APPENDIXES



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A Century of Ecosystem Science: Planning Long-Term Research in the Gulf of Alaska APPENDIXES

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A Century of Ecosystem Science: Planning Long-Term Research in the Gulf of Alaska This page in the original is blank.

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A Century of Ecosystem Science: Planning Long-Term Research in the Gulf of Alaska A Biosketches of the Committee’s Members Michael Roman, chair, is a professor at Horn Point Environmental Laboratories at the University System of Maryland’s Center for Environmental Sciences. His research interests are biological oceanography, zooplankton ecology, food-web dynamics, estuarine and coastal interaction, and the carbon cycle in the ocean. Dr. Roman was chair of the Coastal Ocean Processes Steering Committee for the National Science Foundation and has experience leading a multidisciplinary activity. He brings a broad ecological perspective to this setting. Don Bowen is a research scientist at the Marine Fish Division of the Bedford Institute of Oceanography’s Department of Fisheries and Oceans in Canada. His research has focused on the population dynamics, foraging ecology, and ecological energetics of pinnipeds. Objectives of these studies are twofold: to understand the diversity of pinniped life histories and to understand the nature of competitive interactions between seals and commercial fisheries. Since 1997 Dr. Bowen has also conducted ecological research on the northern right whale with the aim to foster the recovery of the species. Adria A.Elskus is an assistant professor of environmental physiology at the T.H.Morgan School of Biological Sciences at the University of Kentucky. Her scientific background includes work in endocrinology, geochemistry, biochemistry, and physiology, and she has worked as a consultant in industry, as a toxicologist and chemist in government, and in academia. Her research interests include the fate and effects of con-

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A Century of Ecosystem Science: Planning Long-Term Research in the Gulf of Alaska taminants, including petroleum, in aquatic ecosystems, particularly effects on reproduction; adaptation to environmental contaminants; organic pollutant metabolism and the interplay of hormones and pollutants; and the biochemical mechanisms of pollutant effects. She also has specific experience in the analysis of samples collected from oil spill sites. John J.Goering is a professor emeritus and former associate director of the Institute of Marine Science, University of Alaska, Fairbanks. He is well known as one of the first to make significant discoveries in the areas of the marine nitrogen cycle, the silicon cycle, and silicon and nitrogen assimilation by phytoplankton. He has served as vice-president and later president of the Pacific Section of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, as chair of the Oil Spill Recovery Institute Science Advisory Committee, and as a member of the North Slope Borough Science Advisory Committee and the Coastal Marine Institute Technical Advisory Committee. George Hunt is a professor of ocean ecology at the University of California, Irvine. Dr. Hunt has published extensively on the foraging ecology of marine birds, mechanisms for trophic transfer to top predators in marine ecosystems and the impacts of oil spills on marine birds. He is currently investigating how climate variability can affect the control of energy flow in the Bering Sea. Dr. Hunt is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Ornithologists Union, and has previously served on the NRC’s Committee on Mono Basin, (1985–1987), the Ecology Subcommittee of the Committee to Review Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Studies Program (1986–1992), and the Committee to Review Alaskan Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Information (1991–1994). Seth Macinko is a assistant professor at the Department of Marine Affairs, University of Rhode Island. Previously he was a social and economic policy analyst at the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. He also fished commercially off Alaska from 1979 to 1983. His research interests are broadly focused on the interconnections between natural resource management (especially marine resources), environmental history, and political ecology. He is particularly interested in the role of institutional arrangements and culture in resource management. Current projects are focused on distributional issues involving access to marine resources property rights in marine fisheries, the role of place and community in property rights reformations, and linkages between marine resources and community development.

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A Century of Ecosystem Science: Planning Long-Term Research in the Gulf of Alaska Donal T.Manahan is the director of marine biology at the University of Southern California. He is an environmental physiologist active in many areas of science in the Antarctic, as well as in temperate regions and deep-sea hydrothermal vents. His research includes physiological ecology of early stages (larvae) of animal development, animal/chemical interactions in the ocean, and the genetic bases of physiological processes. In education he is currently the director of an international Ph.D.-level training course in Antarctica, “Integrative Biology and Adaptation of Antarctic Marine Organisms.” Dr. Manahan was the chair of the Polar Research Board from 1999 to 2002 and serves as the board’s liaison to this activity. Brenda Norcross is a professor of fisheries oceanography in the School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of Alaska, Fairbanks. Her research centers on fish and their habitats, including human-induced effects on the environment. She has studied flatfishes in Alaskan waters and has modeled nursery habitats. Dr. Norcross headed the herring component of the multi-investigator Sound Ecosystem Assessment project, which investigated the environment of Prince William Sound following the Exxon Valdez oil spill. That research resulted in a synthetic knowledge of the juvenile life stage of herring. She also has studied distribution of juvenile fishes and their availability to marine mammals, especially Steller sea lions. J.Steven Picou is a professor of sociology and chair of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of South Alabama. He is a leading authority on the social impacts of technological disasters and also has active research interests in clinical sociology and environmental sociology. From 1989 to 1992 he directed an interdisciplinary team of social scientists for assessing the community impacts of the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Dr. Picou also developed and implemented a clinical community intervention program in Cordova, Alaska, from 1994 to 1997 that was designed to reduce chronic, spill-related social and psychological impacts. At present, he is directing a long-term study of social consequences of the Exxon Valdez litigation and chronic ecological degradation in Prince William Sound, Alaska, and two projects on the health risks of consuming contaminated fish in the Mobile Bay Estuary in Alabama. Tom Royer holds the Samuel and Fay Slover Distinguished Chair in Oceanography at Old Dominion University. Dr. Royer is a leading authority on the oceanography of the Gulf of Alaska. His research interests are in deep ocean and coastal hydrography and currents, longtime series measurements, and air-sea interactions. He was at the University of Alaska for several decades, where he was one of the cornerstones of their academic and research programs and where his discovery of a significant

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A Century of Ecosystem Science: Planning Long-Term Research in the Gulf of Alaska coastal current along the coast of Alaska, driven by freshwater discharge, allowed a reasonable prediction of the trajectory of the oil released during the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. He represented the University of Alaska, Fairbanks in UNOLS for many years and led the UAF ship program. He has a very broad view of marine science, and he has seen extensive service on many panels, boards, and committees. Jennifer Ruesink is an assistant professor of zoology at the University of Washington. Her areas of academic interest include community ecology, especially food-web interactions; species invasions; the conservation of biological diversity; and ecosystem functioning. She has studied the ecological impacts of the Exxon Valdez oil spill on the ecology of tidal communities in Prince William Sound, including work with National Academy of Sciences member Dr. Robert Paine. Karl Turekian is the Silliman Professor of Geology and Geophysics at Yale University. He also is the director of the Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies and the director of the Center for the Study of Global Change. His research areas include marine geochemistry; atmospheric geochemistry of cosmogenic; radon daughter and man-made radionuclides; surficial and groundwater geochemistry of radionuclides; planetary degassing; geochronology based on uranium decay chain and radiocarbon of the Pleistocene; osmium isotope geochemistry; meteorite origins in relation to planetary systems; oceanic upwelling; and climate change. Dr. Turekian is an NAS member and has served on several NRC boards and committees including the Ocean Studies Board and the Committee on Global Change Research.