Appendix

BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON THE COMMITTEE ON ESTIMATING THE HEALTH-RISK-REDUCTION BENEFITS OF PROPOSED AIR POLLUTION REGULATIONS

JOHN C. BAILAR, III, is professor emeritus at the University of Chicago. He is a retired commissioned officer of the U.S. Public Health Service and worked for the National Cancer Institute for 22 years. He has also held academic appointments at Harvard University and McGill University. Dr. Bailar’s research interests include assessing health risks from chemical hazards and air pollutants and interpreting statistical evidence in medicine with a special emphasis on cancer. He was editor-in-chief of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute for 6 years and a member of the editorial board of the New England Journal of Medicine for 7 years. Dr. Bailar was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1993 and is a member of the International Statistical Institute. He received his M.D. from Yale University and his Ph.D. in statistics from American University.

HUGH ROSS ANDERSON is a professor of epidemiology and public health and the chairman of the Department of Public Health Sciences at St. George’s Hospital Medical School in London, England. The focus of his research is on the short- and long-term health effects of air pollution with an emphasis on the relationships between daily variations in air pollution and mortality, hospital admissions, and medical consultations. He has conducted



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Estimating the Public Health Benefits of Proposed Air Pollution Regulations Appendix BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON THE COMMITTEE ON ESTIMATING THE HEALTH-RISK-REDUCTION BENEFITS OF PROPOSED AIR POLLUTION REGULATIONS JOHN C. BAILAR, III, is professor emeritus at the University of Chicago. He is a retired commissioned officer of the U.S. Public Health Service and worked for the National Cancer Institute for 22 years. He has also held academic appointments at Harvard University and McGill University. Dr. Bailar’s research interests include assessing health risks from chemical hazards and air pollutants and interpreting statistical evidence in medicine with a special emphasis on cancer. He was editor-in-chief of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute for 6 years and a member of the editorial board of the New England Journal of Medicine for 7 years. Dr. Bailar was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1993 and is a member of the International Statistical Institute. He received his M.D. from Yale University and his Ph.D. in statistics from American University. HUGH ROSS ANDERSON is a professor of epidemiology and public health and the chairman of the Department of Public Health Sciences at St. George’s Hospital Medical School in London, England. The focus of his research is on the short- and long-term health effects of air pollution with an emphasis on the relationships between daily variations in air pollution and mortality, hospital admissions, and medical consultations. He has conducted

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Estimating the Public Health Benefits of Proposed Air Pollution Regulations epidemiological studies to investigate the health effects of an air pollution episode in London in 1991 and to assess the risk factors for asthma deaths. Dr. Anderson is a member of the steering group of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood, the U.K. Department of Health’s Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollution, and the U.K. Department of Environment’s Expert Panel on Air Quality Standards. He also served as a member of several World Health Organization working groups on air pollution. Dr. Anderson received his M.D. from Melbourne University in Australia. MAUREEN L. CROPPER is a professor of economics at the University of Maryland, a lead economist at the World Bank, and a university fellow at Resources for the Future. She is past president of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists and a former chair of the Advisory Council for Clean Air Act Compliance Analysis, a subcommittee of EPA's Science Advisory Board. Her research has focused on valuing environmental amenities (especially environmental health effects), on the discounting of future health benefits, and on the tradeoffs implicit in environmental regulations. Her recent research focuses on factors affecting deforestation in developing countries and on the externalities associated with motorization. Dr. Cropper received her Ph.D. in economics from Cornell University. JOHN S. EVANS is a senior lecturer on environmental sciences and the codirector of the Program in Environmental Science and Risk Management at the Harvard School of Public Health. His research focuses on risk assessment, uncertainty analysis, and decision-making in environmental health. Dr. Evans has developed and applied approaches for quantitatively characterizing the uncertainty in health risk assessments and for analyzing the value of information provided by alternative research strategies. He received a Sc.D. in environmental health sciences from Harvard University. DALE B. HATTIS is a research professor at the George Perkins Marsh Institute at Clark University. His research focuses on the development and application of methods to assess the health impacts of regulatory options. His emphasis is on incorporating interindividual variability data into risk assessments for both cancer and noncancer end points. He has served as a member of several NRC committees (such as the Committee on Neuro-

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Estimating the Public Health Benefits of Proposed Air Pollution Regulations toxicology and Models for Assessing Risk and the Subcommittee on Methyl Bromide). Dr. Hattis received his Ph.D. in genetics from Stanford University. ROGENE F. HENDERSON is the deputy director of the National Environmental Respiratory Center at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Her research interests include biochemistry of the lung and the pharmacokinetics of inhaled xenobiotics. She has extensively studied the use of biomarkers to predict environmental exposures and health outcomes. She has served on numerous NRC committees (such as the Committee on Epidemiology of Air Pollutants and Committee on Risk Assessment Methodology). She has served as the chair of the Committee on Toxicology and is currently serving on the Board of Environmental Studies and Toxicology. Dr. Henderson received her Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Texas at Austin and is a diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology. PATRICK L. KINNEY is an associate professor at the Columbia University School of Public Health. He conducts epidemiological research on the respiratory health impacts of air pollution with an emphasis on characterization of human exposure. His current research includes investigating the relationship between indoor air pollutants and asthma; characterizing outdoor, indoor, and personal concentrations of a variety of toxic air pollutants to which urban residents are exposed; and assessing exposures and health impacts of air pollution at the cellular and molecular level. He served on the NRC Committee on an Assessment of Asthma and Indoor Air Quality. Dr. Kinney received his Sc.D. in environmental science and physiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. NINO KÜNZLI is an assistant professor (PD) at the Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine in the Department of Environmental Health at the University of Basel, Switzerland. His research focus is environmental epidemiology with an emphasis on air pollution epidemiology. He has completed a European assessment of the public health impact of outdoor and traffic-related air pollution. He is a member of the World Health Organization (WHO) Air Pollution Health Impact Assessment Working Group. Dr. Künzli received his M.D. from the University of Basel and his M.P.H. and Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. In September 2002,

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Estimating the Public Health Benefits of Proposed Air Pollution Regulations Dr. Künzli became associate professor at University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Health. BART D. OSTRO is chief of the Air Pollution and Epidemiology Unit, Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, Oakland. His research activities have included developing a method for estimating air pollution health effects for the World Health Organization, evaluating health and economic consequences of air pollution in developing countries for the World Bank, and conducting epidemiological studies of the health effects of air pollution. He was the coauthor of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency health and economic assessment that resulted in the ban of leaded gasoline, and his work has contributed to the development of state and federal ambient air quality standards. Dr. Ostro received his Ph.D. in health economics from Brown University and a certification in environmental epidemiology from the State of California. CHARLES POOLE is an associate professor of epidemiology at the School of Public Health of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research focus is the development and application of general epidemiological principles and methods. These include problem conceptualization, study design, data collection, analysis, and interpretation. He is a member of the Solvent Panel of the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Gulf War and Health: Review of the Literature on Pesticides and Solvents. Dr. Poole received his M.P.H. in health administration from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and his Sc.D. in epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health. KIRK R. SMITH is a professor and chair of the Division of Environmental Health Sciences at the University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Smith first identified, characterized, and quantified indoor air pollution in poor countries as the major source of air pollution exposure and as one of the most significant environmental health risks. Currently, he is investigating the application of total exposure assessment methods to develop cost-effective strategies for urban and rural pollution control and is involved in on-site air-pollution, greenhouse gas, and health-impacts monitoring in Asia and Latin America. Dr. Smith was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in

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Estimating the Public Health Benefits of Proposed Air Pollution Regulations 1997 and serves on the NRC Board of Environmental Studies and Toxicology as well as the NRC Committee on Collaborative Opportunities with India in Energy and Environment. He received his Ph.D. and M.P.H. from the University of California at Berkeley. PETER A. VALBERG is a principal at Gradient Corporation in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He specializes in human health risk assessment, human toxicology, and biological modeling of human exposure to environmental chemicals and has particular expertise in health effects of air pollutants. From 1985 to 2000, he was an associate or adjunct professor of physiology at the Harvard School of Public Health and conducted research on human health effects of air toxics, methods to measure lung macrophage function, and lung deposition and clearance of radioactive tracer particles. Dr. Valberg received a Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University and an M.S. in human physiology and inhalation toxicology from the Harvard School of Public Health. SCOTT L. ZEGER is a professor and chair of the Department of Biostatistics at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. His research is on the use of regression analyses for correlated responses. He has extended generalized linear models to situations in which observations occur in clusters, such as in longitudinal, time-series, or genetic studies. Dr. Zeger served on the NRC Committee on Health Effects Associated with Exposure During the Persian Gulf War. He received his Ph.D. from Princeton University.