applied mathematics and manufacturing at the Eastman Kodak Company, where he is currently senior principal scientist in the Engineering Technology Center. He served as supervisor of applied mathematics and statistics, with responsibilities for organizing, hiring, and leading mathematical personnel to provide mathematical and analysis resources. In addition, he taught for 15 years and served as chair of the applied mathematics graduate program at the University of Rochester. He was a member of the National Research Council's Board on Mathematical Sciences and has served as secretary and member of the board of trustees for the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. Erik Antonsson is professor and chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology. His research interests include formal methods for engineering design, rapid assessment of early designs, and structured microelectromechanical systems design. He is currently collaborating with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on the development of design infrastructure for advanced spacecraft. He is also working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency in the field of multiresolution simulation in engineering design. 141

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142 MODELING AND SIMULA TION IN MANUFACTURING Denis T. Clements is director of the Corporate Technology Center for Modeling and Simulation at GRC International Corporation (an AT&T company). He has been involved for over more than 20 years in the development and application of computer-based operations research techniques. His responsibilities include the development of numerous advanced analytic and decision support systems for the Department of Defense, including the development of the capstone analytic application, the Joint Warfare System. James E. Coolahan is supervisor of the modeling, simulation, and decision support group at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, where he has also served as assistant to the director for modeling and simulation. His background is in real- time data acquisition systems, simulation, software engineering, system and software conceptual development, aerospace engineering, and missile system test and evaluation. He has previously provided technical assistance to the Office of the Secretary of Defense's Simulation-Based Acquisition Task Force in developing a road map and draft implementation plan for the simulation-based acquisition initiative. Yu-Chi Ho is Gordon McKay Professor of System Engineering and T. Jefferson Coolidge Professor of Applied Mathematics at Harvard University. He is a life fellow of the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), a distinguished member of the Control Systems Society, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He has served on a variety of government and industry panels and has been active in several professional societies, including the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society, for which he served a president. His research interests lie at the intersection of control system theory, operations research, and artificial intelligence. Mary Ann Horter is director of engineering processes and tools and program director for the Virtual Product Development Initiative (VPDI) at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics. She is responsible for the development and deployment of engineering processes and tools across the company. As VPDI program director, she oversees the development of more than 50 modeling and simulation software tools that are integrated in the virtual development environment. Previously, she managed the F-22 airframe integrated product team and was responsible for the design and manufacture of the F-22 mid-fuselage. In this position, she led a multifunction organization

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APPENDIX A of more than 600 employees and was responsible for ensuring that the team met all schedule and financial objectives. Pradeep K. Khosla is the Philip and Marsha Dowd Professor of Engineering and Robotics and head of the Nepal lenient of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. While on leave from Carnegie Mellon, he served as a program manager for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) in the Software and Intelligent Systems Technology Office, the Defense Sciences Office, and the Tactical Technology Office. At DARPA, he worked in information-based design and manufacturing, Web-based information technology infrastructure and real-time planning. His research interests include Internet- enabled collaborative design and distributed simulation and manufacturing, collaborating autonomous systems, agent-based architectures for distributed design, simulation of mechatronic systems, and software composition and reconfigurable software for simulations and embedded control. He is the winner of several awards for his research and education initiatives and serves as a consultant to several companies. Jay Lee is Wisconsin Distinguished and Rockwell Automation Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Currently he serves as director of the National Science Foundation's Industry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/IJCRC) on Intelligent Maintenance Systems (IMS). Previously, he served as director for product development and manufacturing at United Technologies Corporation (UTRC; East Hartford, Connecticut), and was responsible for the strategic direction and research and development activities for next-generation products and manufacturing technologies to support United Technologies Corporation's diversified business units. Prior to joining UTRC, he served as program director for the Engineering Research Centers Program; the Industry/University Cooperative Research Centers Program; and the Design, Manufacture, and Industrial Innovation (DMII) Division at the National Science Foundation from 1991 to 1998. Currently, he is a fellow of the Society of Mechanical Engineers and serves as a member of the Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design of the National Research Council. Previously, he served as a member of the board of directors for the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences and as the chairman of the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASM. 143

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144 MODELING AND SIMULA TION IN MANUFACTURING John L. Mitchiner is manager of the Advanced Decision Support Applications Department at Sandia National Laboratories. This department builds primarily Web-based decision support tools to support teams of weapon engineers, analysts, scientists, and manufacturers in the design and production of nuclear weapon components. He is the author of numerous papers in refereed journals and conference presentations on distributed product and process design environments, a knowledge-based system for weld design and analysis known as SmartWeld, and national energy policy modeling. Mikel D. Petty is chief scientist of the Virginia Modeling, Analysis and Simulation Center and research professor in engineering management at Old Dominion University. He has worked in modeling and simulation since 1990 in the areas of simulation interoperability, computer-generated forces, multiresolution simulation, and applications of theory to simulation. Previously, he was an assistant director of the Institute for Simulation and Training at the University of Central Florida. Stuart Starr has been director of plans for the Mitre Corporation since 1985; there he assists the company's officers in four broad areas: directing major cross-corporate studies, performing technical planning, leading corporate management initiatives, and organizing and directing professional symposium and workshops. He is responsible for supporting major planning efforts for organizations such as the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Office of the Director of Central Intelligence, the Office of Science and Technology Policy, and the Transportation Research Board. Prior to joining Mitre, he was assistant vice president, M/A-COM Government Systems; director of long-range planning and systems evaluation for the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense; and senior project leader, institute for Defense Analyses. He is a fellow ofthe Military Operations Research Society, an associate fellow of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics, and a consultant to the Army Science Board. Charles L. Wu has worked at the Ford Research Laboratory for 25 years. During his early years at Ford, he was engaged in research and development on engine systems and manufacturing technology. Since 1992, he has held a number of management positions, including those of manager of the Manufacturing Systems

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APPENDIX A Department and manager of the Engine and Processes Department. He was appointed director of the Manufacturing and Vehicle Design Research Laboratory in 1996, where his responsibilities include the research and development of manufacturing systems, computer simulation of manufacturing processes, material engineering applications, vehicle safety research, and computer- aided engineering technologies. Dr. Wu has led a variety of advanced research programs, including the development of in- process and end-of-line engine diagnostics technology, machinery noise abatement, machine tool technology, manufacturing system control, advanced computer-aided design and computer-aided engineering, and rapid prototyping. He is the recipient of two Ford Research Technical Achievement Awards, the Henry Ford Technology Award, and the Innovation Award. Dr. Wu has participated in several studies in design and manufacturing sponsored by the National Science Foundation. Bernard P. Zeigler is professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Arizona, where he has served since 1985. His research interests include the methodology of modeling and simulation; distributed massively parallel simulation; modeling and design of autonomous, intelligent systems; and knowledge- based design and engineering. He served previously on two National Research Council committees: the Committee on Commercial Multimedia Technologies and the 21 st Century Army, and the Naval Studies Board's Panel on Modeling and Simulation. He is a fellow of the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers and received the highest award of the Society for Computer Simulation, for distinguished service to the profession. 145

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