Appendix A
Committee on Smithsonian Scientific Research: Biographical Sketches

Cornelius J. Pings is president emeritus of the Association of American Universities (AAU). He served as president of AAU from 1993 to 1998 and as provost of the University of Southern California from 1981 to 1993. A member of the National Academy of Engineering, Dr. Pings previously served as professor of chemical engineering and chemical physics, vice provost, and dean of graduate studies at California Institute of Technology. He has been elected as a fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineering and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and is the recipient of numerous awards from organizations, including the American Society for Engineering Education. He has served on several National Academies panels; he was chair of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy, cochair of the Fourth Decade Committee, and chair of the Task Group on Institutional Arrangements for Facilitating Research on the International Space Station.

Barbara L. Bedford is a senior research associate at Cornell University. She received her BA from Marquette University in theology, where she was elected to Alpha Sigma Nu, the National Jesuit Honor Society, and her MS and PhD in environmental science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. For 10 years (1980-1990) she was associate director and for a year (1991) director of the Ecosystems Research Center for Excellence at Cornell University. Before assuming her academic positions, she worked with local and state government agencies in wetlands mapping inventory and classification and development of wetlands regulations. She has been recognized twice by Cornell University for excellence in teaching and in



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Appendix A Committee on Smithsonian Scientific Research: Biographical Sketches Cornelius J. Pings is president emeritus of the Association of American Universities (AAU). He served as president of AAU from 1993 to 1998 and as provost of the University of Southern California from 1981 to 1993. A member of the National Academy of Engineering, Dr. Pings previously served as professor of chemical engineering and chemical physics, vice provost, and dean of graduate studies at California Institute of Technology. He has been elected as a fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineering and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and is the recipient of numerous awards from organizations, including the American Society for Engineering Education. He has served on several National Academies panels; he was chair of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy, cochair of the Fourth Decade Committee, and chair of the Task Group on Institutional Arrangements for Facilitating Research on the International Space Station. Barbara L. Bedford is a senior research associate at Cornell University. She received her BA from Marquette University in theology, where she was elected to Alpha Sigma Nu, the National Jesuit Honor Society, and her MS and PhD in environmental science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. For 10 years (1980-1990) she was associate director and for a year (1991) director of the Ecosystems Research Center for Excellence at Cornell University. Before assuming her academic positions, she worked with local and state government agencies in wetlands mapping inventory and classification and development of wetlands regulations. She has been recognized twice by Cornell University for excellence in teaching and in

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2001 received the National Merit Award of the Society of Wetland Scientists for outstanding achievements in wetland science. She has served on numerous national committees, including the Management Advisory Group to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Assistant Administrator for Water, the Wetland Experts Team of the Nature Conservancy, and the Technical Oversight Committee for restoration of the Hole-in-the-Donut in Everglades National Park, for which she served as chair. In 1993-1995, she was a member of the National Research Council Committee on Wetland Characterization, and she has served as a consultant on wetlands to EPA’s Science Advisory Board. Her current research focuses on plant ecology of freshwater wetlands, especially the biogeochemical and hydrologic controls of plant species diversity on local and regional scales. Marc Davis is professor of astronomy and physics at the University of California, Berkeley, where he served as chair of the Astronomy Department in 1988-1992. He received his BS from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his MA and PhD from Princeton University. His research interests include physical cosmology and large-scale velocity fields. He and members of his research group are working on a DEEP shift survey of the distant universe with the Keck telescope and on generation of maps of galactic dust for use in estimation of reddening and cosmic microwave background radiation foregrounds. Dr. Davis has served on several National Academy of Sciences and National Research Council committees including serving two terms as chair of the Committee on Astronomy and Astrophysics. He has also served as a member of the Visiting Committee for the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Hugh W. Ducklow is Glucksman Professor of Marine Science at the College of William and Mary. He received his AB from Harvard College and his AM and PhD from Harvard University. He is studying biological oceanography on marine microbial plankton in habitats ranging from the York River through Chesapeake Bay to the open sea, inland seas, and Antarctic coastal seas. His research focuses on temporal and spatial variations of bacterial biomass, growth dynamics, and organic-matter use. He is active in the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study, where he has been investigating water-column processes in the Chesapeake Bay since 1981. Jonathan Fink is professor and vice president for research and economic affairs at the Arizona State University. He received his BA from Colby College and his PhD from Stanford University. He has served as director of the Petrology and Geochemistry Program at the National Science Foundation and as chair of a National Research Council committee evaluating

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the future of the USGS Volcano Hazards Program. His research is concerned with how that magma intrudes into, erupts through, and flows across the earth’s surface. His other research interests outside volcanology involve the application of the principles of mechanics to selected problems in tectonics, sedimentology, and planetary geology. Anthony Janetos is a senior research fellow at the H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the Environment. Before joining the center in June 2002, he served as senior vice president and chief of program, at the World Resources Institute from 1999. He had served as senior scientist for the Land-Cover and Land-Use Change Program in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Office of Earth Science and was program scientist for the Landsat 7 mission. Dr. Janetos graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College with a bachelor’s degree in biology and earned a master’s degree and a PhD in biology from Princeton University. He had many years of experience in managing scientific research programs on a variety of ecological and environmental topics, including air-pollution effects on forests, climate-change effects, land-use change, ecosystem modeling, and the global carbon cycle. He was a cochair of the US National Assessment of the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change and an author of the Global Biodiversity Report and of the IPCC Special Report on Land-Use Change and Forestry. Kenneth I. Kellermann is chief scientist at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and a research professor at the University of Virginia. He received an SB in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a PhD in Physics and Astronomy from California Institute of Technology. He has served as the assistant director at NRAO and director at the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany. He is a former chair of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Astronomy Section, the US National Committee for the International Astronomical Union, and the Radio Astronomy Panel of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey Committee and has served on other National Research Council committees, boards, and commissions and on the NAS Council. His research interests include radio galaxies, quasars and cosmology, and the development of new instrumentation for radio astronomy. J. Patrick Kociolek is curator and G. Dallas Hanna Chair in Diatom Studies at the California Academy of Sciences. He served as the director of research in 1993-1997 and has served as executive director since 1998. He received his BS from St. Mary’s College of Maryland, his MS from Bowling Green State University, and his PhD from the University of Michigan.

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His research focuses on the taxonomy, ultrastructure, systematics, and phylogeny of the diatoms and on how historical events have determined their distributions over space and time. He is describing the diversity and morphology of the large genus Gomphonema (1000+ taxa) and the biogeography and evolutionary relationships of Actinella taxa and their allies in the rhaphidioid lineage. As part of his curatorial duties, he is involved in the development of information-management systems that organize and disseminate information on diatom biogeography, nomenclature, and literature. He is also interested in applying results of his studies on diatoms to broader questions of pattern and process in evolutionary biology. Daniel Livingstone is James B. Duke Professor of Biology and Earth and Ocean Science at Duke University. He received his BSc and MSc from Dalhousie University, Canada, and his PhD from Yale University. He works at the interface of zoology, botany, and geology. He has published papers on chemical embryology, paleontology, fish zoogeography, kinetics of phosphorus cycling, orientation of thaw lakes, management of trout populations, paleolimnology, theory of ice ages, chemical composition of lakes and rivers, folklore, crocodile behavior, geochemical cycles, interactions of climate and human culture, coring technology, and pollen analysis, especially of Alaska, Nova Scotia, and tropical Africa. He is the recipient of the 1989 G. E. Hutchinson Medal of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography. Michael J. Novacek is senior vice president, provost of science, and curator at the American Museum of Natural History. He received his PhD in paleontology from the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on the higher-level phylogeny of the mammals with emphasis on the radiation of the modern groups of mammals, the placentals, including primates and a great diversity of other major groups. Developing theories largely from paleontological and morphological databases, he has reviewed, analyzed, or incorporated new data from gene sequences. He is part of collaborative efforts to summarize a wide variety of morphological and molecular data to develop a better map of mammal evolution. Bruce A. Rideout serves the Zoological Society of San Diego as head of the Pathology Division at the Center for Reproduction of Endangered Species. He joined the society in 1991 as an associate pathologist and was named head of the division in 1996. He is also a charter member of the Endangered Species Recovery Council and research associate of the Peregrine Fund. He received an undergraduate degree in chemistry from the University of California, San Diego, and his doctorate in veterinary medi-

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cine degree in 1986 from the University of California, Davis. After completing pathology residency training at the National Zoological Park in Washington, DC, he returned to the University of California, Davis, where he received a PhD studying the effects of retroviruses on the immune system. He is board-certified in veterinary pathology. His primary interests include pathogenesis and epidemiology of infectious diseases, avian embryonic and neonatal pathology as related to captive propagation for recovery programs, population dynamics of infectious disease, and disease risk assessment for translocation and reintroduction programs. Ethan Schreier is vice president of advanced projects at Associated Universities, Inc. while on leave from the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore. He is a tenured astronomer at STScI and has a PhD in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has worked on numerous space-astronomy projects since the 1970s. As a senior staff member of STScI who helped organize the institute in 1981, he had overall responsibility for all institute activities in operations, observation support, computing, data management, and archiving for its first decade. He has filled the positions of chief data and operations scientist, associate director for operations, associate director for the next-generation space telescope, and head of strategic planning and development. Before joining STScI, he had been a senior scientist at the HarvardSmithsonian Center for Astrophysics from its inception in 1973. His research has included the study of x-ray emission from neutron stars and black holes in binary systems and of jets and massive black holes in active galaxies. He is studying the relation of active galactic nuclei to their host environments and is a member of two large research consortia (“Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey”) gathering multiwavelength survey data from most major observatories. Patricia C. Wright received her PhD in anthropology from the City University of New York in 1985. She is a professor in the Department of Anthropology at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Dr. Wright has served as the executive director of the Institute for the Conservation of Tropical Environments since 1992 and as the international coordinator for the Ranomafana National Park Project in Madagascar since 1987. In 1989, she was chosen as a MacArthur Fellow by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation; and she was awarded the Chevalier d’Ordre National (National Medal of Honor of Madagascar) by the president of Madagascar in 1995. Dr. Wright’s research takes her to South America, Asia, and Madagascar, where she studies the behavior and ecology of nonhuman primates. Specifically, she is interested in monogamy,

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paternal care, and conservation needs, and her research has focused on owl monkeys, titi monkeys, tarsiers, and lemurs. Most recently, she has been continuing a long-term behavioral and demographic study of the Milne-Edwards sifaka (Propithecus diadema edwardsi), which now spans 14 years of continuous research.