Appendix G
Biographical Information on Committee Members

M. Patricia Morse, Chair, is a marine biologist and science educator at the University of Washington, Seattle. For 34 years, she was professor of biology at Northeastern University, and the last 4 she also served as a program director at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) in the Division of Elementary, Secondary and Informal Education, where she served as a specialist in biology and environmental science in Instructional Materials Development. Dr. Morse has published extensively on molluscan biology (over 50 papers and 34 abstracts) and more recently in science education. She currently is a consultant for NSF, serving in the Division of Undergraduate Education as a site visitor to NSF-funded programs. Dr. Morse is a past president of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society and the American Society of Zoologists (now the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology). She is chair of the education committee of the American Institute of Biological Sciences and vice-chair of the International Union of Biological Sciences’ Commission for Biological Education.

Margaret Cozzens is the Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs at the University of Colorado at Denver. She received a PhD in mathematics from Rutgers University. For the 7 years prior to coming UC Denver, she was the director of the Division of Elementary, Secondary, and Informal Education at the National Science Foundation (NSF). She also served as professor and chair of mathematics at Northeastern University in Boston before coming to NSF. She is the author of five books and over 75 papers and articles in mathematics and K-20 education policy. Dr. Cozzens



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 91
Attracting PhDs to K-12 Education: A Demonstration Program for Science, Mathematics, and Technology Appendix G Biographical Information on Committee Members M. Patricia Morse, Chair, is a marine biologist and science educator at the University of Washington, Seattle. For 34 years, she was professor of biology at Northeastern University, and the last 4 she also served as a program director at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) in the Division of Elementary, Secondary and Informal Education, where she served as a specialist in biology and environmental science in Instructional Materials Development. Dr. Morse has published extensively on molluscan biology (over 50 papers and 34 abstracts) and more recently in science education. She currently is a consultant for NSF, serving in the Division of Undergraduate Education as a site visitor to NSF-funded programs. Dr. Morse is a past president of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society and the American Society of Zoologists (now the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology). She is chair of the education committee of the American Institute of Biological Sciences and vice-chair of the International Union of Biological Sciences’ Commission for Biological Education. Margaret Cozzens is the Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs at the University of Colorado at Denver. She received a PhD in mathematics from Rutgers University. For the 7 years prior to coming UC Denver, she was the director of the Division of Elementary, Secondary, and Informal Education at the National Science Foundation (NSF). She also served as professor and chair of mathematics at Northeastern University in Boston before coming to NSF. She is the author of five books and over 75 papers and articles in mathematics and K-20 education policy. Dr. Cozzens

OCR for page 91
Attracting PhDs to K-12 Education: A Demonstration Program for Science, Mathematics, and Technology currently serves on the President’s Task Force on Teacher Education (American Council of Education). She co-chairs the Third International Assessment in Mathematics and Science 8th grade repeat study (TIMSS-R) Tech-nical Review Panel. She also serves on the Education Advisory Council of the Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Task Force on Leadership for the Academic Affairs Resource Center of American Association of State Colleges and Universities. Arthur Eisenkraft is the past President of the National Science Teachers Association, Arlington, Virginia. He is also the science coordinator (6-12) and physics teacher in the Bedford Public Schools in Bedford, New York. He has taught high school physics in a variety of schools for 24 years. He is project director of Active Physics and has published more than 100 papers related to physics and physics education. He holds a U.S. patent for a laser vision testing system. Dr. Eisenkraft is a former member of the National Research Council’s (NRC) Advisory Panel to the Center for Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education (CSMEE). He served on the NRC Committee on Learning Research and Educational Practice and the NRC Working Group on Science Content Standards. He received his PhD in science education from New York University, and he received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science Teaching in 1986. Danine Ezell is a science teacher and department chair at the new charter school, Preuss School, chartered under the San Diego City Schools and associated with the University of California at San Diego. The Preuss School is designed to serve students from low-income and noncollege educated families and to prepare them for competitive 4-year colleges. Dr. Ezell previously worked as a resource teacher in the Mathematics and Science Office of San Diego City Schools and was the magnet school coordinator and teacher at Bell Junior High, a computer, mathematics, science magnet school in San Diego. Dr. Ezell is a former member of the NRC’s Advisory Panel to CSMEE. She served on the NRC Working Group on Science Content Standards and worked for many years with Project 2061. She co-chaired her school district’s efforts to develop science standards. She received a PhD in zoology from the University of California, Berkeley, and some years later obtained a teaching credential and began teaching at the secondary level in 1985. Emily Feistritzer is the president of the Center for Education Information. She has conducted several national and state studies of alternative certification programs. She is currently conducting a study on the effectiveness of such programs. She has a PhD in curriculum and instruction

OCR for page 91
Attracting PhDs to K-12 Education: A Demonstration Program for Science, Mathematics, and Technology from Indiana University, a masters in the teaching of science from the College of William and Mary, and a BA in biology from Thomas More College. Maria Alicia Lopez-Freeman is the executive director of the California Science Project, a University of California professional development network of science faculty, professional developers and teachers of K-16 science. For many years she taught chemistry and physics in large, urban, inner-city high schools, developed programs, and served as department chair. For the past 10 years she has been working in science professional development, science education research, and educational change. She has published articles in both chemistry and science education and is currently involved in developing case studies focused on the intersection of science and equity in urban schools and doing research on science teaching and learning. She was a member of the Glenn Commission for the Teaching of Mathematics and Science for the 21st Century, and she serves on the High School Science Advisory Committee of the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing, developing program standards for the licensure of high school teachers of science. She was involved with the development of the National Science Education Standards as a member of the Working Group on Science Teaching Standards. Ms. Lopez-Freeman received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Immaculate Heart College. Myles Gordon has been the vice president for education at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City since 1995. In that capacity he has engaged in a program with the City University of New York to retrain and to prepare science, math, and engineering professionals to teach in the New York City schools. Between 1970 and 1995 he worked in a variety of positions at the Education Development Center (EDC) in Newton, MA, becoming senior vice president in 1993. At EDC he was responsible for all work in science, math, and technology and led projects in curriculum development, professional development of teachers, instructional use of technology, and systemic reform. He is an advisory board member of the Association of Science and Technology Centers’ Teacher Education Leadership Institute Project, the Annenberg/CPB Guide to Mathematics and Science Reform, and the Collaboration for Equity: Women in Science (a collaborative effort of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and EDC, funded by NSF). He has served as a consultant to the Corporation for Public Broadcasting’s Regional Training Project, the Boston Public Schools, and the Educational Technology

OCR for page 91
Attracting PhDs to K-12 Education: A Demonstration Program for Science, Mathematics, and Technology Center/Harvard Graduate School of Education. He holds a BA in politics from Brandeis University. Vicki Jacobs is the associate director of the Harvard University Teacher Education Programs and director of that institution’s Mid-Career Math and Science Program (MCMS). Begun in 1983, the MCMS program has provided an alternative route to mathematics and science teacher certification in Massachusetts to mid-career scientists and mathematicians (some of whom hold Ph.D.s). She has also served as co-director of the Massachusetts Academy for Teachers. David A. Kennedy was the director of science education/ESEA Title II, Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction for the state of Washington. He is a biologist with degrees from Western Oregon University and Oregon State University. Prior to joining the superintendent’s staff, he taught science subjects at the elementary, junior and high school levels, in teacher education programs at the college level, and he was a school district science coordinator. His assignments as an instructional program specialist at the state education agency have included supervisor of environmental education, 1971-1977; supervisor of science programs, 1977-1984; and senior supervisor of science and mathematics, 1984–1992. His responsibilities from 1992-1998 were as an instructional program director for which he managed a work unit of grants managers and curriculum specialists representing all content areas. He directs science education grants programs and develops the instructional design program. He is past president of the National Council of State Science Supervisors. Mary Long is currently coordinator of UTeach, the secondary science and mathematics teacher preparation program at the University of Texas, Austin. She was a member of Office of Scientific and Engineering Personnel (OSEP)’s Committee on Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Teaching. Ms. Long taught science for 28 years in middle schools and high schools in several states. She has served as director of the Austin Independent School District Science Academy and as manager of the district’s Science and Health Resource Center. Ms. Long received a MEd degree in science education from the University of Texas, Austin. John A. Moore is a professor emeritus of biology at the University of California at Riverside. He began serving on NRC education committees in the 1950s and continues to do so to this day. He is currently a member of the Committee on Science Education, K-12, and the National Science Resources Center’s Advisory Board. His recent service to the NRC in-

OCR for page 91
Attracting PhDs to K-12 Education: A Demonstration Program for Science, Mathematics, and Technology cludes membership on the Committee on Undergraduate Science Education and several committees related to projects to produce materials for the K-12 teachers on the evolution/creationism problem. Beginning in the late 1950s, he worked with the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study, initially as the chair of the Committee of the Content of the Curriculum Study, then as supervisor for the high school textbook, “Biological Science: An Inquiry into Life.” He also worked on two experimental and three commercial editions of the middle school project “Interactions of Man & the Biosphere” (1970-1979). He also initiated and supervised “Sciences as a Way of Knowing” —a university-level project that consisted of seven yearly symposia and publications (1983-1989) and edited the 17 volumes of the graduate-level series “Genes, Cells and Organisms: Great Books in Experimental Biology.” Dr. Moore has served on the education committees of the NSF and of the AAAS (including Project 2061). Dr. Moore received AB, MA, and PhD degrees from Columbia University and has taught at Brooklyn College, Queens College, Barnard College, Columbia University, and the University of California at Riverside. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences N. Ronald Morris was chair of the OSEP Committee on Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Teaching and is a professor in the Department of Pharmacology at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School-University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (Rutgers). Dr. Morris is a cell biologist who studies nuclear migration and its regulation, using the fungus Aspergillus as a model organism. He has previously served as Associate Dean for Research at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School—University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. He received an MD from Yale University School of Medicine and a BS from Yale College. Kristina Peterson teaches chemistry and biology at the Lakeside School in Seattle, Washington. She received her PhD in analytical chemistry from the University of Washington in 1997. Before joining the Lakeside faculty, she served as a distance learning instructor, course designer, and as a science advisor to the Teacher Certification Program Wetlands Project at the University of Washington. She has been an active member of the Seattle chapter of the Association for Women in Science, serving as chair of its program committee, 1995-1996 and 1998-1999 and of its scholarship committee, 1994-1995. She was a member of OSEP’s Committee on Attracting Science and Mathematics PhDs to Secondary School Teaching.

OCR for page 91
Attracting PhDs to K-12 Education: A Demonstration Program for Science, Mathematics, and Technology Eric Robinson, a professor at Ithaca College, received his PhD in mathematics from Binghamton University. His field of published mathematical research is topology. After receiving his doctorate, he taught at Bates College prior to joining the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at Ithaca College 1979. He has served as interim associate dean of the School of Humanities and Science, and chaired the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science. In addition to his responsibilities at Ithaca, Dr. Robinson has also frequently taught preservice graduate-level content courses in mathematics in the master of arts in teaching program and Binghamton. He has done work in calculus reform, served as a program officer at the U.S. National Science Foundation in the Division of Elementary, Secondary, and Informal Education, and, since 1997, has been the director of COMPASS, the national secondary mathematics implementation center funded, in part, by NSF. James H. Stith is the director of physics programs at the American Institute of Physics. He is past President of the National Society of Black Physicists and of the American Association of Physics Teachers. He is a fellow of the AAAS and the American Physical Society and a charter fellow of the National Society of Black Physicists. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Citation by the American Association of Physics Teachers, holds the New York Academy of Science’s Archie L. Lacey Award for contributions to science education, the National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education’s (NAFEO) Distinguished Alumni Award, and was selected for Penn State University’s Superior Teaching Award. He received his PhD from Pennsylvania State University and has served on the physics faculty of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and Ohio State University. Kimberly Tanner is a NSF postdoctoral fellow at the University of California at San Francisco in science education. She is working with the UCSF Science and Health Education Partnership to: (1) determine the factors that contribute to the success of teacher-scientist partnerships; (2) evaluate the impact of these partnerships on participating students, teachers, and scientists; and (3) utilize the results of this research to create materials to facilitate teacher-scientist partnerships that can be disseminated for use by universities and school districts nationwide. She received her PhD in neuroscience from the UCSF in 1997 and a BA in biochemistry/biology from Rice University in 1991. She was a member of OSEP’s Committee on Attracting Science and Mathematics PhDs to Secondary School Teaching.