C Panel Member Bio Sketches

James J. Duderstadt (Chair) is President Emeritus and University Professor of Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan. He also is the Director of the Millennium Project, a research center concerned with the future of higher education. Dr. Duderstadt obtained his B.S. in electrical engineering from Yale and his Ph.D. in engineering science and physics from the California Institute of Technology. He joined the faculty of the University of Michigan in 1968, and served as Dean of the College of Engineering and then Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs before becoming President of the university in 1988. Dr. Duderstadt’s teaching and research interests span a range of subjects in science, mathematics, and engineering, including science policy and higher education. Dr. Duderstadt has received several national awards and has been elected to many honorific societies. He has chaired or served on numerous boards, including the National Science Board, the Executive Council of the National Academy of Engineering, the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy of the National Academy of Sciences, the Big Ten Athletic Conference, Unisys, and CMS Energy.

Daniel E. Atkins earned a B.S. in electrical engineering from Bucknell University in 1965, and an M.S.E.E. and a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, in 1967 and 1970, respectively. Dr. Atkins joined the University of Michigan’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) as an assistant professor in 1972. From January 1989 through July 1990, he served as interim Dean of the College of Engineering. In 1990 Dr. Atkins created an R&D consortium to realize a prototype of a “collaboratory,” a vision around which a large and interdisciplinary group of



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Preparing for the Revolution: Information Technology and the Future of the Research University C Panel Member Bio Sketches James J. Duderstadt (Chair) is President Emeritus and University Professor of Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan. He also is the Director of the Millennium Project, a research center concerned with the future of higher education. Dr. Duderstadt obtained his B.S. in electrical engineering from Yale and his Ph.D. in engineering science and physics from the California Institute of Technology. He joined the faculty of the University of Michigan in 1968, and served as Dean of the College of Engineering and then Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs before becoming President of the university in 1988. Dr. Duderstadt’s teaching and research interests span a range of subjects in science, mathematics, and engineering, including science policy and higher education. Dr. Duderstadt has received several national awards and has been elected to many honorific societies. He has chaired or served on numerous boards, including the National Science Board, the Executive Council of the National Academy of Engineering, the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy of the National Academy of Sciences, the Big Ten Athletic Conference, Unisys, and CMS Energy. Daniel E. Atkins earned a B.S. in electrical engineering from Bucknell University in 1965, and an M.S.E.E. and a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, in 1967 and 1970, respectively. Dr. Atkins joined the University of Michigan’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) as an assistant professor in 1972. From January 1989 through July 1990, he served as interim Dean of the College of Engineering. In 1990 Dr. Atkins created an R&D consortium to realize a prototype of a “collaboratory,” a vision around which a large and interdisciplinary group of

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Preparing for the Revolution: Information Technology and the Future of the Research University faculty and administrators have coalesced their interests. Dr. Atkins became founding Dean of the new School of Information in July 1992 and held that position until September 1998. With major support of the University and the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, Dr. Atkins led the School of Information’s creation of a graduate research and educational program to produce leaders and change agents in the design, use, and evaluation of new knowledge-work environments. Dr. Atkins is currently the Executive Director of the Alliance for Community Technology, a strategic partnership with the W. K. Kellogg Foundation. John Seely Brown is Chief Scientist of the Xerox Corporation. He has been deeply involved at Xerox in expanding the role of corporate research to include organizational learning, ethnographies of the workplace, complex adaptive systems, and techniques for unfreezing the corporate mind. His research interests include digital culture, ubiquitous computing, user-centering design, and organizational and individual learning. Dr. Brown is a cofounder of the Institute for Research on Learning, a member of the National Academy of Education, and a Fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence. He serves on numerous advisory boards and boards of directors. He has also published nearly 100 papers in scientific journals and the books Seeing Differently: Insights on Innovation and The Social Life of Information (with Paul Duguid) (Harvard Business School Press). He was awarded the 1998 Industrial Research Institute Medal for outstanding accomplishments in technological innovation and the 1999 Holland Award in recognition of the best paper in Research Technology Management in 1998. Dr. Brown has a B.S. in Mathematics and Physics from Brown University, and an M.S. in Mathematics and a Ph.D. in Computer and Communication Sciences from the University of Michigan. Marye Anne Fox is Chancellor of North Carolina State University. Previously, she served in numerous capacities at the University of Texas, including Vice President for Research and Director of the Center for Fast Kinetics Research. Dr. Fox has held numerous visiting appointments and has had extensive consulting experience throughout her career. She has also been a board member of many organizations, including the National Science Board; she was chair of the Federal Science and Technology guidance group (1998/1999); and is currently a member

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Preparing for the Revolution: Information Technology and the Future of the Research University of COSEPUP and Co-chair of the Council of the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable. Dr. Fox is known for her contributions to organic photochemistry and photoelectro-chemistry. Her research interests include physical organic chemistry, organic photochemistry, organic electrochemistry, chemical reactivity in non-homogeneous systems, heterogeneous photocatalysis, and electron transfer in anisotropic macro-molecular arrays. Dr. Fox earned her Ph.D. from Dartmouth in 1974. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Ralph E. Gomory has been President of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation since 1989. He was Higgins Lecturer and Assistant Professor at Princeton University from 1957 to 1959. Dr. Gomory joined the Research Division of IBM in 1959, became an IBM Fellow in 1964, and Director of the Mathematical Sciences Department in 1965. He was made IBM Director of Research in 1970, and held that position until 1986, becoming IBM Vice President in 1973 and Senior Vice President in 1985. In 1986, Dr. Gomory became IBM Senior Vice President for Science and Technology. Dr. Gomory served on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology from 1990 to March 1993, and he has served in numerous capacities for many other academic, industrial, and governmental organizations. He is a member both of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Gomory received his B.A. from Williams College in 1950, studied at Cambridge University, and received his Ph.D. in mathematics from Princeton University in 1954. He has also been awarded a number of honorary degrees and prizes, including the National Medal of Science. Dr. Gomory served in the U.S. Navy from 1954 to 1957. Nils Hasselmo is currently the President of the Association of American Universities. Previously, he held numerous positions at the University of Minnesota, including President (1989-1997), Vice President for Administration and Planning (1980-1983), and Chairman of the Department of Scandinavian Languages and Literature and Director of the Center for Northwest European Language and Area Studies (1970-1973). Dr. Hasselmo has also served as Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost at the University of Arizona (1983-1988) and held visiting appointments at the University of Wisconsin (1964-1965), Harvard University (1967), and Umea University in Sweden

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Preparing for the Revolution: Information Technology and the Future of the Research University (1977). Dr. Hasselmo has received numerous fellowships and awards and is a member of a number of professional and educational associations, including the Board of the National Merit Scholarship Corporation, the Council of Big Ten, the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges, the Universities Research Association, and the Kellogg Commission on the Future of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges. Dr. Hasselmo received his baccalaureate from Augustana College and Ph.D. in Linguistics from Harvard University. Paul M. Horn is currently Senior Vice President, Research, of the IBM Corporation, a position he has held since 1996. In his 20 years with IBM, Dr. Horn has been a champion for translating technology research into marketplace opportunities—first, as a solid state physicist, and then followed by several key management positions in science, semiconductors, and storage. Prior to his current appointment, Dr. Horn was Vice President and Lab Director of the Research Division’s Almaden Research Center in San Jose, California. Dr. Horn graduated from Clarkson College of Technology and received his doctoral degree from the University of Rochester in 1973. Prior to joining IBM in 1979, Dr. Horn was a professor in the Physics Department and the James Franck Institute at the University of Chicago. Dr. Horn is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and an NSF Graduate Fellow, and he was an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow from 1974-1978. He is a former Associate Editor of Physical Review Letters and has published some 85 scientific and technical papers. In 1988 he received the Bertram Eugene Warren award from the American Crystallographic Association. Dr. Horn is a member of numerous professional committees, including the Council on Competitiveness, the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable, the Clarkson University Board of Trustees, the UC Berkeley Industrial Advisory Board, and the Board of the New York Hall of Science. Shirley Ann Jackson has served as the 18th President of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute since July 1, 1999. Previously, she was Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. During her tenure with the Commission she enhanced the regulatory effectiveness of the 3,000-employee, $472-million agency. Prior to joining the NRC, she was Professor of Physics at Rutgers University and held research positions at Bell Laboratories, the

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Preparing for the Revolution: Information Technology and the Future of the Research University Fermi National Accelerator Center, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, and the Aspen Center for Physics. She holds a B.S. in physics and a Ph.D. in theoretical elementary-particle physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Frank H.T. Rhodes is Professor of Geological Sciences and President Emeritus at Cornell University. Before assuming the presidency at Cornell in 1977—a position he then held for 18 years—Dr. Rhodes was Vice President for Academic Affairs at the University of Michigan for three years. He joined the Michigan faculty as professor of geology in 1968 and, in 1971, was named Dean of the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. He was professor and head of the geology department and Dean of the Faculty of Science at the University of Wales, and has served on the faculty at the University of Illinois and the University of Durham. Dr. Rhodes received a bachelor of science degree with first-class honors, as well as a doctor of philosophy degree, a doctor of science degree, and a doctor of laws degree from the University of Birmingham, England. He went to the University of Illinois in 1950 as a postdoctoral fellow and Fulbright scholar. Dr. Rhodes was appointed by President Reagan as a member of the National Science Board, of which he is a former chair, and by President George H.W. Bush as a member of the President’s Educational Policy Advisory Committee. He has served as Chair of the American Council on Education, the American Association of Universities, and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. He has also served as a trustee of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Dr. Rhodes has published widely in the fields of geology, paleontology, evolution, the history of science, and education. He is a principal of the Washington Advisory Group, a member of the board of directors of the General Electric Company, and a member of the Board of Overseers of Koç University, Turkey. He is currently president of the American Philosophical Society. Marshall S. Smith is Program Director for Education at the Hewlett Foundation, and Professor of Education at Stanford University. He has been involved in helping to shape the nation’s educational policies, especially as they relate to equal opportunity and high standards. He served as Undersecretary and Acting Deputy Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education from 1993

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Preparing for the Revolution: Information Technology and the Future of the Research University to 2000. In these capacities, he was the Chief Operating Officer of the Department and the Chief Policy Advisor to the Secretary. Originally trained in statistical techniques for research, Dr. Smith has extensive knowledge of policy issues from his years of previous governmental and academic experience. This experience has included research on such topics as computer analysis of social-science data, early-childhood education, critical thinking, and social inequality; teaching positions at Harvard, Wisconsin, and Stanford; and six years as Dean of the School of Education at Stanford. Dr. Smith’s current research interests include national and state educational policy, educational quality, challenging educational standards, imaginative use of technology for learning, and policy and practices in education in emerging nations. He has been a member of several organizations, including the National Academy of Education and the National Council on Education Standards and Testing, and he served as the chair of several committees, including the National Academy of Sciences’ Board of International Comparative Studies in Education and the U.S. Government Subcommittee on Educational Standards. Dr. Smith obtained his baccalaureate, M.A., and Ed.D. in Measurement and Statistics (1970) from Harvard. Lee Sproull holds the Leonard N. Stern School Professorship of Business at the Stern School, New York University. She is currently Director of the Stern School Initiative in Digital Economy, a comprehensive project combining educational programs, research, and industry partnerships. Dr. Sproull is an internationally recognized sociologist whose research centers on the implications of computer-based communication technologies for managers, organizations, communities, and society. She has conducted research on technology-induced changes in inter-personal interaction, group dynamics and decision making, and organizational or community structure. Dr. Sproull has been a Visiting Scholar at Xerox PARC, Digital Cambridge Research Lab, and Lotus Development Corporation, and has published the results of her research in eight books and more than 60 articles. She has held previous appointments as Professor of Management at Boston University and Professor of Social and Decision Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University. She holds a B.A. from Wellesley College, and an M.A. and Ph.D. from Stanford University. Dr. Sproull is a member of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Research

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Preparing for the Revolution: Information Technology and the Future of the Research University Council and the advisory board of MentorNet, and is a former Trustee of the Computer Museum. Doug Van Houweling has been President and CEO of the University Corporation for Advanced Internet Development (UCAID) since October 1997. UCAID is a consortium of U.S. research universities, in collaboration with private- and public-sector partners, currently engaged in the Internet2 project to advance networking technology and applications for the research and education community. He is on leave from the University of Michigan. Dr. Van Houweling has been active in inter-university initiatives, serving on the board of EDUCOM—a consortium of 450 universities that developed computer networks and systems for sharing information and resources—and as a founder of EDUCOM’s Networking and Telecommunications Task Force. He has also served as a board member of the Interuniversity Consortium for Educational Computing. Prior to going to Michigan, Dr. Van Houweling was Vice Provost for Computing and Planning at Carnegie Mellon and Assistant Professor of Government at Cornell. He received his undergraduate degree from Iowa State University and his Ph.D. in government from Indiana University. Robert Weisbuch is President of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. He joined the Foundation after 25 years at the University of Michigan, where he served as Chair of the Department of English, Associate Vice President for Research, and Associate Dean for Faculty Programs and Interim Dean at the Rackham School of Graduate Studies. He is a graduate of Wesleyan University and holds a Ph.D. in English from Yale University. He has received awards both for teaching and scholarship at Michigan, and is the author of books on Emily Dickinson and the stormy relations between British and American authors in the 19th century. While Dean of the School of Graduate Studies, he established a fund designed to improve the mentoring of graduate teaching assistants, created humanities and arts awards for faculty, and made diversity an integral criterion in evaluating program quality. He also headed up a two-year initiative to improve undergraduate education. Wm. A. Wulf is currently on leave from the University of Virginia to serve as President of the National Academy of

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Preparing for the Revolution: Information Technology and the Future of the Research University Engineering. During 1988-1990, Dr. Wulf was Assistant Director of the National Science Foundation, where he headed the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering. Prior to joining the University of Virginia, Dr. Wulf founded Tartan Laboratories and was a professor at Carnegie Mellon University. While at Carnegie Mellon and Tartan, Dr. Wulf helped found the Pittsburgh High Technology Council and served as its Vice President and Director. His breadth and depth of experience have given him a unique perspective on the relationships between universities, industry, and government. Dr. Wulf is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a Fellow of three professional societies (ACM, IEEE, AAAS). He is also the author of over 80 papers and technical reports, has authored three books, and holds two U.S. patents. Joe B. Wyatt is Chancellor Emeritus of Vanderbilt University. Much of his earlier career focused on computer science and systems, in both industry and academia. In addition to holding faculty positions, he was also associated with EDUCOM in various capacities, including service as President and CEO. In 1976, he was appointed Vice President for Administration at Harvard and was named Chancellor of Vanderbilt in 1982, stepping down in 2000. He holds degrees in mathematics from Texas Christian University and the University of Texas. Mr. Wyatt has carried out research on behalf of the National Science Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the Office of Naval Research, and the Eli Lilly Foundation. He is coauthor of the book Financial Planning Models and the author of numerous papers and articles in fields relating to technology, management, and education. Additionally, Mr. Wyatt serves on a number of corporate boards, as well as professional and service organizations, and was a founding director of the Massachusetts Technology Development Corporation. He is Chairman of the Universities Research Association and past Co-chair of the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable, as well as past Chairman of the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce. Mr. Wyatt is also a member of the Association of American Universities, the Business Higher Education Forum, the Advisory Committee of the Public Agenda Foundation, and the Council on Competitiveness.