B
Committee Biographies

Steven R.J. Brueck (Chair) is the director of the Center for High Technology Materials (CHTM) and is a professor of electrical and computer engineering and a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of New Mexico. As CHTM director, he manages a research and education program that spans both optoelectronics and microelectronics. The first, optoelectronics, unites optics and electronics, and is found in CHTM’s emphasis on semiconductor laser sources, optical modulators, detectors, and optical fibers. The second, microelectronics, applies semiconductor technology to the fabrication of electronic and optoelectronic devices for information and control applications. Examples of these unifying themes at work are silicon-based optoelectronics and optoelectronics for silicon manufacturing sensors. He is also a former research staff member of MIT Lincoln Laboratories. He is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society, the Materials Research Society, a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and a fellow of the Optical Society of America. His expertise includes nanoscience and nanotechnology, materials, electronics, and physics.

S. Thomas Picraux (Vice Chair) is the executive director of materials research, a co-director of the Center for Solid State Science in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, a codirector of the Center for Solid State Electronics Research in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and a professor of chemical and materials engineering at Arizona State University. His current focus areas include materials that can be used to make ultrasmall devices (nanotechnology) and materials, such as wide band-gap semiconductors, that can survive in extremely harsh environments. He is a former member of the technical staff at



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Implications of Emerging Micro- and Nanotechnologies B Committee Biographies Steven R.J. Brueck (Chair) is the director of the Center for High Technology Materials (CHTM) and is a professor of electrical and computer engineering and a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of New Mexico. As CHTM director, he manages a research and education program that spans both optoelectronics and microelectronics. The first, optoelectronics, unites optics and electronics, and is found in CHTM’s emphasis on semiconductor laser sources, optical modulators, detectors, and optical fibers. The second, microelectronics, applies semiconductor technology to the fabrication of electronic and optoelectronic devices for information and control applications. Examples of these unifying themes at work are silicon-based optoelectronics and optoelectronics for silicon manufacturing sensors. He is also a former research staff member of MIT Lincoln Laboratories. He is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society, the Materials Research Society, a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and a fellow of the Optical Society of America. His expertise includes nanoscience and nanotechnology, materials, electronics, and physics. S. Thomas Picraux (Vice Chair) is the executive director of materials research, a co-director of the Center for Solid State Science in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, a codirector of the Center for Solid State Electronics Research in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and a professor of chemical and materials engineering at Arizona State University. His current focus areas include materials that can be used to make ultrasmall devices (nanotechnology) and materials, such as wide band-gap semiconductors, that can survive in extremely harsh environments. He is a former member of the technical staff at

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Implications of Emerging Micro- and Nanotechnologies Sandia National Laboratories, where he also served as manager and director. At Sandia, he oversaw a variety of basic and applied science departments, including those working on nanostructure physics, optical sciences, chemical processing, biomolecular materials, surface science, and semiconductor materials and devices. He also helped develop nanotechnology research initiatives for the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. He is a member of the Materials Research Society and the American Vacuum Society, a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, a fellow of the American Physical Society, and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has numerous publications, including one book that he wrote and four books that he edited, and has written 12 book chapters. His expertise includes nanoscience and -technology, materials, and electronics. John H. Belk is associate technical fellow, Phantom Works, and manager of technology planning and acquisition at the Boeing Company. He has contributed to new manufacturing processes for composite materials, optical fiber sensors for smart structures, MEMS-based sensing systems, and satellite-to-satellite laser communications while conceiving, winning, and managing millions of dollars in corporate research and development funding for Boeing in these areas. Most recently, he has been working in the Phantom Works Technology Planning and Acquisition organization to transition technologies into the Boeing Company from cutting-edge nanotechnology enterprises within venture capital funds. He received his M.S. degree in mechanical and aerospace sciences from the University of Rochester and a master’s degree in engineering management from Washington University. He is now working with others across the Boeing enterprise to develop a coordinated nanoscience/nanotechnology plan for all of Boeing’s activities. He holds six U.S. patents in sensing, telecommunications, and quality applications. His expertise includes process sensing. Robert J. Celotta is a NIST fellow and leader of the electron physics group at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. His current primary research area is nanostructure science, including surface and multilayer magnetism research including polarized electron microscopy of magnetic materials; research on surface nanostructure fabrication using laser-focused deposition; nanostructure fabrication and characterization using room- and low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and autonomous atom assembly; research on the production and detection of electron spin polarization and the interaction of polarized electrons with atoms and solid surfaces; and research on electron collisions with atoms and molecules using monochromatic electron beams and state-selected atoms. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Vacuum Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Washington Academy of Sciences. His expertise includes nanoscience and nanotechnology and surface physics.

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Implications of Emerging Micro- and Nanotechnologies William C. Holton is a visiting research professor in the department of electrical and computer engineering at North Carolina State University. His current research interest is quantum computing. He is also a former vice president for research operations at Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC). He directed SRC’s research program, participated in the definition and growth of SRC as the semiconductor industry’s premier sponsor of university research, led in creation of the initial SIA Semiconductor Roadmap, and was influential in the formation of SEMATECH. Prior to joining SRC, he was director of research and development at Texas Instruments. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and a fellow of the American Physical Society. He has over 120 technical publications and patent applications. His expertise includes electronics and physics. Siegfried W. Janson is a senior scientist at the Aerospace Corporation. His current research interests are micropropulsion, microelectromechanical systems for spacecraft, and silicon satellites (“nanosats”). He invented the silicon nanosatellite and has published over 15 papers on their propulsion requirements, basic design issues, and orbital architecture. He worked in the MEMS field for over 8 years and authored or coauthored over 20 papers on microthrusters, MEMS for space applications, and silicon satellites. He flew multiple MEMS devices as a part of the MEMS testbed on the STS-93 flight and two digital microthruster arrays on a recent sounding rocket flight. He assembled a number of MEMS materials and test structures as part of the Materials on the International Space Station experiment, which was launched in late 2002. He is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and a senior member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. His expertise includes microscience and microtechnology. Way Kuo, NAE, is the associate vice chancellor for engineering for the Texas A&M University system, executive associate dean for Dwight Look College of Engineering, assistant director for the Texas Engineering Experiment Station, and holder of the engineering college’s Royce E. Wisenbaker Chair in Innovation. His professional interests are modeling and evaluating the reliability of modern electronic systems, with emphasis on optimal systems design. He is recognized as one of the principal scholars responsible for developing cost-effective methodologies for reducing the infant mortality period in the fast-evolving microelectronics industry. He is a fellow of the American Society for Quality, of the Institute of Industrial Engineers, and of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He is an elected academician of the International Academy for Quality. His expertise includes electronics. David J. Nagel is a research professor at the George Washington University. He is now working on the development and application of MEMS and microsystems

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Implications of Emerging Micro- and Nanotechnologies for the military and other sectors, with special attention to radio-frequency and acoustic systems. He is a former research physicist, section head, branch head, and superintendent at the Naval Research Laboratory. At NRL, his research interests centered on radiation physics, especially x-ray spectroscopy, and on materials sciences, with applications to materials analysis, plasma diagnostics, integrated circuit production, environmental studies, and MEMS. As the NRL superintendent of the condensed matter and radiation sciences division, he was a member of the Senior Executive Service and managed the experimental and theoretical research and development efforts of 150 government and contractor personnel. He is a member of the American Physical Society, the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers, and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He has written or coauthored over 150 technical articles. He is lead author of a patent on x-ray lithography that formed the basis of a 100-person start-up company. His expertise includes microscience and microtechnology, nanoscience and nanotechnology, materials, and physics. P. Andrew Penz is an employee and consultant with SAIC. In this position he has been developing and testing radar deinterleaving algorithms. His current work is focusing on enabling the transfer of near-real-time radar data from military platforms, e.g., the HARM Targeting System, to a national intelligence agency. Previously, he was a senior member of the technical staff in the nanoelectronic branch at Raytheon TI Systems. At Raytheon he was principal investigator on a DARPA contract to build in software an artificial nervous system (ANS) for command and control of autonomous military systems. The program produced code designed to simulate 250k high-level neurons, a computer architecture to update each neuron every millisecond, computer simulations of the dynamics of the 250k, six-layer array and a simulation showing the ability of resonant tunneling diodes to emulate axon-type active transmission line communication. He also currently holds the position of adjunct professor at the University of Texas at Dallas. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the Society for Information Display, a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the International Neural Network Society. His expertise includes nanoscience and nanotechnology, electronics, and physics. Albert P. Pisano, NAE, is the director of the Electronics Research Laboratory (ERL), the director of the Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center, a professor of mechanical engineering, and a professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of California at Berkeley. As director of the ERL, he manages an annual budget of about $50 million, a staff of 140 persons, and over 600 graduate students. He is in charge of day-to-day operations, long-range planning, and campus-level fundraising. His primary research interests include invention, design, fabrication, modeling, and optimization of MEMS: micro power

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Implications of Emerging Micro- and Nanotechnologies generation devices, micro and nano resonators for RF communications, micro fluidic systems for drug delivery, micro inertial instruments, and micro information storage systems. He is a former program manager for microelectromechanical systems at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). He is a member of Pi Tau Sigma, Tau Beta Pi, and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and an associate member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He has authored or coauthored over 93 refereed publications and has graduated 20 Ph.D. students and more than 40 Masters students from the University of California at Berkeley. He frequently serves as a consultant to industry managers, academic administrators, engineering society managers, and government policy makers on MEMS research, design, application, and commercialization. His expertise includes microscience and microtechnology and nanoscience and nanotechnology. Rosemary L. Smith is codirector of the Micro Instruments and Systems Laboratory (MISL) and a professor of electrical engineering at the University of California at Davis. Her research encompasses the design, fabrication, and applications of microfabricated sensors and instruments, including research in new microfabrication technologies and materials. She founded MISL to enhance interaction with, and serve as a microtechnology resource for, researchers in the medical and biological communities at UC Davis. MISL now has participating faculty members from dermatology, neuroscience, plant pathology, ophthalmology chemistry, veterinary medicine, molecular and cellular biology, robotics, mechanical engineering, biomedical engineering, and aeronautical engineering. She is a member of Tau Beta Pi, Eta Kappa Nu, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Her expertise includes microscience and microtechnology, materials, electronics, and bioengineering. Peter J. Stang, NAS, is dean of the College of Science and a professor of chemistry at the University of Utah. He is a preeminent physical-organic chemist and a leading experimentalist whose work has contributed significantly to modern organic chemistry. He discovered and imaginatively developed vinyl trifluoromethanesulfonates (triflates) and their chemistry. His pioneering work on the assembly of metallocyclic polygons and polyhedra is leading to new pathways to nanoscale devices and new materials. His current research interests range from physical-organic to supramolecular chemistry and self-assembly. He is a member of the American Chemical Society. He is author or coauthor of 350 publications in international and national peer-reviewed journals. His expertise includes chemistry. George W. Sutton, NAE, is a principal engineer at the SPARTA Corporation supporting the Missile Defense Agency. He is a former director of the Washington office and chief scientist for Aero Thermo Technology, Inc., a former director

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Implications of Emerging Micro- and Nanotechnologies of electro-optic research at Kaman Aerospace Corporation, and a former vice president of Jaycor and the Avco-Evevett Research Laboratory. Previously, he was scientific advisor to the Air Force. He is a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and a fellow of both the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He was editor in chief of the AIAA Journal for 30 years. He has written three books, more than 100 papers in technical journals and conference proceedings, many patents, and NRC reports. His doctorate is from the California Institute of Technology in mechanical engineering and physics, magna cum laude. His expertise is in military aerospace, including physics and aerospace engineering. He is a finalist for the 2002 National Medal for Technology. William M. Tolles is a consultant. He is a former associate director of research for strategic planning and a superintendent of the chemistry division at the Naval Research Laboratory. He is also a former dean of research, dean of science and engineering, and professor of chemistry at the Naval Postgraduate School. He is a member of the American Chemical Society and the Materials Research Society. He has held long-term memberships in Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, the American Physical Society, and the Optical Society of America. He has over 50 publications. His expertise includes microscience and microtechnology, nanoscience and nanotechnology, and chemistry. Robert J. Trew is the head of the electrical and computer engineering department and a professor of engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He is also a former director of basic research in the office of the deputy under secretary of defense for science and technology and had management oversight responsibility for the $1.3 billion annual basic research programs of the Department of Defense. He was vice chair of the U.S. government inter-agency committee that planned and implemented the National Nanotechnology Initiative. He is a member of Sigma Xi, Eta Kappa Nu, Tau Beta Pi, the Materials Research Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Society for Engineering Education, is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and serves on the Microwave Theory and Techniques Society ADCOM. He is currently editor of IEEE Microwave Magazine. He has over 140 publications and 14 book chapters and has given over 260 technical and programmatic presentations. His expertise includes nanoscience and nanotechnology and electronics. Mary H. Young is director of the HRL Laboratories’ Sensors and Materials Laboratory. She manages an organization with research emphasis in microelectromechanical (MEM) technologies, advanced energy storage and polymeric sensors, electro-optical sensor materials and process technologies, materials engineering, and nanoelectronics technologies. She has contributed original work in

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Implications of Emerging Micro- and Nanotechnologies electronic transport physics in semiconductors and in the physics of infrared sensitive materials and IR devices. She is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, the American Physical Society, and the Materials Research Society. She has more than two dozen publications on semiconductor materials, infrared detectors, impurity hopping transport, neutron transmutation in semiconductors, and superlattice materials and devices. Her expertise includes microscience and microtechnology, nanoscience and nanotechnology, materials, electronics, and physics.