Cover Image

PAPERBACK
$34.75



View/Hide Left Panel

Appendix

Workshop Materials

AGENDA

April 10, 2002

8:45-9:30 a.m.

Introductions and Purpose of the Workshop

Jane L. Ross, Director, Center for Social and Economic Studies

  • Welcome and Background for the Meeting

Raynard Kington, Director, Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, National Institutes of Health

  • NIH’s Interest

E. Richard Brown, Workshop Chair, UCLA Center for Health Policy Research

  • Goals and Format of the Meeting

9:30-10:45 a.m.

Session I: The Health Status of Hispanics

Jennifer Madans, Associate Director for Science, National Center for Health Statistics

Joe Fred Gonzalez, Office of Research and Methodology, National Center for Health Statistics



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 39
Emerging Issues in Hispanic Health: Summary of a Workshop Appendix Workshop Materials AGENDA April 10, 2002 8:45-9:30 a.m. Introductions and Purpose of the Workshop Jane L. Ross, Director, Center for Social and Economic Studies Welcome and Background for the Meeting Raynard Kington, Director, Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, National Institutes of Health NIH’s Interest E. Richard Brown, Workshop Chair, UCLA Center for Health Policy Research Goals and Format of the Meeting 9:30-10:45 a.m. Session I: The Health Status of Hispanics Jennifer Madans, Associate Director for Science, National Center for Health Statistics Joe Fred Gonzalez, Office of Research and Methodology, National Center for Health Statistics

OCR for page 39
Emerging Issues in Hispanic Health: Summary of a Workshop Elizabeth Arias, Division of Vital Statistics, National Center for Health Statistics What are the most common sources of morbidity, mortality, and acute and chronic illnesses in the Hispanic community, and how do they differ by national origin? What is the status of infant mortality and teen fertility? What are the health outcomes of Hispanics as they differ by national origin? What health patterns emerge for various age groups in the Hispanic population (e.g., children, adolescents, adults, elderly)? Who are the most vulnerable groups within the Hispanic population? What public health and mental health issues are most important (e.g., domestic violence, victims of violent crime, alcoholism)? Are there important workforce issues (e.g., occupational hazards, particular health risks to low-income workers or migrant laborers) that affect Hispanic health? 10:45-11:00 a.m. Break 11:00 a.m.-12:45 p.m. Session II: Determinants of Health: Exploring the Effects of Socioeconomic Status and Sociocultural and Behavioral Influences Nancy Landale, Department of Sociology and Demography and Population Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University Sylvia Guendelman, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley Kyriakos Markides, Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, University of Texas Medical Branch

OCR for page 39
Emerging Issues in Hispanic Health: Summary of a Workshop What factors make Hispanics vulnerable to leading causes of morbidity, mortality, and chronic illness? What are the basic determinants of critical issues in Hispanic health? What sociocultural factors are important influences on Hispanic health, and what roles do immigration, acculturation, and close ties to one’s country of origin play in shaping health outcomes? What can the healthy immigrant phenomenon and Hispanic paradox tell us about the possibility of capitalizing on protective factors for Hispanic health? How do language and social capital influence the health outcomes of Hispanics? 12:45-1:30 p.m. Lunch 1:30-3:00 p.m. Session III: Health Insurance and Access to Care E. Richard Brown, Workshop Chair, UCLA Center for Health Policy Research Claudia Schur, Project HOPE, Center for Health Affairs Michael Perry, Lake, Snell, Perry & Associates To what extent do Hispanics have health insurance, and what are the barriers to obtaining insurance? How do immigration, citizenship, and length of time in the United States affect access to health care coverage? To what extent are Hispanics able to access health care? What are the barriers preventing Hispanics from seeking care compared to similarly insured groups? 3:00-3:15 p.m. Break

OCR for page 39
Emerging Issues in Hispanic Health: Summary of a Workshop 3:15-4:30 p.m. Session IV: Emerging Challenges and Formulating an Approach for the Larger Study William Vega, Department of Psychiatry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical Center Fernando A. Guerra, San Antonio Metropolitan Health District What other health issues loom on the horizon for Hispanics (e.g., by age, national origin), and what data and resources are available to explore these topics? What are the special health concerns, risk factors, and vulnerabilities of Hispanic infants, children, adolescents, and the elderly? What institutions are best positioned to provide care to Hispanic children? What are the key mental health issues for Hispanic communities, and what segments of the population are most vulnerable? What are the methodological challenges in collecting data on Hispanics (e.g., small samples, heterogeneity, need for qualitative research)? 4:30-5:00 p.m. Next Steps and Discussion 5:00-5:30 p.m. Wrap-up Comments 5:30 p.m. Adjourn

OCR for page 39
Emerging Issues in Hispanic Health: Summary of a Workshop PARTICIPANTS Elizabeth Arias, Division of Vital Statistics, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD Angela Bates, Office of Research on Women’s Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Cheryl Boyce, Division of Mental Disorders, Behavioral Research, and AIDS, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD E. Richard Brown, Center for Health Policy Research, School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles Helen Burstin, Center for Primary Care Research, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD Virginia S. Cain, Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Lynda T. Carlson, Division of Science Resources Statistics, National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA Rebecca Clark, Demographic and Behavioral Sciences Branch, Center for Population Research, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD Barney Cohen, Committee on Population, National Research Council, Washington, DC Pamela S. Dickson, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, NJ Michelle McEnvoy Doty, The Commonwealth Fund, New York, NY Valerie Durrant, Committee on Population, National Research Council, Washington, DC V. Jeffery Evans, Demographic and Behavioral Sciences Branch, Center for Population Research, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD Jacob Feldman, Project HOPE, Center for Health Affairs, Bethesda, MD Lawrence Fine, Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Joe Fred Gonzalez, Jr., Office of Research and Methodology, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD Sylvia Guendelman, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley Fernando A. Guerra, San Antonio Metropolitan Health District, San Antonio, TX Donald J. Hernandez, Department of Sociology, State University of New York at Albany

OCR for page 39
Emerging Issues in Hispanic Health: Summary of a Workshop Thomas Hertz, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC Robert Hiatt, Cancer Control & Population Services, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD Joah G. Iannotta, Center for Social and Economic Studies, National Research Council, Washington, DC Ana-Maria Ignat, Committee on Population, National Research Council, Washington, DC Mireille Kanda, Office of Population Affairs, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD Raynard Kington, Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Nancy S. Landale, Population Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University Kim Lochner, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, NJ Jennifer Madans, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD Kyriakos S. Markides, Division of Sociomedical Sciences, Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, University of Texas Medical Branch Faith Mitchell, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, National Research Council, Washington, DC Alberto Palloni, Department of Sociology, University of Wisconsin, Madison Yolanda Partida, Hablamos Juntos, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Claremont, CA Michael Perry, Lake, Snell, Perry & Associates, Washington, DC Holly Reed, Committee on Population, National Research Council, Washington, DC Elena Rios, National Hispanic Medical Association, Washington, DC Jane L. Ross, Center for Social and Economic Studies, National Research Council, Washington, DC Cathy Schoen, Health Policy, Research, and Evaluation, The Commonwealth Fund, New York, NY Claudia L. Schur, Project HOPE, Center for Health Affairs, Bethesda, MD Andrea Steege, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Cincinnati, OH

OCR for page 39
Emerging Issues in Hispanic Health: Summary of a Workshop William Vega, Department of Psychiatry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ Charles Wells, Health Disparities and Public Health Sciences, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

OCR for page 39
Emerging Issues in Hispanic Health: Summary of a Workshop The Committee on Population was established by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 1983 to bring the knowledge and methods of the population sciences to bear on major issues of science and policy. The Committee’s work includes both basic studies of fertility, health and mortality, and migration; and applied studies aimed at improving programs for the public health and welfare in the United States and in developing countries. The Committee also fosters communication among researchers in different disciplines and countries and policy makers in government and international agencies. The work of the committee is made possible by the support of several government agencies and private foundations.