Appendix A
Biographical Sketches

Philip S. Brachman, M.D. (Chair), is a professor, Department of International Health, Rollins School of Public Health (RSPH), Emory University. He joined the CDC in 1954 and worked in epidemiology and training until his retirement in 1986. He held positions in the Bureau of Epidemiology, and then the Epidemiology Program Office, which he directed from 1970 to 1981. Dr. Brachman also directed the Field Epidemiology Training Program until 1986. He subsequently joined the RSPH faculty and is primarily involved in teaching regular courses in epidemiology, biostatistics, public health surveillance, and infectious diseases in Atlanta, and 2- to 4-week short courses in the same areas in Atlanta, throughout the United States, and overseas. Dr. Brachman’s current research activities include public health surveillance, nosocomial infections, and bioterrorism. He also directs the Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship program at RSPH, a scholarship program financed by the U.S. government for foreign professionals to study and work for one year in the United States.

Adaora Alise Adimora, M.D., M.P.H., is an assistant professor of medicine and clinical assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill. Her work has included efficacy trials of a herpes simplex vaccine, studies of HIV epidemiology in minority populations, and AIDS training in international settings. She also served on the FDA’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee.

Sandra H. Berry, M.A., is a Senior Behavioral Scientist at RAND and the Senior Director of RAND’s Survey Research Group. She has 30 years of experience in survey design, measurement, operational planning, management of policy research projects, field data collection, and survey data analysis, including analysis of methodological studies. Recent work includes co-directing a study of the effect of television on adolescent sexual behavior; the Cost of Cancer Clinical Trials Study; the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study (HCSUS), a study of HIV risks related to sexual behavior; and oversight of instrument design and data collection for HCSUS. She has directed measurement development projects in the area of low vision. She has also directed demographic and health surveys conducted in Indonesia, a community survey for the Los Angeles 2000 Committee, the Medical Outcomes Study data collection, and other health-related research.

Theodore C. Eickhoff, M.D., is Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Disease, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. He has expertise in internal medicine, infectious diseases, and epidemiology. His research interests have included nosocomial infections, the evaluation of new antimicrobial agents, and the prevention and control of influenza. He has long been interested in disease prevention



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Appendix A Biographical Sketches Philip S. Brachman, M.D. (Chair), is a professor, Department of International Health, Rollins School of Public Health (RSPH), Emory University. He joined the CDC in 1954 and worked in epidemiology and training until his retirement in 1986. He held positions in the Bureau of Epidemiology, and then the Epidemiology Program Office, which he directed from 1970 to 1981. Dr. Brachman also directed the Field Epidemiology Training Program until 1986. He subsequently joined the RSPH faculty and is primarily involved in teaching regular courses in epidemiology, biostatistics, public health surveillance, and infectious diseases in Atlanta, and 2- to 4-week short courses in the same areas in Atlanta, throughout the United States, and overseas. Dr. Brachman’s current research activities include public health surveillance, nosocomial infections, and bioterrorism. He also directs the Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship program at RSPH, a scholarship program financed by the U.S. government for foreign professionals to study and work for one year in the United States. Adaora Alise Adimora, M.D., M.P.H., is an assistant professor of medicine and clinical assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill. Her work has included efficacy trials of a herpes simplex vaccine, studies of HIV epidemiology in minority populations, and AIDS training in international settings. She also served on the FDA’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. Sandra H. Berry, M.A., is a Senior Behavioral Scientist at RAND and the Senior Director of RAND’s Survey Research Group. She has 30 years of experience in survey design, measurement, operational planning, management of policy research projects, field data collection, and survey data analysis, including analysis of methodological studies. Recent work includes co-directing a study of the effect of television on adolescent sexual behavior; the Cost of Cancer Clinical Trials Study; the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study (HCSUS), a study of HIV risks related to sexual behavior; and oversight of instrument design and data collection for HCSUS. She has directed measurement development projects in the area of low vision. She has also directed demographic and health surveys conducted in Indonesia, a community survey for the Los Angeles 2000 Committee, the Medical Outcomes Study data collection, and other health-related research. Theodore C. Eickhoff, M.D., is Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Disease, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. He has expertise in internal medicine, infectious diseases, and epidemiology. His research interests have included nosocomial infections, the evaluation of new antimicrobial agents, and the prevention and control of influenza. He has long been interested in disease prevention

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by immunization, and has been an advocate of improved immunization of adults. He has served on the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and the National Vaccine Advisory Committee, and was the first chair of FDA’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. In addition, he has served as president of both the Infectious Disease Society of America and the American Epidemiological Society. Patricia Ferrieri, M.D., is Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology and Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota, and Director of the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory at Fairview-University Medical Center, Minneapolis. She is also a member of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Division. Her research interests include protein antigens of group B streptococci (GBS), pathogenesis of infection, host immunity, and animal models of bacterial infection and protection. In addition, she is involved in molecular characterization/epidemiology of GBS and other bacteria, neonatal infections, and bacterial vaccines. She is a former chairperson of the NIH Bacteriology and Mycology Study Section and the former chair of the FDA Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee, and is knowledgeable in regulatory and licensing procedures. Emil C. Gotschlich, M.D., is vice president for medical sciences at The Rockefeller University, where he is also R. Gwin Follis-Chevron Professor and head of the Laboratory of Bacterial Pathogenesis and Immunology. His early work led to the development of a vaccine for the prevention of group A and C meningococcal meningitis. His research has also been directed at the surface structures responsible for the pathogenicity of group B streptococci and gonococcus. Dr. Gotschlich is a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology and is a member of both the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine. Maurice Hilleman, Ph.D., D.Sc., has been engaged for nearly six decades in basic and applied research in academia, government, and industry. He was formerly director and senior vice president, Merck Institute of Therapeutic Research. He is presently director of the recently formed Merck Institute for Vaccinology. As a virologist-infectious disease scientist, Dr. Hilleman has been engaged in broad-spectrum programs in basic research discovery in virology and viral immunology and in targeted research, which has yielded a large number of vaccines, including measles, mumps, rubella, varicella and combined MMR, pneumococcus, meningococcus, H. influenzae, hepatitis A, and hepatitis B that are now used routinely. His most recent work has focused on vaccine development, improvement, and application, with emphasis on public health policy and worldwide utilization. He engages in summary simplification of the molecular biology, pathogenesis, epidemiology, and immune prophylaxis of a number of viral infections. Other interests include AIDS, hepatitis, virus in cancer, immunology, vaccinology, public policy, and world health applications. Dr. Hilleman serves on the Committee to Review Research Proposals from Former Soviet Biological Weapons Institutes for the National Research Council Office of International Affairs and the U.S. Civilian Research and Development Foundation (CRDF), and is an elected member of both the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine. Dennis L. Kasper, M.D., is executive dean for academic programs, William Ellery Channing Professor of Medicine, and professor of microbiology and molecular genetics at Harvard Medical School. He also serves as director of the Channing Laboratory and as a senior physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. With his colleagues and students, Dr. Kasper studies the molecular basis of bacterial pathogenesis, applying the resulting knowledge to enhance understanding of the interactions of bacterial surface virulence factors with host defenses. Dr. Kasper’s studies focus on the molecular and chemical characterization of important bacterial virulence factors such as capsular polysaccharides, surface proteins, and toxins. The ultimate goal is to develop vaccines and immunomodulatory molecules to prevent bacterial infections

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and their complications. Dr. Kasper is a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, as well as a member of the Institute of Medicine. Michael D. Lockshin, M.D., is director of the Barbara Volcker Center for Women and Rheumatic Disease and co-director of the Mary Kirkland Center for Lupus Research at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City, and Professor of Medicine and Obstetrics-Gynecology at the Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University. His research interests include pregnancy and rheumatic disease, antiphospholipid antibody, and other topics related to systemic lupus erythematosus and sex differences in disease. He convened the first international Conference on Pregnancy and Rheumatic Disease and the first Conference on Gender, Biology, and Human Disease. He has served on editorial boards of numerous scientific journals and has authored more than 190 scientific papers and textbook chapters, including the health policy book, Guarded Prognosis. Prior to his current position, Dr. Lockshin was extramural director, then acting director of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases at the National Institutes of Health. He was then senior advisor to the Director of the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, before returning to Cornell in 1997. Dr. Lockshin chaired the American Board of Internal Medicine Committee on Rheumatology and has chaired many committees and held national offices with the Arthritis Foundation and the American College of Rheumatology. David Madigan, Ph.D., is professor of statistics at Rutgers University. Previously he was a faculty member at the University of Washington and at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, both in Seattle. His work focuses on predictive modeling for large-scale multivariate data, and he has published extensively in that area. He also has research interests in clinical trials and in computational biology. He is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association. Kathleen M. Neuzil, M.D., M.P.H., is an assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Washington School of Medicine, and a staff physician and hospital epidemiologist at the VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington. Her work has included efficacy trials of influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and varicella vaccines, as well as epidemiologic investigations of influenza and respiratory syncytial virus disease burden. Dr. Neuzil currently serves as the American College of Physicians/American Society of Internal Medicine (ACP/ASIM) liaison representative to the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, and is a member of the ACP/ASIM National Task Force on Adult Immunization. N. Regina Rabinovich, M.D., M.P.H., is director, Malaria Vaccine Initiative, at the Program for Appropriate Technology in Health (PATH). Previously, she served as Chief of the Clinical and Regulatory Affairs Branch and the Clinical Studies Section of the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health. Dr. Rabinovich currently serves on the IOM Committee on a Strategy for Minimizing the Impact of Naturally Occurring Infectious Diseases of Military Importance: Vaccine Issues in the U.S. Military. In the past she served as the NIH liaison to the Centers for Disease Control Committee on Immunization Practices and the chair of the Epidemiology Section of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Brian L. Strom, M.D., M.P.H., is professor of biostatistics and epidemiology, professor of medicine, professor of pharmacology, director of the Center for Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, and chair of the Graduate Group in Epidemiology & Biostatistics at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. His clinical training and research training are in internal medicine, clinical pharmacology, and epidemiology, with a major research interest in the field of pharmacoepidemiology. He holds editorial positions on numerous journals and has authored more than 300 original papers, as well as one of the first textbooks in the field. Dr. Strom has served as president of the International Society of Pharmacoepide-

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miology and as a member of the Board of Regents of the American College of Physicians. He is now on the Board of Directors for the American College of Epidemiology. He served on both the Medication Use Task Force of the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations and the Drug Utilization Review Advisory Committee on the United States Pharmacopoeia Convention. He has been elected to the Association of American Physicians, the American Epidemiologic Society, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and the Institute of Medicine. Hugh H. Tilson M.D., Dr.P.H., is clinical professor of epidemiology and health policy and senior adviser to the dean at the University of North Carolina School of Public Health. Dr. Tilson is a practicing epidemiologist and outcomes researcher, with a career in preventive medicine and public health that spans more than 30 years and that includes service as a director of both state and local health departments and as vice president for worldwide epidemiology, surveillance, and policy research at GlaxoWellcome. He is the author of more than 100 papers in epidemiology, outcomes and policy research, and public health. He is a fellow of the American College of Epidemiology and is former vice-chair of the American Board of Preventive Medicine. Dr. Tilson also served as president of the American College of Preventive Medicine from 1995 to 1997 and was founding co-president of the International Society for Pharmacoepidemiology. He serves as an adviser and consultant in health outcomes, drug safety, and evidence-based health policy to regulatory and government agencies as well as pharmaceutical companies.