C Biographical Information for Members of the Solar and Space Physics Survey Committee

LOUIS J. LANZEROTTI, Chair, is distinguished member of the technical staff, Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies. Dr. Lanzerotti’s principal research interests have included space plasmas, geophysics, and engineering problems related to the impact of space processes on space and terrestrial technologies. He has been a coinvestigator and principal investigator on several NASA missions, including Galileo and Ulysses, and has conducted extensive ground-based and laboratory research on space and geophysics topics. He was chair (1984-1988) of NASA’s Space and Earth Science Advisory Committee and a member of the 1990 Advisory Committee on the Future of the U.S. Space Program. He has also served as chair (1988-1994) of the Space Studies Board of the National Research Council (NRC) and as a member (1991-1993) of the Vice President’s Space Policy Advisory Board. He has served on numerous NASA, National Science Foundation, and university advisory bodies concerned with space and geophysics research. He is a member of the International Academy of Astronautics and is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Geophysical Union, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the American Physical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Lanzerotti is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

ROGER L. ARNOLDY is a research professor at the University of New Hampshire (UNH). Until his recent retirement, he directed the UNH Space Science Center and was a professor in the UNH Department of Physics. Dr. Arnoldy’s research interests are in space physics, the space plasma physics of the solar wind’s interaction with Earth’s magnetic field, and auroral particle acceleration. He has served as a principal investigator for the Arctic and Antarctic magnetic pulsation studies and for more than 30 auroral sounding rocket flights. Dr Arnoldy was an investigator on some of the



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C Biographical Information for Members of the Solar and Space Physics Survey Committee LOUIS J. LANZEROTTI, Chair, is distinguished member of the technical staff, Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies. Dr. Lanzerotti’s principal research interests have included space plasmas, geophysics, and engineering problems related to the impact of space processes on space and terrestrial technologies. He has been a coinvestigator and principal investigator on several NASA missions, including Galileo and Ulysses, and has conducted extensive ground-based and laboratory research on space and geophysics topics. He was chair (1984-1988) of NASA’s Space and Earth Science Advisory Committee and a member of the 1990 Advisory Committee on the Future of the U.S. Space Program. He has also served as chair (1988-1994) of the Space Studies Board of the National Research Council (NRC) and as a member (1991-1993) of the Vice President’s Space Policy Advisory Board. He has served on numerous NASA, National Science Foundation, and university advisory bodies concerned with space and geophysics research. He is a member of the International Academy of Astronautics and is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Geophysical Union, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the American Physical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Lanzerotti is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. ROGER L. ARNOLDY is a research professor at the University of New Hampshire (UNH). Until his recent retirement, he directed the UNH Space Science Center and was a professor in the UNH Department of Physics. Dr. Arnoldy’s research interests are in space physics, the space plasma physics of the solar wind’s interaction with Earth’s magnetic field, and auroral particle acceleration. He has served as a principal investigator for the Arctic and Antarctic magnetic pulsation studies and for more than 30 auroral sounding rocket flights. Dr Arnoldy was an investigator on some of the

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earliest U.S. space missions, including Explorer VI launched in 1959—the first satellite to be orbited by NASA. He has been coinvestigator for the ECHO rocket flights and the Antarctic Penguin Automated Geophysical Observatories. Dr. Arnoldy has been a trustee of the University Space Research Association and a member of the NASA Sounding Rocket Users Committee and of the Peer Review Panel of the NASA Wallops Flight Center. Dr. Arnoldy is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union. He has more than 100 publications in refereed space physics journals. FRAN BAGENAL is a professor of astrophysical and planetary sciences and a research associate in the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her research interests include the synthesis of data analysis and theory in the study of space plasmas. She specializes in the field of planetary magnetospheres, particularly jovian magnetospheres, and solar corona. Dr. Bagenal has received six NASA Group Achievement Awards in the past 20 years. She is currently an interdisciplinary scientist for the Galileo project and a member of the New Horizons science team. She is a member of the American Astronomical Society, the American Geophysical Union, the American Physical Society, the Royal Astronomical Society, and the American Association of Physics Teachers. Dr. Bagenal was a member of the NRC Space Studies Board from 1998 to 2001. DANIEL N. BAKER is the director of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, and is a professor of astrophysical and planetary sciences. His primary research interest is the study of plasma physical and energetic particle phenomena in the planetary magnetospheres and in Earth’s magnetosphere, and he conducts research in space instrument design, space physics data analysis, and magnetospheric modeling. He joined the physics research staff at Los Alamos National Laboratory and became leader of the Space Plasma Physics Group in 1981. From 1987 to 1994, he was the chief of the Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Dr. Baker has published more than 500 papers in the refereed literature and is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and the International Academy of Astronautics. He currently serves on the NRC U.S. National Committee for the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics. He has served on numerous NRC committees and panels, including the Committee on Data Management and Computation, 1986-1987, the Committee on Solar and Space Physics, 1984-1986, and the Space Studies Board, 1995-2000.

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JAMES L. BURCH is vice president, Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), Space Science and Engineering Division. Dr. Burch was a space physicist at NASA for 6 years prior to his going to SwRI in 1977. In 1996, Dr. Burch was selected as the principal investigator for the NASA Imager for Magneto-pause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) mission, which is providing the first-ever global images of key regions of Earth’s magnetosphere as they respond to variations in the solar wind. Dr. Burch was elected a fellow of the AGU in recognition of his work in the field of space physics and aeronomy, including research on the interaction of the solar wind with Earth’s magnetosphere and the physics of the aurora. Dr. Burch has served as editor in chief of Geophysical Research Letters and as president-elect and president of the Space Physics and Aeronomy Section of the AGU. He currently serves on the governing board of the American Institute of Physics (AIP) and chairs the NRC Committee on Solar and Space Physics. ARTHUR CHARO, Study Director, received his Ph.D. in physics from Duke University in 1981 and was a postdoctoral fellow in chemical physics at Harvard University from 1982 to 1985. Dr. Charo then pursued his interests in national security and arms control at Harvard University’s Center for Science and International Affairs, where he was a fellow from 1985 to 1988. From 1988 to 1995, he worked in the International Security and Space Program in the U.S. Congress’s Office of Technology Assessment (OTA). He has been a senior program officer at the Space Studies Board (SSB) of the National Research Council since OTA’s closure in 1995. Dr. Charo is a recipient of a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship in International Security (1985-1987) and was the American Institute of Physics Congressional Science Fellow for 1988-1989. He is the author of research papers in the field of molecular spectroscopy; reports on arms control, Earth remote sensing, and space policy; and a monograph, Continental Air Defense: A Neglected Dimension of Strategic Defense (University Press of America, 1990). JOHN C. FOSTER is associate director of the Haystack Observatory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); head of the Atmospheric Sciences Group, Millstone Hill Observatory; and MIT principal research scientist. His research interests are in the physics of the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and thermosphere. Topics of particular interest to him include magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere coupling; incoherent scatter radar; plasma waves and instabilities; ionospheric convection electric fields; and midlatitude/inner-magnetosphere phenomena. Dr. Foster has also engaged in scientific collaboration with investigators at international research facili

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ties. He is currently a member of the NRC Committee on Solar and Space Physics and is a past member of the NRC Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate’s Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Research, and of the NRC U.S. National Committee for the International Union of Radio Science. PHILIP R. GOODE is director of the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) at Big Bear Lake, California; director of the Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research at the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT); distinguished professor of physics and mathematics at the NJIT; and visiting associate in physics, mathematics, and astronomy at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Goode has held research positions at Rutgers University, the University of Rochester, and the University of Arizona and was a member of the technical staff at Bell Labs. His primary research interests are the internal structure of the Sun; the nature of the Sun’s magnetic fields, flares, and coronal mass ejections; and space weather. He is also measuring and modeling Earth’s reflectance from studies of earthshine and satellite cloud cover data. Dr. Goode was a member of the NRC Panels on Management and Research in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2000, “Augustine/Blue Ribbon Panel”) and on Solar Astronomy (1998-2000), which advised the Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey Committee on scientific opportunities and priorities in the field of solar astronomy. RODERICK A. HEELIS is the Cecil and Ida Green Honors Professor of Physics and director of the William B. Hanson Center for Space Sciences at the University of Texas at Dallas. His research specialization covers planetary atmospheres, ionospheres, and magnetospheres and the physical phenomena coupling these regions. He serves as a principal investigator for grant and contract research sponsored by DOD, NASA, and NSF. Dr. Heelis is currently a member of the NASA Space Science Advisory Committee and has served on the NRC Committee on Solar and Space Physics. MARGARET G. KIVELSON is a professor of space physics in the Department of Earth and Space Sciences and the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (Space Science Center) at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her principal scientific interests are magnetospheric plasma physics of Earth and Jupiter (theory and data analysis) and interaction of flowing plasmas with planets and moons (theory, data collection, and data analysis). She is currently active in space projects including Galileo (magnetometer principal investigator), Polar (coinvestigator), and Cluster (coinvestigator). Dr. Kivelson is currently a member of the NRC Space Studies Board, and

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she is a former member of the NRC Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications and of the Committee on Solar and Space Physics. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the American Geophysical Union, the American Physical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Kivelson is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. WILLIAM S. LEWIS, Consultant, received his Ph.D. in German literature from Rice University in 1987. Since 1988, he has worked in the Space Science Department at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in San Antonio, Texas. Dr. Lewis is currently principal scientist in SwRI’s Space Science and Engineering Division. His primary research interests are the jovian and terrestrial auroras. He is currently working on the analysis of data obtained with the far-ultraviolet imager on the IMAGE spacecraft, with particular emphasis on the proton aurora. WILLIAM H. MATTHAEUS is a professor in the Bartol Research Institute at the University of Delaware. His major areas of interest include the characterization of interplanetary plasma turbulence, the identification of nonlinear dynamical processes in the solar wind using data from spacecraft observations, and the study of coronal heating mechanisms. Theoretical and computational studies of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic plasmas have also continued to be an emphasis of his work. Dr. Matthaeus is a member of NASA’s Sun-Earth Connections Advisory Subcommittee (SECAS). He is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and the American Physical Society and is a recipient of the AGU’s MacElwane Prize. FRANK B. McDONALD is senior research scientist, Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland. His current research is directed toward understanding the properties of the galactic cosmic radiation, its transport in the interstellar medium, and its modulation by our own heliosphere; the acceleration and transport of solar/interplanetary energetic particles; and the study of the dynamics of the outer heliosphere. Dr. McDonald’s research makes extensive use of the energetic particle data from Pioneer 10 and 11, on which he is the principal investigator for one of the cosmic-ray experiments, and on the Voyager cosmic-ray experiment, for which he is a coinvestigator. Dr. McDonald was chief of Goddard’s Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics, NASA chief scientist, and associate director of the Goddard Space Flight Center. He has served on several NRC

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committees related to space research and is currently a member of the NRC Committee on Solar and Space Physics. Dr. McDonald is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. EUGENE N. PARKER is the S. Chandrasekhar Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus, Departments of Astronomy and Astrophysics, and Physics, University of Chicago. Dr. Parker is one of the nation’s most distinguished theoretical astrophysicists and is a recipient of numerous prizes from his peers. His extensive NRC service includes serving as chair of the NAS Astronomy Section from 1983 to 1986. Dr. Parker’s current research interests include theoretical plasma physics; magnetohydrodynamics; solar and terrestrial physics; basic physics of the active star; application and extension of classical physics to the active conditions found in the astronomical universe (e.g., the stellar x-ray corona); and the solar wind and the origin of stellar and galactic magnetic fields. Dr. Parker served as chair of the NRC Task Group on Ground-Based Solar Research (1997-1998) and is currently a member of the NRC Committee on Solar and Space Physics. Dr. Parker is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. GEORGE C. REID currently holds an appointment as a senior research scientist in the University of Colorado’s Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences in Boulder. His research activities have included the physics of solar energetic particles and their interaction with the atmosphere, the dynamics and chemistry of the middle atmosphere, and most recently the mechanisms of global climate change, with emphasis on the tropics and including especially the influence of solar variability. Dr. Reid’s career includes various positions with the NOAA Aeronomy Laboratory (1970-1998) and Space Environment Laboratory (1963-1970) in Boulder, Colorado. He has also served as Associate Professor of Geophysical Research at the University of Alaska (1958-1960) and in adjunct positions at the University of Colorado and Colorado State University. He has served on numerous committees of the NRC, as editor-in-chief of the Journal of Geophysical Research (Space Physics), and as president of the Space Physics and Aeronomy section of the American Geophysical Union. He is a fellow of AGU and a recipient of the U.S. Commerce Department’s Gold Medal. ROBERT W. SCHUNK is a professor and the director of the Center for Atmospheric and Space Science, Utah State University. His expertise is in plasma physics, fluid mechanics, aeronomy, space physics, electricity and magnetism, and data analysis. Dr. Schunk has developed numerous com-

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puter models of space physics phenomena, regions, and spacecraft-environment interactions. He has published more than 300 papers in the refereed literature, comparing model predictions with measurements, with many of them using data from several coherent and incoherent scatter radars, ionosondes, rockets, satellites, and the space shuttle. He is vice chair of Commission C of COSPAR, a vice chair of Division II of IAGA, and a member of Commissions G and H of the International Union of Radio Science. Dr. Schunk has served on several NRC committees related to space science and is currently a member of the Committee on Solar and Space Physics. He received the Governor’s Medal for Science and Technology from the State of Utah and is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union. ALAN M. TITLE is a senior fellow at the Lockheed Martin Space Systems Advanced Technology Center in Palo Alto, a consulting professor of physics at Stanford University, and co-director of the Stanford-Lockheed Institute for Space Research. Dr. Title’s primary research areas are solar magnetic and velocity fields; optical interferometers, in particular ultranarrow optical filters; high-resolution observations using active and adaptive optical systems; and data analysis systems for image analysis. Dr. Title is the principal investigator for the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) mission, which is making space-based observations of the Sun to study the connection between its magnetic fields and the heating of the corona. Dr. Title was a member of the most recent NRC decadal Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey Committee and served on the NRC Panel for Review of the Explorer Program. He also served as a member of the NRC Committee on Solar and Space Physics and of the Space Studies Board. Dr. Title is the recipient in 2001 of the George Ellery Hale Prize of the Solar Physics Division of the American Astronomical Society. Dr. Title is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

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