H Committee Biographies

Jo Ivey Boufford, M.D. (Co-chair), is professor of health policy and public service at the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University, where she served as dean between June 1, 1997, and December 31, 2002. Before that she served as principal deputy assistant secretary for health in the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) from November 1993 to January 1997 and as acting assistant secretary from January 1997 to May 1997. While at DHHS she served as the U.S. representative on the Executive Board of the World Health Organization (WHO) from 1994 to 1997 and was reappointed to this position in May 1998. From May 1991 to September 1993, Dr. Boufford served as director of the King’s Fund College, London, England. She served as president of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC), the largest municipal health system in the United States, from December 1985 to October 1989. She was elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine in 1992. She is currently a member of the National Advisory Council on Graduate Medical Education and the National Advisory Council for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. She received a B.A. (psychology) magna cum laude from the University of Michigan and an M.D. with distinction from the University of Michigan Medical School. She is board certified in pediatrics.

Christine K. Cassel, M.D. (Co-chair), is dean of the School of Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University. Previously, she was the chairman of the Henry L. Schwarz Department of Geriatrics and Adult Development,



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The Future of the Public’s Health in the 21st Century H Committee Biographies Jo Ivey Boufford, M.D. (Co-chair), is professor of health policy and public service at the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University, where she served as dean between June 1, 1997, and December 31, 2002. Before that she served as principal deputy assistant secretary for health in the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) from November 1993 to January 1997 and as acting assistant secretary from January 1997 to May 1997. While at DHHS she served as the U.S. representative on the Executive Board of the World Health Organization (WHO) from 1994 to 1997 and was reappointed to this position in May 1998. From May 1991 to September 1993, Dr. Boufford served as director of the King’s Fund College, London, England. She served as president of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC), the largest municipal health system in the United States, from December 1985 to October 1989. She was elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine in 1992. She is currently a member of the National Advisory Council on Graduate Medical Education and the National Advisory Council for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. She received a B.A. (psychology) magna cum laude from the University of Michigan and an M.D. with distinction from the University of Michigan Medical School. She is board certified in pediatrics. Christine K. Cassel, M.D. (Co-chair), is dean of the School of Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University. Previously, she was the chairman of the Henry L. Schwarz Department of Geriatrics and Adult Development,

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The Future of the Public’s Health in the 21st Century professor of geriatrics and internal medicine at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and director of the Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center at the Bronx Veterans Affairs Medical Center. She joined Mount Sinai in 1995 after 10 years as chief of general internal medicine at the University of Chicago, where she was also professor of medicine and public policy studies, chief of the Section on General Internal Medicine, director of the Center for Health Policy Research, and George M. Eisenberg Professor in Geriatrics, Health, and Society. Dr. Cassel’s numerous publications include the textbooks Geriatric Medicine: Principles and Practice (Springer, New York, 2003) and Ethical Dimensions in the Health Professions (Saunders, Philadelphia, 1981). Dr. Cassel is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences, past president of the American College of Physicians, and past chair of the American Board of Internal Medicine. She chairs the boards of trustees of the American Board of Internal Medicine, The Greenwall Foundation, and the Ethics Advisory Panel for the Kaiser Permanente Health System. She is a trustee of the Russell Sage Foundation. Dr. Cassel has served on several IOM committees: as the chair of the Committee on Care at the End of Life, as the chair of the Committee on Non-Heart Beating Organ Donation, and as a member of the Committee on Quality of Care in America. Kaye W. Bender, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N. (Mississippi Department of Health), was appointed deputy state health officer for the Mississippi State Department of Health in October 1998. As deputy, Dr. Bender is second in command of the statewide public health system. Before accepting this position, Dr. Bender served for 10 years as the chief of staff of the state health officer at the Mississippi State Department of Health. Her responsibilities included directing the Offices of Policy and Planning, Public Health Nursing, Field Services, and Primary Care Development, among others. Over her professional career, Dr. Bender has served in leadership positions as director of public health nursing, field services nurse consultant, District V supervising nurse, and maternal-child health nurse consultant with the Mississippi State Department of Health. Dr. Bender is active in the American Nurses Association, the Mississippi Nurses Association, the American Public Health Association, and the Association of Community Health Nursing Educators. Lisa Berkman, Ph.D. (Harvard School of Public Health), is a social epidemiologist whose work focuses extensively on psychosocial influences on health outcomes. Her research has centered on understanding social inequalities in health related to socioeconomic status, different racial and ethnic groups, and social networks, support, and social isolation. The majority of her work is devoted to identifying the role of social networks and support in predicting declines in physical and cognitive functioning, onset

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The Future of the Public’s Health in the 21st Century of disease, and mortality, especially related to cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease. The primary studies in which Dr. Berkman is involved are large prospective cohort studies, like the Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly Studies and the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Successful Aging longitudinal studies in communities. She is also involved with a secondary set of studies that consist of clinical trials to test the effects of psychosocial interventions in improving the prognosis in people with cerebrovascular or cardiovascular disease. JudyAnn Bigby, M.D. (Harvard Medical School), is a graduate of Wellesley College and Harvard Medical School. She completed a primary care internal medicine residency at the University of Washington Affiliated Hospitals in Seattle and was a Henry J. Kaiser Fellow in General Internal Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Currently, Dr. Bigby is the medical director of community health programs at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Bigby has devoted her career to addressing the health care needs of disadvantaged and vulnerable populations. Currently, Dr. Bigby’s work focuses on the health care of low-income and minority women. She is working on integrated primary care and public health models for care of disadvantaged women to identify ways to overcome barriers to care and to address racial disparities in health status and health access, particularly in breast and cervical cancer and infant mortality. Dr. Bigby serves on many boards, including the Public Health Commission for the City of Boston, the Women’s Education and Industrial Union, the Medical Foundation, and the Center for Community Health, Education, Research and Service. She has also served on national committees including the Council on Graduate Medical Education. Thomas A. Burke, Ph.D., M.P.H. (Johns Hopkins University), is an associate professor at the Department of Health Policy and Management of the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, with joint appointments in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences and the Department of Oncology, School of Medicine. He is also codirector of the Johns Hopkins Risk Sciences and Public Policy Institute. His research interests include environmental epidemiology, the evaluation of community exposures to environmental pollutants, the assessment and communication of environmental risks, and the application of epidemiology and health risk assessment to public policy. He is a principal investigator for the Pew Environmental Health Commission aimed at revitalizing the national infrastructure for environmental health. Dr. Burke is the chair of the Advisory Committee to the National Center for Environmental Health of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and a member of the National Research Council

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The Future of the Public’s Health in the 21st Century Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. He is particularly interested in health and environment in the cities. Before his appointment at Johns Hopkins, Dr. Burke was deputy commissioner of health for the state of New Jersey. He has also served as assistant commissioner for occupational and environmental health at the New Jersey Department of Health and as director of the Office of Science and Research in the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Dr. Burke received a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Pennsylvania, an M.P.H. from the University of Texas, and a B.S. from Saint Peter’s College. Mark Finucane (Ernst & Young, LLP) is Principal, Leadership Development Solutions, Ernst & Young Health Sciences Advisory Services. Formerly, Mr. Finucane served as director of the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (DHS), where for 5 years (until July 2001) leading the second largest public health system in the nation. The Department provides over 85 percent of all uncompensated medical care in Los Angeles County, which is home to the largest concentration of uninsured (more than 2.5 million) in the country. Under Mr. Finucane’s leadership, DHS increased its ambulatory care visits by 800,000, resulting in substantial cost savings and decreases in inappropriate emergency room use. During Mr. Finucane’s tenure, the department created the Office of Women’s Health, the Diversity Program, and the multiagency Health Authority Law Enforcement Task Force. In June 2000, Mr. Finucane successfully led negotiations with the federal and state governments to secure a 5-year extension of the Medicaid Demonstration Project that will allow DHS to continue its restructuring efforts with an influx of approximately $2 billion in funding from county, state, and federal governments. Before accepting his position with the Los Angeles DHS, Mr. Finucane was the director of the Contra Costa County Health Services Department from 1984 to 1996 and held a series of senior executive positions at the San Francisco Department of Health and San Francisco General Hospital from 1977 to 1984. George R. Flores, M.D., M.P.H. (California Endowment) is a public health policy and program consultant. Until May 2002, Dr. Flores was health officer and director of public health for the San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency in California. His present work focuses on health disparities, social justice, access to care, and migrant and border health issues. Recent work includes public health/bioterrorism preparedness and public health system performance assessment. Dr. Flores has also served as a health officer in Sonoma County, California; program director for Project HOPE in Guatemala; deputy health officer, Santa Barbara County, California; and clinical faculty, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine. He presently serves on the Public Health Advisory Committee to

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The Future of the Public’s Health in the 21st Century California’s Little Hoover Commission and the Board of Directors of the Latino Coalition for a Healthy California and is a former member of the Department of Education’s Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation. He is an alumnus of the University of Utah College of Medicine, Harvard School of Public Health, the Kennedy School of Government, and the Public Health Leadership Institute. Lawrence O. Gostin, J.D. (Georgetown University Law Center), is a professor at the Georgetown University Law Center, a professor of law and public health at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, and a fellow of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics. He is also director of the Center for Law and the Public’s Health at Johns Hopkins and Georgetown Universities and health law and ethics editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Previously, he served as executive director of the American Society of Law, Medicine, and Ethics and as an adjunct professor at the Harvard Law School and the Harvard School of Public Health. He was also consulting legislative counsel to the U.S. Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee, chaired by Senator Edward Kennedy, and a member of the President’s Task Force on National Health Care Reform. He also serves as a consultant or advisory committee member for the World Health Organization, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Academies. From 1974 to 1985, Mr. Gostin was the head of the National Council of Civil Liberties, legal director of the National Association of Mental Health, and a faculty member at Oxford University in Great Britain. He received the Rosemary Delbridge Memorial Award from the National Consumer Council (United Kingdom) for the person “who has most influenced Parliament and government to act for the welfare of society.” His latest book is Public Health Law: Power, Duty, Restraint (University of California Press and the Milbank Memorial Fund, 2001). Mr. Gostin was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2000. Pablo Hernandez, M.D. (Wyoming Mental Health Division), has been the hospital administrator at the Wyoming State Hospital since 1995. On June 1, 1997, he was appointed as the Behavioral Health Division Administrator (now known as the Mental Health Division) for the Wyoming Department of Health, which encompasses the State Hospital and the state’s community programs. Dr. Hernandez received a medical degree from the Salamanca Medical School in Salamanca, Spain. His clinical career began in 1968 in the state of Virginia, where he was director of gerontological services. He moved on to the state of Mississippi, where he spent the next 14 years establishing community-based service programs as well as active psychiatric treatment modalities and substance abuse services. He also served as the director of the East Mississippi State Hospital and the Las Vegas Medical

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The Future of the Public’s Health in the 21st Century Center in Las Vegas, Nevada. Dr. Hernandez has served on multiple state and national committees addressing issues of persons with persistent mental illness, mental health service system changes, as well as cultural perspectives to mental health services. He has served as a consultant to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration reviewing service system designs and as a reviewer of federal grants to states. He is an active member of the National Alliance of the Mentally Ill and the National Latino Behavioral Group. Judith R. Lave, Ph.D. (University of Pittsburgh), is a professor of health economics at the Graduate School of Public Health and codirector of the Center for Research on Health Care at the University of Pittsburgh. She holds secondary appointments in the Graduate School of Public Health, the Katz Graduate School of Business, the Department of Economics, and the Department of Psychiatry. She received her undergraduate training at Queen’s University in Canada (from which she received an honorary doctorate in 1994) and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. She has been a faculty member at Carnegie-Mellon University; director of the Division of Economic and Quantitative Analysis, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services; and director of the Office of Research in the Health Care Financing Administration. She was a charter member of the federal government’s Senior Executive Service. Dr. Lave has published widely. Her main interests are in the cost, utilization, and financing of health care services, and she has conducted cost-effectiveness studies and cost–benefit analyses. Her recent interest has focused on selected issues related to managed care. Dr. Lave has served as a consultant to private and public agencies in the United States and Canada. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the National Academy for Social Insurance and is a distinguished fellow of the Academy for Health Services Research. She is past president of the Association (now Academy) for Health Services Research. She is currently on the Steering Committee for the National Academy of Social Insurance’s project on Restructuring Medicare for the Long Term and on the Technical Advisory Group for the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council. John R. Lumpkin, M.D., M.P.H. (Illinois Department of Public Health), was appointed director of the Illinois Department of Public Health in January 1991, after serving as acting director since September 1990 and previously as associate director of the Department’s Office of Health Care Regulation. Before joining the state health department, Dr. Lumpkin served as an emergency physician at several Chicago hospitals. He teaches public health information systems and performance measurement at the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health. He is also a leading

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The Future of the Public’s Health in the 21st Century expert on injury prevention and has provided technical assistance to Egypt’s Ministry of Health on behalf of the U.S. Public Health Service. He has served on a number of national advisory committees and currently serves as chair of the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics (NCVHS) and is member of the NCVHS Executive Subcommittee and Workgroup on National Health Information Infrastructure. Dr. Lumpkin received a medical degree in 1974 from Northwestern University Medical School, where he continues to serve as assistant professor in emergency medicine. He trained in emergency medicine at the University of Chicago and earned an M.P.H. from the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health. Dr. Lumpkin is past president of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, a former member of the Board of Trustees of the Foundation for Accountability, a former commissioner of the Pew Commission on Environmental Health, a board member of the National Forum for Health Care Quality Measurement and Reporting, a past board member of the American College of Emergency Physicians, and past president of the Society of Teachers of Emergency Medicine. Patricia A. Peyser, Ph.D. (University of Michigan), is professor of epidemiology at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, where she founded the Public Health Genetics Interdepartmental Concentration. She is also a faculty member in the Center for Statistical Genetics and is on the executive committee for the Genome Sciences Training Grant, which is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). She has served on the editorial board of the American Journal of Epidemiology and is currently on the editorial board of Human Genome Epidemiology. Her research interests for the past 20 years have focused primarily on the genetic basis of common chronic diseases and their risk factors. She is a coinvestigator in the National Heart Blood and Lung Institute’s Family Blood Pressure Program in the project Genetic Determinants of High Blood Pressure in Three Racial Groups. She is also principal investigator in the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute-funded study Epidemiology of Coronary Artery Calcification, a cohort study that focuses on the genetic and environmental determinants of coronary artery calcification. Dr. Peyser serves on an NIH advisory committee for the Family Heart Study. Most recently, she served as a member of the Program Planning Committee for the September 2000 3rd National Conference on Genetics and Public Health, sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Health Resources and Service Administration, the National Human Genome Research Institute, the University of Michigan Department of Community Health, and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. Dr. Peyser received a Ph.D. in ecology and evolution from the State University of New York at Stony Brook and a B.A. in mathematics from the University of Vermont.

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The Future of the Public’s Health in the 21st Century George Strait, M.S. (MedComm Inc.) is a recognized media expert in health and science and chief executive officer of MedComm Inc. His most recent position was managing editor with the Kaisernetwork.org. Previously, he was the senior vice-president for media and distribution for The Dr. Spock Co., a media company. From 1977 until 2000 he was ABC News’s primary correspondent for medical and health news and was named senior medical correspondent in 1983. In that capacity, he contributed to World News Tonight with Peter Jennings and Nightline on such issues as health care reform, the medical and ethical concerns regarding new technologies, and AIDS. Mr. Strait was the first U.S. network correspondent allowed to enter The Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire) to report on the AIDS epidemic in Africa. He also reported in depth on the former Soviet Union’s health care system. In 1995, for the second time, Mr. Strait received the broadcast news industry’s highest award, the Alfred I. DuPont Award, for his groundbreaking series on the disparity in health care between men and women. In addition, Mr. Strait received a Gold Medal Award from the National Association of Black Journalists and a Blakesely Award from the American Heart Association. He was cofounder of the National Association of Black Journalists. Mr. Strait writes and lectures frequently about quality-of-care issues in the changing medical environment. In 1986, Mr. Strait was in residence at the Harvard School of Public Health on an annual fellowship for science writers and has been a member of Directors of the Council of the Advancement of Science Writing. Mr. Strait currently serves as the chair of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. A native of Boston, Mr. Strait graduated from Boston University with an A.B. in biology in 1967. He also completed an M.S. program in biochemical genetics at Atlanta University in 1969. In 1995, he received Boston University’s Distinguished Alumnus Award for his career in journalism. Thomas W. Valente, Ph.D. (University of Southern California) is the director of the Master of Public Health program and an associate professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine at the University of Southern California School of Medicine. He is newly arrived from the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, where he spent 9 years conducting research and teaching health communication, program evaluation, and network analysis. His main research interest is understanding health-related behavior through mathematical and network models using empirical studies and computer simulations. Dr. Valente conducts research on substance abuse prevention and treatment programs and is also interested in the evaluation of communication programs designed to promote health-related behavior. He is also the author of Network Models of the Diffusion of Innovations (Hampton Press, 1995) and Evaluating Health Communication Campaigns (Oxford University Press, 2003). He received a B.S. in

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The Future of the Public’s Health in the 21st Century mathematics from Mary Washington College, an M.S. in mass communication from San Diego State University, and a Ph.D. from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Southern California. Patricia W. Wahl, Ph.D. (University of Washington). Since 1971, Dr. Wahl has been a professor of biostatistics at the University of Washington and was associate dean of the School of Public Health and Community Medicine from 1985 to 1997. She also served as the acting chair of the Department of Pathobiology and acting dean before becoming dean of the school in 1999. Dr. Wahl currently participates in three collaborative research projects: the Cardiovascular Health Study, a longitudinal study of cardiovascular disease in elderly men and women; the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, a longitudinal study of subclinical cardiovascular disease in multiethnic groups; and the Japanese American Community Diabetes (JACD) study, a longitudinal investigation of type II diabetes in a local Japanese-American community. In 1999 Dr. Wahl received the American Public Health Association’s Statistics Section Award for outstanding contributions to the field of statistics and public health in administration, research, and training.

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