B Committee Member and Staff Biographies

RICHARD G. LUTHY, Chair, is the Silas H. Palmer Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University. He received his Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of California at Berkeley and was on the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University, where he was the Thomas Lord Professor of Environmental Engineering and former head of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. His research interests include physicochemical and microbial processes and applied aquatic chemistry with application to waste treatment and remediation of contaminated soil and sediment. He is noted for work on phase partitioning and the treatment and fate of hydrophobic organic compounds. Dr. Luthy chairs the NRC’s Water Science and Technology Board and was a member of the NRC Committee on Innovative Remediation Technologies and the Committee on Intrinsic Remediation. He is a registered professional engineer, a diplomat of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

RICHELLE M. ALLEN-KING is a professor in the Department of Geology at Washington State University. She received a B.A. in chemistry from the University of California, San Diego, and a Ph.D. in earth sciences (hydrogeology) from the University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. Her research focuses on organic pollutants in the hydrologic cycle. She has particular expertise in studying the biogeochemical processes affecting pollutant fate and transport in groundwater. Dr. Allen-King is currently a member of the NRC’s Water Science and Technology Board and the Science Advisory Board for the Washington State Department of Ecology’s Toxic Cleanup Program.



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Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soils and Sediments: Processes, Tools, and Applications B Committee Member and Staff Biographies RICHARD G. LUTHY, Chair, is the Silas H. Palmer Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University. He received his Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of California at Berkeley and was on the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University, where he was the Thomas Lord Professor of Environmental Engineering and former head of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. His research interests include physicochemical and microbial processes and applied aquatic chemistry with application to waste treatment and remediation of contaminated soil and sediment. He is noted for work on phase partitioning and the treatment and fate of hydrophobic organic compounds. Dr. Luthy chairs the NRC’s Water Science and Technology Board and was a member of the NRC Committee on Innovative Remediation Technologies and the Committee on Intrinsic Remediation. He is a registered professional engineer, a diplomat of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. RICHELLE M. ALLEN-KING is a professor in the Department of Geology at Washington State University. She received a B.A. in chemistry from the University of California, San Diego, and a Ph.D. in earth sciences (hydrogeology) from the University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. Her research focuses on organic pollutants in the hydrologic cycle. She has particular expertise in studying the biogeochemical processes affecting pollutant fate and transport in groundwater. Dr. Allen-King is currently a member of the NRC’s Water Science and Technology Board and the Science Advisory Board for the Washington State Department of Ecology’s Toxic Cleanup Program.

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Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soils and Sediments: Processes, Tools, and Applications SALLY L. BROWN is a research assistant professor in the College of Forest Resources, University of Washington. Prior to her appointment, she was a post-doctoral associate in the USDA Agricultural Research Service’s Environmental Chemistry Laboratory in Beltsville, Maryland. Her research interests include the co-utilization of residuals to alleviate metal toxicity in soils and the restoration of metal-affected ecosystems; in situ remediation of lead-contaminated soils using a range of soil amendments; and identification of the mechanisms by which residuals reduce the phytoavailability of soil metals. Dr. Brown has been the project leader for a number of research and demonstration programs at highly metal-contaminated sites in the United States. She received her B.A. in political science from Williams College and her M.S. and Ph.D. in agronomy from the University of Maryland, College Park. DAVID A. DZOMBAK is a professor of environmental engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He specializes in aquatic chemistry, especially interactions of aqueous chemical species with mineral surfaces; fate and transport of chemicals in surface and subsurface waters; water and wastewater treatment; in situ and ex situ soil treatment; and hazardous waste site remediation. Prior to 1989 Dr.Dzombak was a consulting engineer with Paul C. Rizzo Associates, Inc., where he conducted engineering investigation, analysis, and design related to remediation of uncontrolled waste disposal sites and development of new waste disposal facilities. He holds a Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and M.S. and B.S. degrees in civil engineering from Carnegie Mellon University. Dr. Dzombak is a diplomat of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers, and from 1996–1999 served as board member and treasurer of the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors. SCOTT E. FENDORF is an assistant professor of soil and environmental chemistry in the Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences at Stanford University. His research focuses on understanding the movement of inorganic contaminants through soils and their impact on plants and animals. Dr. Fendorf studies the chemistry of the interactions of inorganic contaminants with water and mineral surfaces using spectroscopic techniques in idealized systems and with experiments in real soils systems. He received his B.S. in soil science from the California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, his M.S. in soil chemistry from the University of California, Davis, and his Ph.D. in soil and environmental chemistry from the University of Delaware. JOHN P. GIESY is a professor of zoology in the College of Natural Sciences at Michigan State University. A former president of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, his primary research focus is on the fate and effects of trace contaminants, including metals, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides,

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Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soils and Sediments: Processes, Tools, and Applications and industrial chemicals, in aquatic systems and wildlife populations. He studies accumulation by and effects of these classes of compounds on fish, birds, and mammals, considering the biochemical mechanism of action and population, community, and ecosystem-level effects. Dr. Giesy received his Ph.D. in limnology from Michigan State University. He has recently served on the NRC Committee on Risk-Based Criteria for Non-RCRA Hazardous Waste and the Committee on Remediation of PCB-Contaminated Sediments. JOSEPH B. HUGHES is an associate professor and chair of the Department of Environmental Engineering at Rice University. Professor Hughes’ research focuses on the ability of bacteria and plants to metabolize hazardous organic chemicals. In particular, his work addresses metabolic pathways and their control, interactions of physiochemical processes and biodegradation processes, and how to modify and enrich metabolic processes in situ. He has chaired numerous conference sessions dedicated to contaminant bioavailability, bioremediation, and natural attenuation and is a principal investigator of contaminant bioavailability in the anaerobic subsurface. Dr. Hughes received his B.A. in chemistry from Cornell College and his M.S. and Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from the University of Iowa. SAMUEL N. LUOMA is a senior research hydrologist in the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey, where he has worked since 1976. Dr. Luoma’s research centers on sediment processes, both natural and human-induced, particularly in the San Francisco Bay area. Since 1992, he has published extensively on the bioavailability of metals to aquatic organisms, with emphasis on sediments. He has also helped refine approaches to determine the toxicity of marine and estuarine sediments. In 1999, he was invited to discuss how chemical speciation influences metal bioavailability in sediments for the European Science Foundation. He has served multiple times on the EPA’s Science Advisory Board Subcommittee on Sediment Quality Criteria. Dr. Luoma received his M.S. in zoology from Montana State University, Bozeman, and his Ph.D. in marine biology from the University of Hawaii, Honolulu. LINDA A. MALONE is the Marshall-Wythe Foundation Professor of Law at the College of William and Mary, where she has worked since 1988. Prior to that she taught law at the University of Arkansas School of Law. During her career, she has clerked for Judge Wilbur F. Pell, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, and practiced law at Alston, Miller & Gaines in Atlanta and at Ross, Hardies, O’Keefe, Babcock & Parsons in Chicago. Ms. Malone is the author of numerous publications, including a treatise called Environmental Regulation of Land Use, and a casebook, Environmental Law. She was also the associate editor of the Yearbook of International Environmental Law and a member of the Advisory Board of the National Enforcement Training Institute of EPA. She received

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Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soils and Sediments: Processes, Tools, and Applications her B.A. from Vassar College, her J.D. from Duke University, and her L.L.M. from the University of Illinois. CHARLES A. MENZIE is principal at Menzie-Cura & Associates, Inc. He is responsible for providing environmental and risk assessment services related to soil, sediment, surface water and groundwater contamination, industrial and municipal discharges, hazardous waste sites, and RCRA and Right-to-Know Law compliance. Dr. Menzie has been involved in evaluating how bioavailability information can be used to refine exposures to both human and ecological receptors. He served as chair of the New England Workgroup concerning how to incorporate bioavailability information into risk-based approaches, and he is the co-chair of a group evaluating how bioavailability might influence and modify the ecological Soil Screening Levels. He has also directed an investigation of the comparative anatomy and physiology of vertebrate digestive systems as these may influence bioavailability. Dr. Menzie received his B.S. in biology from Manhattan College, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in biology from the City University of New York. STEPHEN M. ROBERTS is the director of the Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology at the University of Florida and is a professor with joint appointments in the Department of Physiological Sciences in the College of Veterinary Medicine and the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics in the College of Medicine. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Utah College of Medicine. He has previously served on the faculties of the College of Pharmacy at the University of Cincinnati and the College of Medicine at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Dr. Roberts has an active research program to examine mechanisms of chemical toxicity, primarily involving the liver and immune system. He has also studied the bioavailability from soil of multiple chemical types (both metals and organics) following multiple exposure pathways (dermal, inhalation, and direct ingestion). He served as chair of the Florida Risk-Based Priority Council and currently provides advice to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection on issues pertaining to toxicology and risk assessment. MICHAEL V. RUBY is an environmental chemist at Exponent who specializes in evaluating the transport and fate of toxic pollutants and the availability of these compounds to both human and ecological receptors. He has more than 12 years of experience in designing and managing studies of source determination, exposure pathway evaluation, and bioavailability of organic and inorganic contaminants at a variety of historical and operating industrial facilities. Mr. Ruby has directed multidisciplinary projects, with emphasis on soil, sediment, and water quality issues, driven by human health and ecological risk assessment concerns. He has developed risk assessments, feasibility studies, and remedial strategies for sites affected by inorganic and organic contamination of surface water, groundwater,

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Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soils and Sediments: Processes, Tools, and Applications soil, air, and sediments. He received his B.A. in chemistry from the University of California, San Diego, and his M.S. in physical chemistry at Stanford University. TERRY W. SCHULTZ is a professor of environmental toxicology in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Tennessee. He also holds appointments in the Department of Animal Science and Department of Comparative Medicine and the University’s Center for Environmental Biotechnology. Dr. Schultz’s research is centered on the elucidation of cellular mechanisms of acute toxicity; the development of rapid and inexpensive assays for the evaluation of environmental toxicity; the development of structure-activity models for predicting toxic potency and advancing the basic understanding of toxicology; and use of bacterial bioluminescent assays, protozoan population growth inhibition assays, and yeast recombinant systems for endocrine disruption. His current research involves bacterial, protozoan, algal, daphnid, and fish endpoints. He received his B.S. from Austin Peay State University, his M.S. from the University of Arkansas and his Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee. BARTH F. SMETS is an associate professor of environmental engineering at the University of Connecticut, Storrs. He also holds a joint appointment in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology. His research is in the area of environmental biotechnology and biodegradation of organic and xenobiotic compounds including nitroglycerin, nitrotoluenes, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. He is particularly interested in understanding how microbial populations and communities encountered in engineered or natural systems function and change under continuous or occasional exposure to environmental stress. Dr. Smets received his M.S. in applied biological sciences/biotechnology, State University of Ghent, Belgium, and his Ph.D. in environmental engineering and science from the University of Illinois. In 1999, he received the Outstanding Junior Faculty Award in the University of Connecticut’s School of Engineering. LAURA J. EHLERS is a senior staff officer for the Water Science and Technology Board of the National Research Council. Since joining the NRC in 1997, she has served as study director for nine committees, including the Committee to Review the New York City Watershed Management Strategy, the Committee on Riparian Zone Functioning and Strategies for Management, and the Committee on Assessing the TMDL Approach to Water Quality Management. She received her B.S. from the California Institute of Technology, majoring in biology and engineering and applied science. She earned both an M.S.E. and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering at the Johns Hopkins University.