TABLE 12-1 Carcinogenic Effects of Fuels in Humans and Experimental Animals

Fuel Type

Species or Cell Line

Exposure Concentration

Exposure Duration

Effects

Reference

Jet fuel

Human (historical prospective cohort study of 2,176 men in Swedish armed forces)

Not reported

Not reported

No evidence of association between exposure to jet fuel and lymphatic malignancies

Selden and Ahlborg 1991 as cited in ATSDR 1998

Jet fuel

Human (population-based case-referent study of cohort of 3,726 cancer patients)

Not reported

Not reported

Screening-level analyses suggested association between kerosene exposure and stomach cancer, but result was not confirmed by in-depth analyses; screening analyses indicated that subjects with prior exposure to jet fuel (n = 43) had OR of 2.1 for colon cancer (n = 7), 2.1 for rectal cancer (n = 4), and 2.5 for kidney cancer (n = 7); in-depth analyses indicated association between jet-fuel exposure and kidney cancer (OR = 3.4) for workers exposed at substantial level (n = 6); dose-response relation observed for jet-fuel exposure and increased risk of kidney cancer

Siemaitycki et al. 1987

Jet fuel

Human (population-based case-control study;

Not reported

Not reported

Indication of excess risk of renal-cell carcinoma among aircraft mechanics and others with workplace exposures to jet fuel

Parent et al. 2000



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