Appendix C
Committee and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

STANLEY M. LEMON, M.D. (Chair), is dean of the School of Medicine, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, in addition to his current service as professor of microbiology and immunology and internal medicine. A graduate of Princeton University and the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, he has previously held academic appointments at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and served from 1977 to 1983 as a staff physician and as an infectious disease officer at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. He serves as chair of the U.S. Hepatitis Panel of the U.S.–Japan Cooperative Medical Science Program (U.S. Public Health Service) and as vice chair of the Forum on Emerging Infections of the Board on Global Health (Institute of Medicine). He has previously chaired the Advisory Committee on Vaccines and Related Biologics of the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (Food and Drug Administration) and the Steering Committee on Poliovirus and Hepatitis Viruses of the Programme for Vaccine Development (World Health Organization). He has served on the Executive Committee of the International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses (International Union of Microbiologic Sciences) and the Nominating Committee of the American Society for the Advancement of Science. His professional society memberships include the American Clinical and Climatologic Society, the Association of American Physicians, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the American Society of Virology, and the American Society for Microbiology. Dr. Lemon is the recipient of the Meritorious Service Medal, U.S. Army (1983), and the Commissioner’s Special Citation, Food and Drug Administration (1996).



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Protecting Our Forces: Improving Vaccine Acquisition and Availability in the U.S. Military Appendix C Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE MEMBERS STANLEY M. LEMON, M.D. (Chair), is dean of the School of Medicine, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, in addition to his current service as professor of microbiology and immunology and internal medicine. A graduate of Princeton University and the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, he has previously held academic appointments at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and served from 1977 to 1983 as a staff physician and as an infectious disease officer at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. He serves as chair of the U.S. Hepatitis Panel of the U.S.–Japan Cooperative Medical Science Program (U.S. Public Health Service) and as vice chair of the Forum on Emerging Infections of the Board on Global Health (Institute of Medicine). He has previously chaired the Advisory Committee on Vaccines and Related Biologics of the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (Food and Drug Administration) and the Steering Committee on Poliovirus and Hepatitis Viruses of the Programme for Vaccine Development (World Health Organization). He has served on the Executive Committee of the International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses (International Union of Microbiologic Sciences) and the Nominating Committee of the American Society for the Advancement of Science. His professional society memberships include the American Clinical and Climatologic Society, the Association of American Physicians, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the American Society of Virology, and the American Society for Microbiology. Dr. Lemon is the recipient of the Meritorious Service Medal, U.S. Army (1983), and the Commissioner’s Special Citation, Food and Drug Administration (1996).

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Protecting Our Forces: Improving Vaccine Acquisition and Availability in the U.S. Military CHARLES C. J. CARPENTER, M.D., is professor of medicine at Brown University and director of the Brown University International Health Institute. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and has held offices in several national professional organizations. He chairs the AIDS Research Advisory Committee of the National Institutes of Health, is a member of the Committee on Guidelines for Antiretroviral Therapy of the Department of Health and Human Services, was a member of the Institute of Medicine panel on Priorities in Vaccine Development, and has served on numerous scientific advisory committees and panels. He is a principal investigator associated with the Lifespan/Tufts/Brown Center for AIDS Research, is the chair of the U.S. Delegation of the U.S.–Japan Cooperative Medical Sciences Program, and has served as chair of the American Board of Internal Medicine and as president of the Association of American Physicians. He has received several awards for outstanding contributions to medicine. CIRO A. de QUADROS, M.D., M.P.H., is director of the Division of Vaccines and Immunization, Pan American Health Organization. Dr. de Quadros served as a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Microbial Threats to Health and as a member of the Institute of Medicine Steering Committee on the Children’s Vaccine Initiative. He is a member of the American Public Health Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Global Health Council, the American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, and the European Society of Microbiology and Infectious Disease. His areas of interest and expertise include epidemiology, disease control, maternal and child health, vaccinology, and vaccine research. Dr. de Quadros has received many honors and awards including the 1988 Dean’s Medal awarded by the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, the 1990 International Child Survival Award from the USA Committee for UNICEF and the Carter Center, and the year 2000 Albert B. Sabin Gold Medal awarded by the Sabin Vaccine Institute. R. GORDON DOUGLAS, Jr., M.D., is a former president of the Merck Vaccine Division, Merck & Co. Inc., (he retired in May 1999). Until his retirement, he was primarily responsible for the research, development, and manufacturing and marketing of Merck’s vaccine products. Prior to joining Merck in 1989, Dr.Douglas was a career physician and academician, specializing in infectious diseases. From 1982 to 1990 he was professor of medicine and chairman, Department of Medicine, Cornell University Medical College, and physician-in-chief, The New York Hospital. He also served as head of the Infectious Disease Unit at the University of Rochester School of Medicine. Dr. Douglas is a graduate of Princeton University and Cornell University Medical College. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, the Association of American Physicians, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and numerous other organizations and has served on the National Vaccine Advisory Committee.

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Protecting Our Forces: Improving Vaccine Acquisition and Availability in the U.S. Military LAWRENCE O. GOSTIN, J.D., LL.D. (Hon.), is professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center, professor of law and public health at the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, and co-director of the Johns Hopkins/Georgetown Program on Law and Public Health. Professor Gostin is a visiting scholar at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Oxford University. He is also a fellow of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics of Georgetown University and a member of the Steering and Executive Committees of the Georgetown University Institute for Health Care Research and Policy. Professor Gostin is the editor of the “Health Law and Ethics” section of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Professor Gostin has served as a member of many Institute of Medicine committees, including the Committee on Battlefield Radiation Exposure Criteria. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. M. CAROLYN HARDEGREE, M.D., recently retired as director of the Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration. She serves as a member of the World Health Organization Steering Committee on Immunization Safety and as a member of the National Vaccine Advisory Committee’s Pandemic Influenza Working Group. She has previously served as a member or liaison of various government and nongovernment committees and groups, including the Institute of Medicine Vaccine Safety Forum and the Institute of Medicine Committee to Study the Interaction of Drugs, Biologics, and Chemicals in Deployed U.S. Military Forces. Dr. Hardegree’s research has been in the area of bacterial toxins and vaccines. Her honors include the Department of Health and Human Services Secretary’s Award for Distinguished Service and the Food and Drug Administration Distinguished Alumnus Award. SAMUEL L. KATZ, M.D., is the Wilburt Cornell Davison Professor and chairman emeritus of pediatrics at Duke University. His career has been devoted to infectious disease research, focusing principally on vaccine research and development. Dr. Katz’s research included an extensive collaborative effort with Nobel Laureate John F. Enders at Boston Children’s Hospital, during which time they developed the attenuated measles virus vaccine now used throughout the world. Dr. Katz has chaired the Committee on Infectious Diseases of the American Academy of Pediatrics (the Redbook Committee), the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, several World Health Organization panels and panels on the Children’s Vaccine Initiative and human immunodeficiency virus. He has been president of the American Pediatric Society and the Association of Medical School Pediatric Department chair. He is the coeditor (with A. Gershon and P. Hotez) of a textbook (now in its tenth edition) on infectious diseases. He chaired the Board of the

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Protecting Our Forces: Improving Vaccine Acquisition and Availability in the U.S. Military Burroughs Wellcome Fund. Dr. Katz is a member of the Institute of Medicine and has been a member of many Institute of Medicine committees including the Committee on Establishing Vaccine Development Priorities for the United States (1995–1999), the Forum on Emerging Infections (1996–1999), the Committee on Child Health in the Former Yugoslavia (1995), the Committee for the Children’s Vaccine Initiative—Continuing Activities (1995), the Committee for a Study of Public/Private Sector Relations in Vaccine Innovation (1985), and the Committee on Issues and Priorities for New Vaccine Development (1982–1986). F. MARC LaFORCE, M.D., has recently become the director of the Meningitis Vaccine Project, a joint endeavor between the World Health Organization and the Program for Appropriate Technology in Health. Dr. LaForce has had a longstanding interest in national and international immunization policies. He has held academic appointments at the University of Colorado and the University of Rochester, where he is now a clinical professor of medicine. Dr. LaForce has also served as the director of BASICS II, a large child survival project funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development, and as an epidemic intelligence service officer in the U.S. Public Health Service. He is a member of the American Epidemiological Society, the Society of General Internal Medicine, and the Society of Hospital Epidemiologists of America. STANLEY A. PLOTKIN, M.D., is a medical and scientific consultant, Aventis Pasteur, after 7 years as medical and scientific director, Pasteur Merieux Connaught Vaccines, Paris, France. He is also emeritus professor of pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania and emeritus professor of virology at the Wistar Institute. Over the course of his career he has served as senior assistant surgeon, Epidemic Intelligence Service, U.S. Public Health Service, and as associate chairman, Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Plotkin has developed many vaccines, including the rubella vaccine, RA27/3 strain, now exclusively used in the United States and throughout the world. He has held editorial positions with many scholarly journals and is a member of numerous professional and scientific societies, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Society for Pediatric Research, the American Society for Microbiology, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and the American Epidemiologic Society. Dr. Plotkin has received several professional awards including the French Legion Medal of Honor (1998); the Clinical Virology Award, Pan American Group for Rapid Viral Diagnosis (1995); the Distinguished Physician Award, Pediatric Infectious Disease Society (1993); and the Bruce Medal of the American College of Physicians (1987). GREGORY A. POLAND, M.D., is professor of medicine, infectious diseases, molecular pharmacology, and experimental therapeutics, Mayo Medical School. He is vice chair of the Department of Medicine for Research and director of the

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Protecting Our Forces: Improving Vaccine Acquisition and Availability in the U.S. Military Mayo Vaccine Group. He is president of the International Society for Vaccines and American editor for the journal Vaccine. He also directs the Outpatient General Clinical Research Center and Immunization Clinic and Services for the Mayo Clinic. His professional memberships include the International Society for Vaccines, the National Coalition for Adult Immunization, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and the American College of Physicians. He also serves as a member of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Healthy People 2010 Immunization and Infectious Diseases Objectives Working Group, the National Vaccine Advisory Committee, and the U.S. Public Health Service Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice: Vaccination and Bioterrorism. N. REGINA RABINOVICH, M.D., M.P.H., is director of the Malaria Health Initiative, which is funded by a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, administered by the Program for Appropriate Technology in Health. Previously, she served as the chief of the Clinical and Regulatory Affairs Branch and the Clinical Studies Section of the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health. Dr. Rabinovich serves as a consultant for the Vaccines and Related Biologicals Advisory Committee, Food and Drug Administration. In the past she has served as National Institutes of Health liaison to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Committee on Immunization Practices and as chair of the Epidemiology Section of the American Academy of Pediatrics. PHILIP K. RUSSELL, M.D., recently became a special advisor on vaccine development and production to the newly created Office of Public Health Preparedness, Department of Health and Human Services. Dr. Russell is also professor emeritus, Department of International Health, at the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. From 1959 to 1990 he served in the U.S. Army Medical Corps, retiring as a Major General and Assistant Surgeon General for Research and Development. He has expertise in infectious diseases, tropical medicine, virology, immunology, and vaccines. Dr. Russell has served on the Board of Scientific Counselors for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Center for Infectious Diseases, the Scientific Advisory Group of Experts for the World Health Organization Programme on Vaccine Development, the Presidential Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments, Defense Science Board task forces on chemical weapons and biological defense, and numerous committees of the National Academies. He has received the Order of Military Medical Merit and the Distinguished Service Medal and is a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. RONALD J. SALDARINI, Ph.D., retired in 1999 as president of Wyeth-Lederle Vaccines & Pediatrics business group. Before joining American Home Products

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Protecting Our Forces: Improving Vaccine Acquisition and Availability in the U.S. Military Corporation, Dr. Saldarini was president of the Lederle Praxis Biologicals Division of the American Cyanamid Company. He is on the Board of Trustees of the National Foundation of Infectious Diseases and the Infectious Disease Institute of New Jersey. He is a member of the Board of Directors Partnership for Prevention, the Presidents Corporate Council for the Children’s Health Fund, the Board of Directors of the Institute for the Advanced Studies of Immunology and Aging, the Policy Board of the Albert B. Sabin Vaccine Foundation, and the Immunization Advisory Council of the New York State Department of Health. He remains a member of several professional societies including Sigma Xi. MARY E. WILSON, M.D., is associate professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School; associate professor, Department of Population and International Health, Harvard School of Public Health; and chief of infectious diseases, Mount Auburn Hospital. She is also the author and editor of numerous books and articles including Disease in Evolution: Global Changes and Emergence of Infectious Disease. Dr. Wilson serves as a consultant on the Travel Advisory Board of Merck & Co.’s Vaccine Division. She is a member of the editorial advisory boards of the journals Global Change and Human Health, Clinical Infectious Diseases, and Emerging Infectious Diseases. Dr. Wilson has served on the Institute of Medicine Committee on the Elimination of Tuberculosis in the United States and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and currently serves on the Institute of Medicine Committee on Microbial Threats to Health in the 21st Century. STUDY STAFF SUSAN THAUL, Ph.D., is the director of this study. With the Medical Followup Agency of the Institute of Medicine, she produced The Five Series Study: Mortality of Military Participants in U.S. Nuclear Weapons Tests (2000) and the 1999 report Potential Radiation Exposure in Military Operations: Protecting the Soldier Before, During, and After and coauthored the 1996 report Mortality of Veteran Participants in the CROSSROADS Nuclear Test. Dr. Thaul had previously led Institute of Medicine projects in women’s health, national statistics, and health services research, among others. She received a Ph.D. in epidemiology from Columbia University and an M.S. in health policy and management from Harvard University. Heading the health staff of the U.S. Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs (then chaired by Senator Alan Cranston), Dr. Thaul developed legislation in preventive health care and research, women’s health care, sexual assault services and prevention, nurse and physician pay, and health effects of environmental hazards during service. Earlier positions were with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Harlem Hospital Prevention of Prematurity Project, and the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation.

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Protecting Our Forces: Improving Vaccine Acquisition and Availability in the U.S. Military SALEM FISSEHA is a research assistant with the Medical Follow-up Agency, Institute of Medicine. She received a bachelor of arts degree in anthropology from Harvard College in 1997. She plans to pursue a master’s degree at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in September 2002. RICHARD N. MILLER, M.D., M.P.H., is the director of the Medical Follow-up Agency of the Institute of Medicine, a position he took upon retiring, as Colonel, from the U.S. Army. Dr. Miller’s work in infectious diseases research, teaching of the Army Tropical Medicine Course, and serving as the Director of the Preventive Medicine Residency at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research capped a career of almost thirty years in military preventive medicine and public health, a large part of which was spent in overseas locations. HEATHER O’MAONAIGH, M.A., has served as a staff member with the Institute of Medicine since 1998. She holds a master’s degree in demography from Georgetown University and a bachelor of science degree in sociology from Western Washington University. PAMELA RAMEY-MCCRAY is the administrative assistant for the Medical Follow-up Agency.

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