Appendix H
Committee Biographies

Kristine Gebbie, DrPH, RN (co-chair) is Director of the Center for Health Policy and the Doctor of Nursing Science Program, as well as Elizabeth Standish Gill Associate Professor of Nursing at Columbia University. She has conducted extensive research on health policy, public health nurses, and public health laws, and is a recognized expert in the enumeration and development of the public health workforce. Dr. Gebbie is an IOM member with expertise in public health systems and infrastructures, HIV/AIDS prevention policy development, state and local public health practice, and public health nursing. She was elected to the IOM in 1992.

Linda Rosenstock, MD, MPH (co-chair) is currently Dean of the UCLA School of Public Health. She holds academic appointments as professor of medicine in the School of Medicine and professor of environmental health sciences in the School of Public Health. She served as Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) (1994– 2000) and in 2000, Dr. Rosenstock received the Presidential Distinguished Executive Award. She has been active in clinical primary care, internal medicine, and occupational medicine, and also is active internationally in teaching and research in occupational and environmental health, serving as an advisor to the World Health Organization. She was elected to the IOM in 1995.



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Who Will Keep the Public Healthy?: Educating Public Health Professionals for the 21st Century Appendix H Committee Biographies Kristine Gebbie, DrPH, RN (co-chair) is Director of the Center for Health Policy and the Doctor of Nursing Science Program, as well as Elizabeth Standish Gill Associate Professor of Nursing at Columbia University. She has conducted extensive research on health policy, public health nurses, and public health laws, and is a recognized expert in the enumeration and development of the public health workforce. Dr. Gebbie is an IOM member with expertise in public health systems and infrastructures, HIV/AIDS prevention policy development, state and local public health practice, and public health nursing. She was elected to the IOM in 1992. Linda Rosenstock, MD, MPH (co-chair) is currently Dean of the UCLA School of Public Health. She holds academic appointments as professor of medicine in the School of Medicine and professor of environmental health sciences in the School of Public Health. She served as Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) (1994– 2000) and in 2000, Dr. Rosenstock received the Presidential Distinguished Executive Award. She has been active in clinical primary care, internal medicine, and occupational medicine, and also is active internationally in teaching and research in occupational and environmental health, serving as an advisor to the World Health Organization. She was elected to the IOM in 1995.

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Who Will Keep the Public Healthy?: Educating Public Health Professionals for the 21st Century Susan M. Allan, JD, MD, MPH is the Health Director for the Department of Human Services in Arlington County, Virginia. Dr. Allan has extensive experience in planning, development, organization, and direction of public health initiatives. Prior to her promotion to Arlington County Health Director, Dr. Allan was the county’s Medical Supervisor of Public Health Clinics, and the Public Health Physician. She was a scholar in the inaugural year of the Centers for Disease Control’s Public Health Leadership Institute. She has also had medical training in small rural clinics in such developing countries as Colombia. Dr. Allan has presented widely and published in health issues related to immigrants and refugees, local and state roles in public health care services, and leadership and health care. She has been very active in a number of capacities with the National Association of County and City Health Officials and is also the NACCHO representative to the Council on Linkages between Academia and Public Health Practice. Most recently, she served on the Committee on Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2010. Kaye Bender, PhD, RN was appointed Deputy State Health Officer for the Mississippi State Department of Health in October 1998. As Deputy, Dr. Bender is second in command of the statewide public health system. Previous to this position, Dr. Bender served 10 years as the Chief of Staff of the State Health Officer at the Mississippi State Department of Health. Her responsibilities included directing the offices of Policy and Planning, Public Health Nursing, Field Services, Primary Care Development, among others. Over her professional career, Dr. Bender has served in leadership positions as Director of Public Health Nursing, Field Services Nurse Consultant, District V Supervising Nurse, and Maternal-Child Health Nurse Consultant with the Mississippi State Department of Health. Dr. Bender is active in the American Nurses Association, Mississippi Nurses Association, American Public Health Association, and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials Senior Deputies. Dan G. Blazer, III, MD, PhD, MPH is JP Gibbons professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center. During Dr. Blazer’s tenure as Dean of Medical Education at Duke, he expanded a Master of Public Health program for medical school students which now attracts over 20 percent of the medical school class. Dr. Blazer is the author or editor of over 25 books and author or co-author of over 260 peer-reviewed articles on topics including depression, epidemiology, and consultation liaison psychiatry. He is a fellow of the American College of Psychiatry and the American Psychiatric Association with expertise in geriatric psychiatry medical education, religion and medicine, preventive medicine, and public health. He was elected to the IOM in 1995.

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Who Will Keep the Public Healthy?: Educating Public Health Professionals for the 21st Century Scott Burris, JD is on the faculty of the Temple University Beasley School of Law in Philadelphia, and is Associate Director of the Center for Law and the Public’s Health at Georgetown and Johns Hopkins Universities. He was formerly an attorney at the American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania and is a graduate of Yale Law School. He serves on numerous advisory committees on matters relating to public health law and has published extensively on the subject in both health and legal journals. He is the editor of AIDS Law Today: A New Guide for the Public (1993). His research has been supported by grants from funders including the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Open Society Institute, the American Foundation for AIDS Research, and the CDC. Mark Cullen, MD is Professor of Medicine and Public Health and Program Director of the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program at Yale University School of Medicine. His two areas of research focus include occupational asthma and the relationship between socioeconomic status and health, with an emphasis on the role of work organization. Dr. Cullen serves as consultant to several large corporations, unions and non-profit organizations. At the IOM, he has been active on committees relating to manpower, training, and curricula in occupational and environmental medicine; and has been a peer reviewer on publications concerning Agent Orange and the Persian Gulf War. He serves on the IOM Health Sciences Policy Board. Dr. Cullen has published extensively in numerous journals and co-edited two textbooks. He received his MD from Yale. He was elected to the IOM in 1997. Haile Tesfaye Debas, MD is Dean of the School of Medicine and Vice Chancellor for Medical Affairs at the University of California, San Francisco. He is an IOM member and currently serves on the Membership Committee. His expertise is in academic medicine and he has a keen interest in education. He is a gifted teacher who brought the Department of Surgery at UCSF to previously unprecedented national recognition, which is now considered one of the best academic departments of surgery in the country. The recipient of continuous NIH funding, Dean Debas has national recognition as a gastrointestinal investigator and has made numerous original contributions to medicine. Dr. Debas received his MD from McGill University School of Medicine. He was elected to the IOM in 1990. Robert Goodman, PhD, MPH, MA holds an Endowed Professorship in the Department of Community Health Sciences at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. Formerly he was Director of the Center for Community Research at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine and a faculty member at the University of North

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Who Will Keep the Public Healthy?: Educating Public Health Professionals for the 21st Century Carolina and the University of South Carolina Schools of Public Health. Dr. Goodman has written extensively on issues concerning community health development, community coalitions, evaluation methods, organizational development, and the institutionalization of health programs. He has been the principal investigator and evaluator on projects for the CDC, the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Substance Abuse Prevention, the Office on Women’s Health, the Children’s Defense Fund, and several state health departments. Alan Guttmacher, MD is the Deputy Director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) of the National Institutes of Health. In that role, he helps oversee the NHGRI’s efforts in advancing genome research, integrating the benefits of genome research into health care, and exploring the ethical, legal, and social implications of human genomics. He also serves as Director of the NHGRI’s Office of Policy, Planning, and Communications and thus directs the institute’s health affairs, public policy, communications, and public education functions. Dr. Guttmacher formerly was at the University of Vermont, where his roles included directing the Vermont Regional Genetics Center, the Vermont Human Genetics Initiative, the Vermont Cancer Center’s Familial Cancer Program, the Vermont Newborn Screening Program, and the NIH-supported Community Genetics and Ethics Initiative, the nation’s first statewide effort to involve the general public in discussing the Human Genome Project’s ethical, legal and social implications. A graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Medical School, Dr. Guttmacher completed a residency in Pediatrics and a fellowship in Medical Genetics at Children’s Hospital of Boston and Harvard. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics and of the American College of Medical Genetics. Rita Kukafka, DrPH, MA is Assistant Professor, jointly appointed with the Mailman School of Pubic Health (Sociomedical Sciences) and the Department of Medical Informatics, College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University. The focus of her dual appointment is to develop a program of research and training in Public Health Informatics. She holds a Doctorate degree from the School of Public Health at Columbia University and two masters degrees, one in health education, and the second in Medical Informatics from Columbia University, where she also completed a National Library of Medicine awarded postdoctoral fellowship in Medical Informatics. Her research focuses on representing patient perceptions and beliefs for purposes of creating patient-tailored information, computer mediated communications designed to influence changes in health behaviors and provider practices, and how theory from the behavioral

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Who Will Keep the Public Healthy?: Educating Public Health Professionals for the 21st Century sciences can be applied to advance our understanding and to improve our capacity to implement information technology systems into health care organizations. Roxanne Parrott, PhD is a Professor in the Department of Communication Arts & Sciences and Director of the Health Communication Program at Pennsylvania State University. She is currently principal investigator of a CDC-funded grant that examines strategies for communicating genetics information to the lay public and co-investigator for an ELSI grant that examines the ethical and social implications of race-based pharmacogenomic messages. Her previous funded research focused on cancer communications, emphasizing social influence theories and community-based models in health message design and evaluation. She was the co-recipient of a Linkages Award in 1999 from NACCHO and ASTHO in recognition of an innovative national model of collaboration between public health agencies and institutions of higher learning. Dr. Parrott has published extensively, including the award-winning volume cited in the 2010 Chapter on Health Communication, “Designing Health Messages: Approaches from Communication Theory and Public Health Practice,” and “Evaluating Women’s Health Messages: A Resource Book.” Sheila M. Smythe, MS is Executive Vice President of New York Medical College and Dean of the School of Public Health, President of the Partnership for a Healthy Population, and Professor of Health Policy and Economics. Formerly, Ms. Smythe held the position of Chief Health Policy Advisor of the US General Accounting Office, was President and Chief Operating Officer of Empire Blue Cross and Blue Shield in New York, and Assistant Director of Research and Planning for the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. William A. Vega, PhD is Director of the Behavioral and Research Training Institute of University Behavioral HealthCare of the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. He is also a member of the faculty at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey. Formerly, Dr. Vega was Professor of Public Health at the University of California at Berkeley. He was recipient of the 2002 Community, Culture, and Prevention Science Award from the Society for Prevention Research, and the 2002 Award for Excellence in Research from the National Hispanic Science Network (sponsored by the National Institute of Drug Abuse). He received his academic degrees in sociology and criminology from the University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Vega’s expertise is comparative studies of ethnicity and health, with a specialization in immigrant adaptation and behavioral health adjustments that

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Who Will Keep the Public Healthy?: Educating Public Health Professionals for the 21st Century occur among Latino adolescents and adults. He is currently interested in the paradox: “How do impoverished Hispanics achieve superior health profiles compared to native born Hispanics and European Americans?” Patricia W. Wahl, PhD is Dean of the School of Public Health and Community Medicine at the University of Washington in Seattle where she is also Professor of Biostatistics. She previously served as Associate Dean of the School and as Acting Chair of the Department of Pathobiology. Currently, she is a member of the Administrative Committee of the Council on Education in Public Health (CEPH), the accrediting agency for schools of public health and graduate public health programs. In 1999 Dr. Wahl received the American Public Health Association’s Statistics Section Award for outstanding contributions to the field of statistics and public health in administration, research, and training. Dr. Wahl is a member of the IOM Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention.