Immediate Appointment of HPCCI Advisory Committee

Recommendation 2: The committee encourages the immediate appointment of the congressionally mandated Advisory Committee intended to provide broad-based, active input to the HPCCI. The HPCCI could be improved by input from and review by an Advisory Committee with balanced representation from industry, academia, and government, especially current and potential users of high-performance computing and communications. If appointment of such a committee is not feasible, some alternate mechanism should soon be developed to provide similar input.

NOTES

1. Committee on Physical, Mathematical, and Engineering Sciences; Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering, and Technology; Office of Science and Technology Policy. 1993. High Performance Computing & Communications: Toward a National Information Infrastructure, 1994. Washington, D.C.: Office of Science and Technology Policy, p. 1.

2. Each year the director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy submits a report on the HPCCI to accompany the president’s budget. It describes prior accomplishments and the funding and activities for the coming fiscal year. These reports have become known as “blue books” after the color of their covers.

3. NSF Blue Ribbon Panel on High Performance Computing. 1993. From Desktop to Teraflop: Exploiting the U.S. Lead in High Performance Computing. Washington, D.C.: National Science Foundation , pp. 1–5. See also Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. 1994. Information Technology in the Service Society: A Twenty-First Century Lever. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

4. Patterson, David A., and John L.Hennessy. 1994. Computer Organization and Design: The Hardware/Software Interface. San Mateo, Calif.: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, p. 21.

5. Computer Science and Technology Board. 1988. Global Trends in Computer Technology and Their Impact on Export Control. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

6. U.S. General Accounting Office, Information Management and Technology Division. 1993. High Performance Computing: Advanced Research Projects Agency Should Do More to Foster Program Goals. Washington, D.C.: U.S. General Accounting Office, pp. 2–5.

7. Congressional Budget Office. 1993. Promoting High-Performance Computing and Communications. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, p. iii and p. 1.

8. Committee on Physical, Mathematical, and Engineering Sciences; Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering, and Technology; Office of Science and Technology Policy. 1991. Grand Challenges: High Performance Computing and Communications: The FY 1992 U.S. Research and Development Program. Washington, D.C.: Office of Science and Technology Policy, p. 24. The agencies that had activities included in the FY 1991 base were the (Defense) Advanced Research Projects Agency, Department of Energy, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation, National Institute of Standards and Technology, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Environmental Protection Agency, and National Institutes of Health/National Library of Medicine.

9. Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. 1994. Realizing the Information Future. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.



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