• Risk assessment integrates the many factors relating to slide occurrence and consequence. It can be applied at various levels, ranging from qualitative to quantitative.

  • Mitigation takes many forms, with land use regulation being the most important. Other mitigation activities include stabilization through engineering activities and construction of diversion works.

Shaded boxes indicate activities with the highest payoff potential.

  • Debris Flow Investment in basic research to improve understanding of debris flow initiation and movement has a high payoff potential, and should precede additional efforts in technology integration and transfer. The basic scientific advances will also contribute to improved mapping, which is a priority requirement. In addition, clarification of magnitude-frequency-runout characteristics can be anticipated, and these are important for risk assessment and mitigation (including regulation). Improved mitigation methods and the establishment of appropriate risk assessment techniques are needed.

  • Rock Fall Rock fall processes are relatively simple and reasonably well understood. The FHWA (Federal Highway Administration) and some state highway departments have made substantial progress in technology integration and transfer. It appears that widespread dissemination of this information would encourage implementation and have a high payoff potential. At the same time, improved mitigation methods and the establishment of appropriate risk assessment techniques are needed.

  • Bedrock Slides There is reasonable understanding of the mechanics of bedrock slide initiation, although additional case histories would add significantly to the body of knowledge. Post-failure deformations are less understood. Bedrock slides can be identified with current technology and there is high payoff potential associated with mapping them in areas of high risk, in order to assist regulation. Improved mitigation methods and the establishment of appropriate risk assessment techniques are needed.



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