TABLE 2-1 Elements of Selected EPA Benefits Analyses

Parameters

PM and Ozone NAAQS (EPA 1997)a

Tier 2 Emissions and Gasoline Sulfur Standards (EPA 1999a)

Heavy-Duty Engine and Diesel-Fuel Standards (EPA 2000a)

Year in which benefits evaluated (justification)

2010 (anticipated date when standards will be implemented)

2030 (anticipated date when fleet will be fully turned over)

2030 (anticipated date when fleet will be fully turned over)

Scenarios

Evaluated partial and full attainment of standards for three PM and ozone alternatives

Evaluated conditions with and without the standards being proposed

Evaluated conditions with and without the standards being proposed

Pollutants modeled and methods used for air-quality modeling for benefits analysis

Ozone – quadratic air-quality rollback procedures (partial and full attainment scenarios) based primarily on regional oxidant model and monitoring data

PM – source-receptor matrix based on climatological regional dispersion model (partial-attainment scenario); proportional rollback procedure (full-attainment scenario)

Ozone – regional-scale version of the urban airshed model

PM – source-receptor matrix based on the climatological regional dispersion model

Ozone – regional-scale version of the urban airshed model-variable grid (note: modeling results for western U.S. not used in benefits analysis)

PM – national-scale version of the regulatory modeling system for aerosols and deposition

Geographic scale of models used to estimate air quality

Ozone – 18-km grid squares or county level (size varies)

PM – county level (size varies)

Ozone – 12 or 36-km grid squares for eastern U.S. and 56-km grid squares for western U.S.

PM – county level (size varies)

Ozone – 12 or 36-km grid squares for eastern U.S. (note: western U.S. not included in analysis)

PM – 36-km grid squares



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement