TABLE D-1 Federal Support for Schools of Public Health1

Year

Traineeships

Project Grants

Formula Grants

1957

1,000,000

 

 

1960

2,000,000

 

1,000,000

1963

4,000,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1966

7,000,000

4,000,000

3,500,000

1969

8,000,000

4,917,000

4,554,000

1972

8,400,000

4,517,000

5,554,000

1Table from Higher Education for Public Health, p. 164.

cussed the “ferment” in schools of public health around the new, or newly recognized, problems of chronic illness, mental disorder, air pollution, medical care organization, aging, injuries, and radiation hazards. The new federal funds provided some basic operating costs but also encouragement to explore targeted areas of research and training. New schools of public health were created at the University of California, Los Angeles, and in Puerto Rico, and many schools expanded their previously cramped facilities. In 1963, the federal government doubled the ceiling on formula grants and also began offering construction grants to schools of public health.

This was an exciting time for the schools; between 1960 and 1964, the total number of applicants to schools of public health more than doubled; the number of faculty members increased by 50 percent; the average space occupied increased by 50 percent; and the average income of the schools more than doubled.61 New faculty appointments were made in such fields as medical care organization, social and behavioral sciences, public health administration, human ecology, radiation sciences, population studies, and international health.

The newly created Agency for International Development (AID) encouraged schools of public health to develop international health training programs whose students would become “ambassadors of American science” abroad.62 By 1965, the whole country seemed to have become concerned about the “population explosion,” and the United States Congress was voting money to provide technical assistance, often in the form of contraceptives, to the developing world.

The passage of Medicare and Medicaid legislation in 1965 generated

61  

Elizabeth Fee and Barbara Rosenkrantz, “Professional Education for Public Health in the United States,” in Elizabeth Fee and Roy M. Acheson, eds. A History of Education in Public Health: Health that Mocks the Doctors’ Rules. Oxford: Oxford University Press; 1991, 230–271.

62  

Minutes, April 7–8, 1964, Executive Session, Association of Schools of Public Health, pp. 6–7. Alan Mason Chesney Archives of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, RG 1, Box 48.



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