APPENDIX E
About the Authors

Peter B. Bloland, an epidemiologist, is chief of the Case Management Activity in the Malaria Epidemiology Branch, Division of Parasitic Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia. He received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine and Masters in Preventive Veterinary Medicine degrees from the University of California at Davis. He is a member of the Roll Back Malaria Technical Resource Network on Malaria Control in Complex Emergencies. His refugee field experience includes Zaire, Eritrea, and Tanzania. He has published papers in Lancet and Refuge regarding complex emergencies, in Caring for Those in Crisis: Integrating Anthropology and Public Health in Complex Humanitarian Emergencies (2001, the National Association for Practicing Anthropologists [NAPA] Bulletin 21), and is a contributing author to an interagency handbook on malaria control in the context of complex emergencies, being published by UNCHR and WHO. His current research interests in regard to complex emergencies include general malaria control and prevention and antimalarial drug resistance.

Holly Ann Williams is an anthropologist assigned to the Case Management Activity within the Malaria Epidemiology Branch, Division of Parasitic Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia. She received her Ph.D. in medical and cultural anthropology from the University of Florida and has a clinical specialty in pediatric nursing, with a Masters in Nursing degree from the University of Washington.



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Malaria Control During Mass Population Movements and Natural Disasters APPENDIX E About the Authors Peter B. Bloland, an epidemiologist, is chief of the Case Management Activity in the Malaria Epidemiology Branch, Division of Parasitic Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia. He received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine and Masters in Preventive Veterinary Medicine degrees from the University of California at Davis. He is a member of the Roll Back Malaria Technical Resource Network on Malaria Control in Complex Emergencies. His refugee field experience includes Zaire, Eritrea, and Tanzania. He has published papers in Lancet and Refuge regarding complex emergencies, in Caring for Those in Crisis: Integrating Anthropology and Public Health in Complex Humanitarian Emergencies (2001, the National Association for Practicing Anthropologists [NAPA] Bulletin 21), and is a contributing author to an interagency handbook on malaria control in the context of complex emergencies, being published by UNCHR and WHO. His current research interests in regard to complex emergencies include general malaria control and prevention and antimalarial drug resistance. Holly Ann Williams is an anthropologist assigned to the Case Management Activity within the Malaria Epidemiology Branch, Division of Parasitic Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia. She received her Ph.D. in medical and cultural anthropology from the University of Florida and has a clinical specialty in pediatric nursing, with a Masters in Nursing degree from the University of Washington.

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Malaria Control During Mass Population Movements and Natural Disasters During 1988, she was a study fellow in the Refugee Studies Programme at Oxford University, England. She is a member of the American Anthropological Association’s Committee on Refugee and Immigrants (CORI). She has public health, clinical, and research experience in Thailand, Sudan, Tanzania, and Zambia, working with refugees in camps, self-settled refugees and internally displaced persons. She is also a member of the Roll Back Malaria Technical Resource Network on Malaria Control in Complex Emergencies and is a contributing author to an interagency handbook on malaria control in the context of complex emergencies, being published by UNCHR and WHO. She has authored or coauthored papers relating to refugee studies in the journals Human Organization, and Refuge, as well as the edited volume Selected Papers on Refugee Issues: Volume II (American Anthropology Association). In addition, she served as editor for Caring for Those in Crisis: Integrating Anthropology and Public Health in Complex Humanitarian Emergencies (2001, the National Association for Practicing Anthropologists [NAPA] Bulletin 21). Currently, her research interests include malaria control in complex emergencies, the formulation and implementation of national antimalarial drug treatment policies, and socio-behavioral issues related to malaria control.

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Malaria Control During Mass Population Movements and Natural Disasters The Committee on Population was established by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 1983 to bring the knowledge and methods of the population sciences to bear on major issues of science and public policy. The committee’s work includes both basic studies of fertility, health and mortality, and migration; and applied studies aimed at improving programs for the public health and welfare in the United States and in developing countries. The committee also fosters communication among researchers in different disciplines and countries and policy makers in government and international agencies. The Roundtable on the Demography of Forced Migration was established by the Committee on Population of the National Academy of Sciences in 1999. The Roundtable’s purpose is to serve as an interdisciplinary, nonpartisan focal point for taking stock of what is known about demographic patterns in refugee situations, applying this knowledge base to assist both policy makers and relief workers, and stimulating new directions for innovation and scientific inquiry in this growing field of study. The Roundtable meets yearly and has also organized a series of workshops (held concurrently with Roundtable meetings) on some of the specific aspects of the demography of refugee and refugee-like situations, including mortality patterns, demographic assessment techniques, and research ethics in complex humanitarian emergencies. The Roundtable is composed of experts from academia, government, philanthrophy, and international organizations. Other Publications of the Roundtable on the Demography of Forced Migration Research Ethics in Complex Humanitarian Emergencies: Summary of a Workshop (2002) Demographic Assessment Techniques in Complex Humanitarian Emergencies: Summary of a Workshop (2002) Forced Migration and Mortality (2001)