Epilog

The breadth of AMO science and its impact have made the discipline attractive to a large number of support agencies. Support comes mainly from the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Additional support is realized through active research programs at federal and industrial laboratories.

AMO science is dominated by the work of single investigators and small groups. This mode of operation, often called “small science”— in contrast to large-scale science such as experimental high-energy physics and space-based science—has fostered the creativity and innovation that produce notable discoveries year after year. Students trained in AMO science graduate with a vast range of skills and capabilities, making them valuable contributors to our economy. The vitality of AMO science as a fundamental science as well as a fertile training ground has contributed to the recent birth and expansion of AMO programs in academic institutions across the United States.

We continue to be dazzled by the progress of technology and its huge impact on the economy, health, environment, national security, and homeland defense. It is not possible to fathom the wonderful new ideas that will invariably arise from the basic research currently under way. But more important than the tangible aspects of the progress brought about by discoveries and inventions is the pioneering spirit enkindled by scientific exploration. This pioneering spirit is the key to our nation’s continuing security, health, and economic success.



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OCR for page 43
Atoms, Molecules, and Light: AMO Science Enabling the Future Epilog The breadth of AMO science and its impact have made the discipline attractive to a large number of support agencies. Support comes mainly from the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Additional support is realized through active research programs at federal and industrial laboratories. AMO science is dominated by the work of single investigators and small groups. This mode of operation, often called “small science”— in contrast to large-scale science such as experimental high-energy physics and space-based science—has fostered the creativity and innovation that produce notable discoveries year after year. Students trained in AMO science graduate with a vast range of skills and capabilities, making them valuable contributors to our economy. The vitality of AMO science as a fundamental science as well as a fertile training ground has contributed to the recent birth and expansion of AMO programs in academic institutions across the United States. We continue to be dazzled by the progress of technology and its huge impact on the economy, health, environment, national security, and homeland defense. It is not possible to fathom the wonderful new ideas that will invariably arise from the basic research currently under way. But more important than the tangible aspects of the progress brought about by discoveries and inventions is the pioneering spirit enkindled by scientific exploration. This pioneering spirit is the key to our nation’s continuing security, health, and economic success.

OCR for page 43
Atoms, Molecules, and Light: AMO Science Enabling the Future IMAGE CREDITS (in order of appearance) Cover: Courtesy of National Institute of Standards and Technology (photographer: M. Helfer) Inside cover: Courtesy of W. Ketterle, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; I. Bloch, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and T.W. Hänsch, Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik; M. Kasevich,Yale University; and W.D. Phillips, National Institute of Standards and Technology p. viii left Courtesy of Columbia University p. viii right Courtesy of Volvo Car Corporation p. 2 Courtesy of FreeFoto.com p. 2 Courtesy of Intel Corporation p. 2 Courtesy of GE Medical Systems p. 3 Courtesy of Alan Gough,Vision Masters Multimedia p. 4 Courtesy of Synrad Corporation p. 4 Courtesy of J. Owers-Bradley, University of Nottingham p. 4 Courtesy of National Aeronautics and Space Administration p. 4 Courtesy of Air Force Research Laboratory p. 5 Courtesy of H.J. Kimble, California Institute of Technology p. 6 Courtesy of Synrad Corporation Figure 1 Reprinted, by permission, from Nature 406, p. 353 (2000), © 2000 Macmillan Magazines Ltd. p. 8 (box) Courtesy of Lucent Technologies p. 9 (box) Courtesy of Vitaliy V. Losev, NT-MDT Corporation Figure 2 Courtesy of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Figure 3 Courtesy of National Aeronautics and Space Administration Figure 4 Courtesy of Jimmy K. Chin, Photographer p. 12 Courtesy of J. Owers-Bradley, University of Nottingham p. 14 (box) Courtesy of IBM Corporation Figure 5 Courtesy of TLC Vision Corporation Figure 6 Courtesy of B.E. Bouma, Harvard University p. 18 (box) Courtesy of Air Force Research Laboratory Figure 7 Courtesy of W.E. Moerner, Stanford University p. 20 Courtesy of National Aeronautics and Space Administration p. 21 (box) Courtesy of K. Kirby, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Figure 8 Courtesy of U.S. Global Change Research Program Figure 9 Courtesy of National Aeronautics and Space Administration p. 25 (box) Courtesy of W. Cottingame, Los Alamos National Laboratory p. 26 (box) Courtesy of L.R. Narasimhan, University of California, Los Angeles Figure 10 Courtesy of National Aeronautics and Space Administration p. 27 (box) Courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories Figure 11 Courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories p. 28 Courtesy of Air Force Research Laboratory p. 30 (box) Courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Figure 12 Courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Figure 13 Courtesy of TRW, Inc. p. 34 Courtesy of H.J. Kimble, California Institute of Technology Figure 14 Courtesy of Department of Special Collections, Stanford University Libraries Figure 15 © Harold & Esther Edgerton Foundation, 2002, reprinted courtesy of Palm Press, Inc. p. 38 Courtesy of the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Figure 16 Courtesy of the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester Figure 17 Courtesy of National Institute of Standards and Technology Figure 18 Courtesy of National Aeronautics and Space Administration Figure 19 Courtesy of P. Meystre, University of Arizona Figure 20 Photo by Paul Kwiat and Michael Reck. © Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Vienna